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Which clippings match 'Marketplace' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 DECEMBER 2013

Orson Welles laments his career and struggles with Hollywood

An interview with Orson Welles taped on 3rd October 1985.

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TAGS

1985black hat characterCitizen Kanecompromisecreative vision • film actor • film directorfilm industryHollywoodinfluential directorinterview • lamentation • life stories • marketplacemodern worldmovie-makingOrson Wellespersonal and professional needspersonal creative interests • personal insight • personal reflections • reflection and criticism • regret • ridiculous business • romantic notion of the artisttelevision interviewwhite hat character

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2011

The adult business fuels a lot of mainstream technology growth

Jason Tucker: "the mainstream has learned a lot from the adult business. The adult business fuels a lot of the growth of technology that exists on the internet. From streaming video, from content delivery vehicles, from content delivering networks, dealing with bottlenecks on the internet because there are so many people going to a specific ite, distributing that around. From that it's now...and then also the basic business models, the how to transact, the per click, the per impression, the upsell concept. That all came from the adult business."

(Robin Benger, 2009)

Extract transcript from extended interview with Jason Tucker (CEO Falcon Enterprises) and video interview from: Robin Benger (2009). "Porndemic", Cogent/Benger Productions.

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2009 • adult business • adult company • Adult FriendFinder • BitTorrentbusiness modelcontent deliveryDigital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) • digital sexual experience • disruptive innovation • electronic pornography • erotic library • Falcon Enterprises • image identificationimage library • internet generation • Internet porn • Jason Tucker • killing time content • Larry Flynt • mainstream • marketplacemovie businessownership • pay site • pay-per-click • pay-per-impression • pay-per-view • Penthouse (magazine) • picture gallery • Playboy (magazine) • porn industry • porn library • Porndemic (2009) • pornographyre-publish • Robin Benger • sex industry • stealing content • Steve Hirsch • streaming videotelevision documentary • tube sites • upselling • vertical market • video gallery • video on demand • Vivid Entertainment Group • Wicked Pictures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2009

Design Thinking: a methodology that imbues the full spectrum of innovation activities with a human-centred design ethos

"Design thinking is ... a discipline that uses the designer's sensibility and methods to match people's needs with what is technologically feasible and what a viable business strategy can convert into customer value and market opportunity. Like [Thomas] Edison's painstaking innovation process, it often entails a great deal of perspiration. ...

Historically, design has been treated as a downstream step in the development process – the point where designers, who have played no earlier role in the substantive work of innovation, come along and put a beautiful wrapper around the idea. To be sure, this approach has stimulated market growth in many areas by making new products and technologies aesthetically attractive and therefore more desirable to consumers or by enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising and communication strategies. During the latter half of the twentieth century design became an increasingly valuable competitive asset in, for example, the consumer electronics, automotive, and consumer packaged goods industries. But in most others it remained a late–stage add–on.

Now, however, rather than asking designers to make an already developed idea more attractive to consumers, companies are asking them to create ideas that better meet consumers' needs and desires. The former role is tactical, and results in limited value creation; the latter is strategic, and leads to dramatic new forms of value."

(Tim Brown, 2008, Harvard Business Review)

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TAGS

2008 • aesthetically attractive • applied researchbest practicebrand perceptionbusiness machine • business savvy • business sense • business world • communication strategiescompetitive advantageconsumer desireconsumer electronics • consumer packaged goods • consumerscreativity • customer value • design ideasdesign methodologydesign methodsdesign thinkingdesigners • designers sensibility • development process • dictation • direct observationdiscovery through design • discrete device • electric light bulb • electric power generation • electric power transmission • envisionevocative advertisingexperimental investigationgeneralistgenius • gifted tinkerers • Harvard Business Reviewhuman-centred designhumanisation of technologyIDEOimprovisationinnovation • innovation activities • innovation processintegrationinventioninventoriterative designlightbulblone genius • market growth • market opportunity • marketplace • Menlo Park • needs and desires • new forms of value • new productsnew technologies • parlour trick • phonograph • prescient • product differentiation • products are made • products are marketed • products are packaged • products are sold • products are supported • recording dictation • replaying dictation • research and development • research and development laboratory • strategic thinking • substantive work of innovation • team-based approach • technologically feasible • Thomas Edison • trial and error • twentieth century • viable business strategy • what people want

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 AUGUST 2005

Enterprise Webs: A Recombinant Business Structure

"The most radical [form of virtual organisation] is the Enterprise Web [1][2], which describes where a number of partners come together around a core technology or competence, to deliver new products or services into the marketplace. One of the most challenging aspects of the Enterprise Web is the issue of knowledge management and information transfer among the partners. The success of any Web enterprise will only come through optimising the learning processes of the Web to ensure the next generation of products and services.[1]Lorenzoni, G., Baden–Fuller C. (1995) Creating a strategic center to manage a web of partners, California Management Review (Reprint Series), 37 (3), by Regents of the University of California, Berkeley, pp. 146–163.[2]Hagel, J. (1996). Spider versus spider. McKinsey Quarterly, (1), 4–18.

Enterprise Webs are business alliances that form to mitigate risk. One of their core features is their ability to re–configure themselves to take advantage of changing economic opportunities. Their structure allows their members to both benefit from the flexibility of small business, while providing the benefit of being part of a larger economic unit. Alliances are usually created through the association of businesses providing complementary services."
(Alistair Campbell)

Jackson, Paul ed.. 1999 Virtual Working –Social and Organisational Dynamics, , : Routledge. 0415200881

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TAGS

enterprise webKMknowledge managementmarketplacemodular organisation • modular organisational structure • organisational modularity • partner • recombinant business structure • transfer
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