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Which clippings match 'Traditional Process' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 DECEMBER 2013

Some have always distrusted new things...

"Skepticism is not new to education. Emerging technologies are often viewed with fear and resistance. Just look at some of the history surrounding educational change.

'Students today can't prepare bark to calculate their problems. They depend upon their slates, which are more expensive. What will they do when the slate is dropped and it breaks? They will be unable to write.'–Teachers Conference, 1703

'Students today depend upon paper too much. They don't know how to write on a slate without getting chalk dust all over themselves. They can't clean a slate properly. What will they do when they run out of paper?'–Teachers Association, 1815

'Students today depend upon store–bought ink. They don't know how to make their own. When they run out of ink, they will be unable to write words or cipher until the next trip to the settlement. This is a sad commentary on modern times.'–Rural American Teacher, 1929

'Ballpoint pens will be the ruin of education in our country. Students use these devices and then throw them away! The American virtues of thrift and frugality are being discarded. Business and banks will never allow such expensive luxuries.'–Federated Teacher, 1959"

(Michael Bloom, Professional Associates for Consultation and Training)

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TAGS

1703 • 1815 • 19291959 • authentic practices • authenticity of thingsballpoint pen • bark • chalkconservative attitudesconstantly evolving technological platformcultural understanding of technologydistruste-learning • educational change • emerging technologiesfear of technologyinstrumental conception of technologylearning and teachinglooking backwards to the futureluddite • meaningful learning experiences • mistrust • naive perspectives • no batteries requiredorthodoxypaperparadigm shiftpen and inkpen and paper • resistance to change • resistant behaviourritualskeptical perspectiveskepticismslatestudent learning • teacher professionalism • teachingtechnical skilltechnological advancementstechnology and its impacttechnology as neutraltraditional processtraditional techniques • try out new ideas • unhealthy suspicion • use of technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2012

Graphic Design Communication students recreate an ornamental display font through contemporary and traditional processes

"Stage one Graphic Design Communication students have been developing a new ornamental display font with highly Individual characters inspired by drawing digitally and laser cut manufactured to the exacting standards reminiscent of a traditional font foundry.

Level tutor Nigel Bents and Associate Lecturer Paul Oakley will further support students by printing typographic posters at the New North Press."

(Graphic Design Communication at Chelsea College of Art and Design, 16 October 2011)

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TAGS

Adobe Illustratoralphabetbeing smart with technology • Bodoni • Chelsea College of Art and Design • compositor • contemporary font design • craftcraft nostalgiacraft skillscreative practicedesignerdisplay fontdrawing digitallyearly twentieth centuryfont • font design • graphic design communication • hybrid processindividual character • laser cut • laser cuttingmovable typenew crafts • New North Press • new techniques • Nigel Bents • ornamental • ornamental alphabet • ornamental display font • ornamental font • Paul Oakley • posterprintingprinting processrecreationrendered on the screenskillsstudentstechniquetechnology • traditional font foundry • traditional practicestraditional processtype • type founding • typographertypographic postertypographyUKvisual communicationwoodblock printing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 FEBRUARY 2012

Upside Down, Left To Right: A Letterpress Film

"A short documentary film about letterpress and one of the few remaining movable–type printing workshops in the UK, situated at Plymouth University, featuring Paul Collier."

(Danny Cooke)

Fig.1 A film by Danny Cooke dannycooke.co.uk, soundtrack by Tony Higgins tonyhiggins.org.

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TAGS

Adobe Illustrator • alloy • bookscraftcultural technologyDanny Cookedesign processdevicegraphic designhand-crafted typeinkJohannes Gutenbergletteringletterpresslithographymaterialitymechanical • metal • metal type • movable metal • movable typepagesetting • Paul Collier • Plymouth University • press • printingprinting press • printing workshops • processpublishingshort documentaryshort filmtactile • tactile process • technical process • technologytraditiontraditional processtraditional techniquestypetypographyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2009

The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

"Our fine arts were developed, their types and uses were established, in times very different from the present, by men whose power of action upon things was insignificant in comparison with ours. But the amazing growth of our techniques, the adaptability and precision they have attained, the ideas and habits they are creating, make it a certainty that profound changes are impending in the ancient craft of The Beautiful. In all the arts there is a physical component which can no longer be considered or treated as it used to be, which cannot remain unaffected by our modern knowledge and power. For the last twenty years neither matter nor space nor time has been what it was from time immemorial. We must expect great innovations to transform the entire technique of the arts, thereby affecting artistic invention itself and perhaps even bringing about an amazing change in our very notion of art."

(Walter Benjamin, 1935, quoted from Paul Valery, Aesthetics, The Conquest of Ubiquity)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2005

Industrialisation: Pin Making and the Division of Labour

"To take an example, therefore, from a very trifling manufacture but one in which the division of labour has been very often taken notice of, the trade of the pin–maker; a workman not educated to this business (which the division of labour has rendered a distinct trade), nor acquainted with the use of the machinery employed in it (to the invention of which the same division of labour has probably given occasion), could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry make one pin in a day, and certainly could not make twenty. But in the way in which this business is now carried on, not only the whole work is a peculiar trade, but it is divided into a number of branches, of which the greater part are likewise peculiar trades. One man draws out the wire, another straightens it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head: to make the head requires two or three distinct operations to put it on, is a peculiar business, to whiten the pins another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them. I have seen a small manufactory of this kind where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day. There are in a pound upward of four thousand pins of a middling size. Those ten persons, therefore, could make among them upward of forty–eight thousand pins in a day. Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty–eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day; that is, certainly not the two hundred and fortieth, perhaps not the four thousand eight hundredth part of what they are at present capable of performing, in consequence of proper division and combination of their different operations."

(Adam Smith, 1776)

Fig.1 Title: "Epinglier, Plate II (Pin Making)", Engraver: Defehrt, Designer: Goussier, Date: 1762, Medium: Original Engraving, Art of the Print (Defehrt – Diderot's Encyclopedie), [http://www.artoftheprint.com/artistpages/defehrt_epinglier_pl2.htm].

[Smith's theory of specialisation has come to dominate Western economic theory in the 200 years since it was first published.]

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TAGS

177618th centuryAdam Smithbusinessdivision of labourindustrialisationindustrymanufactories • manufacture • manufacturingmass productionpin • pin-maker • servile artsskillspecialisationtraditional process • workman
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