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17 JANUARY 2013

The Qualitative Research Interview

"While all interviews are used to get to know the interviewee better, the purpose of that knowing varies according to the research question and the disciplinary perspective of the researcher. Thus, some research is designed to test a priori hypotheses, often using a very structured interviewing format in which the stimulus (questions) and analyses are standardised, while other research seeks to explore meaning and perceptions to gain a better understanding and/or generate hypotheses. This latter research generally requires some form of qualitative interviewing which encourages the interviewee to share rich descriptions of phenomena while leaving the interpretation or analysis to the investigators. The purpose of the qualitative research interview is to contribute to a body of knowledge that is conceptual and theoretical and is based on the meanings that life experiences hold for the interviewees. In this article we review different qualitative interview formats with a focus on the face–to–face, in–depth qualitative research interview and conclude with a discussion of related technical and ethical issues."

(Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree, 2006)

Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree (2006). "The Qualitative Research Interview", Medical Education, Volume 40, Issue 4, pages 314–321, Wiley Online Library

TAGS

a priori hypotheses • Barbara DiCicco-Bloom • Benjamin Crabtree • body of knowledge • disciplinary perspective • ethical issues • explore meaning • explore perceptions • face-to-faceface-to-face interview • generate hypotheses • in-depth interview • interpretationinterview (research method)interviewinginterviews • investigators • life experiences • qualitative data • qualitative interview formats • qualitative interviewing • qualitative interviewsqualitative research • qualitative research interview • researchresearch interviewsresearch questionrich descriptions • standardised data • structured interviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2012

Qualitative Research Methods: interview questions

"Basic descriptive questions
Can you talk to me about your car accident? Tell me what happened on that evening?
Describe how you felt that evening?

Follow–up questions
You mentioned that 'planning time' is important to you. Can you tell me how you use planning time?

Experience/example questions
You mentioned that you loved going to London. Can you give me an example or two of what made you love London?
Talk about your impressions of London.

Simple clarification questions
You have used the term 'constructivist teacher' today. Can you clarify that for me? What exactly can you talk about regarding your constructivist teaching?

Structural/paradigmatic questions
You state that this class was a problematic one. What would you describe as the cause of these problems?
Of all the things you have told me about being a critical care nurse, what is the underlying premise of your work day? In other words, what keeps you going everyday?

Comparison/contrast questions
You said there was a big difference between a great principal and an ordinary principal. What are some of these differences? Can you describe a few for me?"

(Hora Tjitra, Slide 12)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2012

The Family Factory: Developing Methods for Live 3D Animation

"In this way the puppeteers would be part of the development of the prototypes for the virtual puppets as well as the characters for the play, before the actual rehearsals would begin two month later. ...

The value of the actual meetings and workshops can not be emphasised enough. This gave the participants hands on experience with the constraints in the actual equipment and a chance to meet the team that would be responsible for operating it. It is not until the artist has a very physical and intuitive impression of the material and the involved people the creative process takes off for real–before this everything is abstract ideas. ...

In the planning of the research project and the actual production the division of labour within and between each field of activity were specified as outlined in section 3.

As the process went on the borders became more blurred exploring the new field between creative production in theatre and animation and methods from computer science and systems development. One of the big challenges was the development of a common language between the artist and the programmer/technicians and to define and invent new methods that were necessary to carry out the production.

I tried to explore the numerous reasons for this in the evaluation phase of the project. This was done by conducting qualitative interviews with the participants and by reviewing the large body of video documentation from the process. The footage was edited to a 50 minute documentary about the project on which the following assumptions are based (Callesen 2001)."

(Jørgen Callesen, 2003, p.15,18,30)

Callesen (2001) Virtual Puppets in Performance, Proceedings, Marionette: Metaphysics, Mechanics, Modernity, International Symposium, University of Copenhagen, 28. March – 1. April, 2001

Callesen, J. (2003) "The Family Factory – Developing new Methods for Live 3D Animation" in Madsen, K.H. Production methods: behind the scenes of virtual inhabited 3D worlds. Springer–Verlag, London.

TAGS

3D animation • abstract ideas • actual equipment • actual production • applied researchartistic practice • computer science methods • conceptualisationconstraintscreative practicecreative process • creative production in theatre • enquiry • evaluation phase • experimentation • field of activity • hands on experience • intuitive impression of the material • new methodsparticipantsperformance • physical impression of the material • planningPRAMnetprototype • prototype development • puppetpuppeteerqualitative interviewsresearchresearch project • reviewing • systems development • theatretheory buildingvideo documentationvirtual puppetworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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