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Which clippings match 'Manhattan' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 JUNE 2014

Nothing Lasts Forever: a low budget parody about a struggling artist

"Writer–director Schiller is best known for his short films from the early days of SNL and in 1984, together with producer Lorne Michaels, concocted this imaginative fantasy–comedy about true love, bad art, magical hobos, Carnegie Hall and space travel. Sweet, absurd and crammed with an incredible cast and countless hilarious moments of inspired brilliance, it was never released and never found the cult–audience it so rightfully deserved."

(Zack Carlson, 16 December 2012)

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TAGS

1984 • Alles Ist Verganglich (1984) • anti-consumerist • Apollonia Van Ravenstein • art test • artistauthoritarianism • becoming an artist • Bill Murrayblack and whiteblack humourbus • Calvert Deforest • Carnegie Hallconceptual artcult film • Dan Aykroyd • dream sequence • Eddie Fisher • forgotten works • Holland Tunnel • Imogene Coca • kindness • Lauren Tom • Lawrence Tierney • Lorne Michaels • low budgetManhattan • Marc Alderman • melange • menial job • moon • Mort Sahl • New YorkNew York City • Nothing Lasts Forever (1984) • Odessa Stepsparodypasticheperformance art • Port Authority • repurposingromantic notion of the artist • Sam Jaffe • Saturday Night Livespace travel • starving artist • stock footage • struggling artist • Tom Schiller • tramp • treadmill • underground culture • unreleased films • Zach Galligan

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2014

Handwritten directions from strangers used to map Manhattan

"A map of Manhattan composed of hand–drawn maps by various New York pedestrians whom the artist asked for directions.

Pretending to be a tourist by wearing a souvenir cap and carrying a shopping bag of Century 21, a major tourist shopping place, I ask various New York pedestrians to draw a map to direct me to another location. I connect and place these small maps based on actual geography in order to make them function as parts of a larger map."

(Nobutaka Aozaki, 2012)

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TAGS

2012around us • asking for directions • cartographycity maps • draw a map • geographical locationhand-drawnhand-drawn mapshand-scrawledlocation-specificManhattanmapmapmakingmappingNew YorkNew Yorker • Nobutaka Aozaki • outline drawing • pedestrian • personal cartographyphysical geographyphysical spaceplacerandomness • shopping bag • souvenir cap • spatial environments • tourist • urban mappingwayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2013

Jefferson Airplane Wakes Up New York; Jean-Luc Godard Captures It

"He took over from the specialists and operated the camera from the window of Leacock–Pennebaker's office on West Forty–fifth street, shooting the band on the roof of the Schuyler Hotel across the street. (Pennebaker recalled him to be an amateurish cameraman who could not avoid the beginner's pitfall of frequent zooming in and out.) The performance took place without a permit, at standard rock volume: as singer Grace Slick later wrote, 'We did it, deciding that the cost of getting out of jail would be less than hiring a publicist"

(via Open Culture, 24 February 2012)

Fig.1 Jean–Luc Godard filmed the band on a rooftop in Midtown Manhattan (December 7, 1968).

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1960s1968 • alternative zeitgeist • amateurish • amateurish cameraman • anti-mastery • band • cinematic zest • Donn A. Pennebaker • Film Socialisme (2010) • focus and zoom • footageFrench New Wave • Grace Slick • improvisationimprovised methodJean-Luc Godard • Jefferson Airplane • Leacock-Pennebaker • live performanceManhattan • Midtown Manhattan • New YorkOpen Culture (resource) • Paul Kantner • Richard Leacock • Schuyler Hotel • spectacle • The House at Pooneil Corners • West Forty-fifth street • zooming in and out

CONTRIBUTOR

David Reid
13 SEPTEMBER 2013

Mapping Manhattan: a public art project mapping personal experience

"Becky Cooper, a 24–year–old cartographer and writer... asked New Yorkers–and visitors–to map their own versions of Manhattan. She took to the streets, distributing 3,000 copies of a hand–printed outline of the island and encouraged participants to "map who you are or where you are; the invisible or the obvious". All copies were self–addressed and stamped so they could be mailed back to her.

Cooper says around 10% of the maps were mailed back and Mapping Manhattan features 75 of the best contributions. Some are heartbreaking (one person mapped key places in his life, from the first apartment he shared with his wife to where she later died); many invoke humour (a map of lost gloves, pictured above); some are confessions (a student who shows how she funded her studies with work at various strip joints). Some are handscrawled in biro, others are collages, and a few use watercolours."

(Vicky Baker, 15 May 2013, The Guardian)

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TAGS

2009 • Adam Gopnik • around us • Becky Cooper • belongingbirocartographycity mapscultural memorydaily activitydiversity of experienceshand-drawnhand-drawn maps • hand-printed outline • hand-scrawled • heartbreaking • juxtapositionlocation-specificManhattanmapmakingmapping • Mapping Manhattan (project) • memoryNew YorkNew Yorkeroutline drawingpathpersonal cartographypersonal experienceplacepublic artqualitative descriptionsrememberingspatial narrative • strip joint • territoryurban mappingwayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2011

Martin Scorsese: ItalianAmerican

"After having made four well–received feature films, among them Mean Streets (1973), an uncompromising story of petty criminals in New York City's Little Italy, and Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), the tale of a single mother's journey to self–sufficiency, Martin Scorsese stepped back briefly from his commercial film career to make a small, deeply personal documentary. Shot on 16mm film in the Manhattan apartment where he grew up, ItalianAmerican is the record of a conversation between Scorsese and his parents, Charles and Catherine. In three–quarters of an hour, the three manage to cover a great deal of ground, most notably the parents' experiences growing up in the rough–and–tumble New York tenements during the early years of the twentieth century. Scorsese's presentation of his parents is highly particularized and subtly nuanced, yet he also manages to make their words speak for the larger immigrant experience. When the setting shifts from the living room to the dining room and everyone sits down to dinner, the mood becomes looser and more animated, with Scorsese and his mother moving into the kitchen for a quick lesson on how to make tomato sauce–or 'gravy,' as Catherine (and an entire generation of Italian Americans) would call it. Throughout, the affection that the three Scorseses have for each other is palpable, as is the respect with which the son presents his parents' story. At the end, Catherine's recipe for her tomato sauce scrolls by on–screen, making ItalianAmerican not only a historical record, but also a family legacy."

(The Museum of Modern Art)

1974. USA. 35mm print, colour, sound, 49 min. Original 16mm materials on indefinite loan from the artist. Preserved in 35mm with funding from the Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Fund.

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TAGS

16mm1974authorship • Catherine Scorsese • Charles Scorsese • direct cinemadocumentary filmfilmimmigrantimmigrant experienceinterviewItalian • Italian American • Italianamerican (1974) • ManhattanMartin ScorseseNew Yorkpersonalpersonal filmrealismsocial historysocial realismsocial realitytruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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