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Which clippings match 'Mullet' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 JANUARY 2015

Melbourne youth subculture: before punk there were Sharpies

"An extension of the UK skinhead movement, the roots of sharp lie in the influx of European immigrants in Australia in the early 1960s. By the late 1960s the Sharpie subculture had evolved and existed in the mainly working class and migrant inner city suburbs such as Richmond, Fitzroy, Collingwood and Brunswick where Greeks, Italians, Yogoslavs and English immigrants all lived side by side. But as street corners gradually changed to shopping centres, by the early 1970s, the Sharpie movement started to spread to the outer suburbs of Melbourne where a 'rough as guts' working class ethos existed.

The name 'Sharpie' originated from the fashion. It was all about the clothes and looking sharp, and flash. The first wave of Sharpies from 1966 – 1969 were strongly influenced by UK Mod fashions, the 1964 Rockers and the style of certain Italian migrants. Demeanor was tough, hair was short back and sides and clothing was custom made by European tailors, thus allowing for a blend of neo–thirties suave combined with a contemporary larrikin attitude. Dances were also a big part of the Sharpies social fabric, with bands such as Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs, Wild Cherries, Ray Brown & the Whispers, and Max Merritt & the Meteors being popular choices.

From 1970–1980, the second wave of Sharpies were following hard, tough rock'n'roll bands like Lobby Loyde and the Coloured Balls, Buster Brown, Rose Tattoo, The Angels and ACDC. Sharpies were now often congregating in large numbers, regularly attending live band concerts at town hall and high school dances as well as early discos. But due to their sheer numbers, Sharpies were often perceived as being untouchable by the police and were often associated with excessive violence, regularly taking part in fights."

(Melynda von Wayward)

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TAGS

1960s1970s • ACDC (band) • Australiabelonging • Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs (band) • British Australian • Brunswick (Victoria) • Buster Brown (band) • Carol Jerrems • clothesclothing fashion • Collingwood (Victoria) • Coloured Balls (band) • counterculturecultural codescustom madedisaffected youth • disco • European immigrants • European style • excessive violence • Fitzroy (Victoria) • Greek Australian • Heidelberg Technical College • high school dance • identity performanceinner city • inner city suburbs • Italian Australian • Italian immigrant • larrikin • larrikin attitude • Lobby Loyde (band) • looking sharp • Max Merritt and the Meteors (band) • Melbourne • Melynda von Wayward • mod fashionmullet • outer suburbs • protopunk • punk rockpunk rock ethos • Ray Brown and the Whispers (band) • Richmond (Victoria) • rock n roll • rockers • Rose Tattoo (band) • rough as guts • sharpie movement • sharpie subculture • sharpies • shopping centre • sideburns • skinheadsocial fabricstyle • suave • subculture • The Angels (band) • town hallurban clothingVictoria (Australia) • Wild Cherries (band) • working classworking class culture • working class ethos • youth cultureyouth subculture • Yugoslav

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2012

Die Antwoord: a provocative celebration of otherness

"If Die Antwoord are a joke, they're a painfully acute one. This over–the–top South African rap–rave trio, comprising rappers Ninja and Yolandi Visser and a hulking DJ called Hi–Tek, purport to represent 'zef', a strain of working–class/underclass Boer' culture that perhaps most closely equates to our own pejorative term 'chav'.

The band's co–founder and frontman, Watkin Tudor Jones, aka Ninja, has previously appeared in a host of similar conceptual art–rap projects and situationist pranks."

(Ian Gittins, 16 November 2010)

Fig.1 Die Antwoord "Zef Side"

Fig.2 Die Antwoord "I Fink U Freeky", Directed by Roger Ballen & NINJA, Director of Photography Melle Van Essen, Edited by Jannie Hondekom @ Left, Post Production by Blade.

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Afrikaner • art projectbandBoer • Boer culture • chav • counterculture • Die Antwoord • dirtyDJ • DJ Hi-Tek (Marius Bosch) • grungy • lowbrow • lower socioeconomic status • mulletmusic video • Ninja (Watkin Tudor Jones) • othernessover-the-top • pejorative • poor white people • prankprovocativerap • rap-rave • raveshocksituationist • slur • social classSouth Africa • South African • subculturetrio • underclass • Watkin Tudor Jones • white trash • working class • Yolandi Visser • zef

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2008

The Love Connection: 1980s dating game hosted by Chuck Woolery

"Back in the 1980s and 1990s, Love Connection was an American television game show, hosted by Chuck Woolery. In the show, singles attempted to connect with a compatible partner in what was a reversed and modernized variant of The Dating Game. I say reversed, because instead of the whole point of the show being the meeting which would lead to the date, in Love Connection, they had already had the date and you get to see the after effects."
(The Retroist, 15 February 2012)

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1980s1983199480s televisionbachelorbacheloretteblind date • Chuck Woolery • dating • dating show • game showidentity performanceimpression management • Love Connection • mulletpersonal informationprofile imagerelationshipsretro cheesinessromanceromantic relationshipsself-disclosure • shoulder pads • social interactionstudio audiencetelevision • The Dating Game • two and two

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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