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Which clippings match 'Atom' keyword pg.1 of 2
14 FEBRUARY 2012

A is for Atom: atomic giants released from within the atom's heart

"Although the 'Atoms for Peace' campaign was formally launched in 1957, corporate America began to promote peaceful uses of atomic energy as early as the first few months after Hiroshima. A Is For Atom, an artifact of this effort, takes this highly loaded and threatening issue straight to the public in an attempt to 'humanize' the figure of the atom.

A Is For Atom speaks of five atomic 'giants' which 'man has released from within the atom's heart': the warrior and destroyer, the farmer, the healer, the engineer and the research worker. Each is pictured as a majestic, shimmering outline figure towering over the earth. 'But all are within man's power – subject to his command,' says the narrator reassuringly, and our future depends 'on man's wisdom, on his firmness in the use of that power.'

General Electric, a long–time manufacturer of electric appliances, power generation plants, and nuclear weapon components, is staking a claim here, asserting their interest in managing and exploiting this new and bewildering technology. Its pitch: this is powerful, frightening, near–apocalyptic technology, but managed with firmness, it can be profitable and promising. This 'Trust us with the control of technology, and we'll give you progress without end' pitch resembles what we've seen in films like General Motors' To New Horizons (on the Ephemeral Films disc). But the automobile, of course, wasn't a weapon of mass destruction.

In its first two years of release, A Is For Atom was seen by over seven million people in this version and a shortened ten–minute theatrical cut. In 1953 it won first prizes in both the Columbus (Ohio) and Turin (Italy) Film Festivals, the Freedoms Foundation Award, an 'oscar' from the Cleveland Film Festival, and a Merit Award from Scholastic Teacher. In 1954 it won first prize in the Stamford Film Festival, a Golden Reel Award from the American Film Assembly, and a second Grand Award from the Venice Film Festival. The film was remade in the mid–sixties and is still available for rental.

Like other John Sutherland films, A Is For Atom presents a portentious message in a visually delightful and often self–deprecating manner. 'Element Town' and its quirky inhabitants, including hyped–up Radium and somnolent Lead, is unforgettable, and the animated chain reaction manages to avoid any suggestion of nuclear fear."

(Internet Archive)

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TAGS

19572D • A is for Atom • animated presentationanimationapocalypticatomatomic energy • atomic giants • Atoms for Peace • automobilechain reactioncorporate America • destroyer • eduction campaign • electric appliances • electricity • electricty • Element Town • engineer • Ephemeral Films • farmer • future • General Electric • General Motorsgiant • healer • Hiroshima • humanise • Internet Archive • John Sutherland • lead • mass destructionnew horizonsnuclear fearnuclear weapon • portentious • power • power generation • progresspropaganda • radium • science • Sutherland Productions • technologytrusturaniumvisual representations of scientific concepts • visually delightful • warrior

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2012

Powers of Ten: a dramatic representation of our place in the universe

"Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward– into the hand of the sleeping picnicker– with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell."

(Powers of Ten © 1977 Eames Office LLC)

Fig.1 Original video of the "Powers of Ten". 1977, uploaded by EamesOffice on 26 Aug 2010, YouTube.

Fig.2 Interactive presentation of the "Powers of Ten". 2010 Based on the film by Charles and Ray Eames. An Eames Office Website.

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TAGS

19772010animated presentationatomblood • blood cell • bringing into relation • carbon atom • cellcell divisionCharles EameschartChicagocomposed of partscosmosDNA • Eames Office LLC • Earthfilmgalaxygraphic representationIBMin perspectiveinformation aestheticsinteractive information visualisationinteractive presentationjourney • lakeside • magnificationmagnitudesmicroscopic worldminuscule detailmolecule • outer edges • perspective • picnic • Powers of Ten • proton • Ray Eamesrelational viewrepresentationscalesciencespace • speck of light • subdivisionsuniverseviewvisual communicationvisual depictionvisual dramavisual representations of mathematical conceptsvisual scientific representationsvisual spectaclevisualisation • white blood cell • zooming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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TAGS

20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2009

The World Wide Web is a hypermedia application

"The World Wide Web is a hypermedia application, not just a collection of specifications. Again, our software development training doesn't help us here very much. Good ol' functional decomposition makes us (well, me at least) want to see the Web as HTTP (RFC 2616), URIs (RFC 3986), MIME types (Wikipedia entry to set of related RFCs), HTML/XHTML (W3C markup specifications) and HTML forms (W3C recommendation and RFC 2388).

In actual fact, it's all of those working together to provide, as Eric [Newcomer] said, the Web as a distributed hypermedia application (which, if I remember correctly is a point also made by Roy Fielding himself in the dissertation). The Web works because both user agents (browsers) and the server applications use all of these specifications together to expose a set of functionality to the interactive user. There is no a priori agreement between the browser and the Web server as to how the information service built on these specifications used, but because of agreement on how these specifications are used together, as an application, it doesn't matter if today, CNN.com is built using Microsoft ASP, and tomorrow it's built on PHP. Apart from the application of the 'Cool URIs Don't Change' principle, if a user starts from , they will always be able to utilize the CNN news service via their browser's implementation of those specifications and the implicit agreement of CNN to publish its service in accordance with them too.
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A hypermedia application such as Atom or RSS and content negotiation via MIME types, HTTP accept headers and embedded tags mean that this sort of evolution could happen without breaking the client–provided there is agreement on the application semantics of how those things should be both used and interpreted between clients and servers. Anything else means you're back to brittle, API based systems that can no longer evolve independently of each other."
(Andrew Townley, 16th December 2006)

[Andrew Townley attempts to re–emphasise the significance of the Internet as a hypermedia system. He does so as a criticism of what be believes is the conventional logic of programming which by extension is preoccupied with the development of APIs. So despite the immediate value of the REST API for enabling interaction with services by sites such as Delicious.com such efforts only conceal the real value of the Internet as a generalised, flexible and interoperable system.]

TAGS

APIapplicationarchitectureatomDeliciousdistributed hypermedia applicationhypermedia • hypermedia application • ICTinnovationinteractive mediaInternetinteroperability • MIME type • negotiationREST APIRoy FieldingRSSservicetechnologyweb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 FEBRUARY 2009

Feed on Feeds: server side RSS and Atom aggregator

"Desktop aggregators are great. They sit there all day, pinging away at sites, and as soon as they notice something new, they pop up little windows on your desktop, and let you read items. But what about when you go home from work? Or what about when you are on a trip? You get totally out of sync, and don't know what you've read and haven't read. You are enraged.

Feed on Feeds A server side aggregator solves this. It keeps track of what items you've read, and keeps happily checking up on your feeds no matter where you are. Whenever you want to see what's new, you just bring up a web page and scan the newest items. You can mark the items as read so they won't be shown again. Or, you can just always show the most recent N items, like the way LiveJournal's friends pages work. Also, having the aggregator in your browser eliminates the "impedance mismatch" that sometimes occurs between a desktop aggregator and your browser. All your native browsing methods work on a FEED ON FEEDS page. Open pages in new tabs, bookmark them for later, browse whatever way you like."
(Steve Minutillo)

[Feed on Feeds provides a useful way of sorting recent posts made to multiple blogs.]

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TAGS

aggregatoratom • Feed on Feeds • itch-scratch-ware • RSSweb application

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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