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Which clippings match 'Manuscript' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 APRIL 2013

Chinese bookbinding contained in the Dunhuang collection

"The history of Chinese bookbinding has always suffered owing to a lack of material evidence. The various book formats discovered among the Dunhuang document collection provide a wealth of information previously out of reach to scholars. However, this resource has remained relatively untapped, attention instead being focused on the textual content of the documents. Bookbinding is just one of many aspects to the study of the Dunhuang collection as physical artefacts. This site, by combining textual descriptions with diagrams illustrating binding techniques and photographs of the actual objects, aims to give a comprehensive introduction to the different kinds of Chinese bookbinding contained in the Dunhuang collection of the British Library."

(Colin Chinnery, 07 February 2007)

Fig.2 Stein's 1907 photograph of Tibetan pothi from the Dunhuang Library Cave. © 2007 The British Library, Photo 392/27(587) [http://idp.bl.uk/database/oo_scroll_h.a4d?uid=186402700912;bst=1;recnum=38614;index=1;img=1]

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TAGS

ancient documents • baobei zhuang • bindingbookbookbindingbookletBritish LibraryBuddhist • butterfly binding • Central Asia • Chinese pothi • colophon • concertina binding • concertina format • conservationcultural heritage • Diamond Sutra • Dunhuang • East Silk Road • fanjia zhuang • fold • historical documents • hudie zhuang • IDP • International Dunhuang Project • jingzhe zhuang • Kharosthi • Khotan • manuscriptPeoples Republic of China • printed booklet • Sanskrit • Silk Road • stitched binding • Tangut • thread binding • Tibet • Turkic • UK • Uyghur • whirlwind binding • wrapped back binding • wrapped-back binding • xian zhuang • xuanfeng zhuang

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

New Zealand National Library and the Alexander Turnbull Library

"We're in Beta, and we're excited to share this new National Library website with you. Why are we so excited? For the first time you can search right across our collections in one place. It's easier to get what you're after and easier to use it."

(The Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs Te Tari Taiwhenua)

Fig.1 Ref: 1/2–220232–F, Portrait of girl with fan, 1968, photographed by K E Niven & Co of Wellington.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

Connected Histories: digital resources of early modern and 19th century Britain

"Connected Histories brings together a range of digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain with a single federated search that allows sophisticated searching of names, places and dates, as well as the ability to save, connect and share resources within a personal workspace."

(University of Hertfordshire, University of London, University of Sheffield, 2011)

Fig.1 "The photograph shows the beach at Cromer in Norfolk, which features in Emma (1816) as 'The best of all the sea–bathing places'. A small fishing village then, noted for its crabs, by 1887 the railway had arrived. The pier (which still stands) was built in 1901." Martin (Manuscripts Cataloguer), Caird Library

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TAGS

19th century2011Bodleian LibraryBritainBritish history • British Origins • Connected Histories • conservationcultural heritagecultural representationsdigital heritagedigital resourcesdigitisationearly modern periodEconomic and Social Research Council • eContent • everyday lifefamily historygenealogy • Higher Education Digitisation Service • history • HRI Online Publications • Humanities Research Institute • ICT • Irish Origins • JISC • John Johnson Collection • John Strype • Leverhulme Trust • London Lives • manuscriptmapsmuseologynational cultural heritage online • National Wills Index • nineteenth century • Origins.net • personal workspace • plates • preservation • printed ephemera • ProQuest • Scots Origins • searchsearch toolshare resources • Stuart London • taxonomyUKUniversity of HertfordshireUniversity of LondonUniversity of NottinghamUniversity of Sheffield

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2009

ontology: singular and multiple forms of art

"Such attention to practice creates considerable pressure to adopt at least a dualist ontology of art, in the sense that our practices appear to embed a distinction between singular and multiple forms of art. Singular artworks are unique, occurring at only one place at a time. Paintings, collages, carved sculptures, and Polaroids are typical examples of singular works. Multiple artworks are those which are capable of having more than one occurrence in different places at the same time. For example, a novel may have many copies, a play many performances, a film many screenings, and a photograph many prints. Each of the occurrences is, in some way, a full–fledged presentation of the work.

This distinction appears to doom the simplest thought, that all works of art are physical particulars. It may be plausible to claim that a painting is a particular material object, or that a jazz performance is a particular physical event, but one cannot identify Alfred Steiglitz's photograph The Steerage with any one of its prints or Peter Schaffer's play Equus with any one of its performances. As Wollheim (1980) first pointed out, the occurrences are potentially many, and one thing cannot be identical to many distinct things. So too, such works survive the destruction or passing of their occurrences, even such epistemologically privileged occurrences as manuscripts and holographs. They must be some other sort of thing."

(Paul Redding)

Fig.1 Stieglitz, Alfred. The Steerage, 1907

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1907Alfred Stieglitzartartworkcarved sculpturecarvingcollagecreative practicecritical theorydualism • Equus • essential uniquenessholographimmigrantjazz performance • Jewish photographer • manuscriptmaterial objectmateriality • multiple • multiple artworks • multiple forms of art • occurrence • ontologypaintingperformance • Peter Schaffer • photograph • photographic prints • physical eventPolaroid • prints • simultaneity • singular • singular artworks • singular forms of art • singular works • uniquework of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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