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Which clippings match 'Physical And Digital Interaction' keyword pg.1 of 2
03 OCTOBER 2014

Ototo: bespoke musical instruments with pocket-sized circuit board

"Ototo–a pocket–sized circuit board in the mold of the Arduino and MaKey MaKey that was was designed to be a 'musical invention kit' and helps kids build bespoke electronic instruments without writing a line of code or burning a single finger on a soldering iron. It can play music out of the box with the 12 black and white triangles acting like piano keys and a surface–mounted speaker emitting sound, but it's killer application is the ability to create outlandish orchestras by connecting it to funky objects with alligator clips. Plants become percussive instruments, sauce pans become a drum set, and even simple pencil sketches can produce unique sounds when tapped."

(Joseph Flaherty, 22 October 2013, Wired)

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alligator clip • analogue correspondenceArduino • bespoke instruments • bespoke musical instruments • circuit boardcommonplace objectscreative playcreative technology • crocodile clip • design and technologydevicedo-it-yourselfgadget • gizmo • interaction designinteractive objects • Joseph Pleass • Kickstarterkit • low-tech music • MaKey MaKey • Mark McKeague • music making technologyOtotoout-of-the-boxphysical and digital interactionpocket-sized circuit boardsound generatorsound toytechnology for engagementThereminWired (magazine)Yuri Suzuki

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2014

How do we create things together in a shared environment?

"When critical thinking is at its strongest, it often comes from exactly the sort of fluidity of practice that does run through Digital Revolution. The London–based architect and artist Usman Haque has been creating innovative software products alongside interactive artworks for more than 15 years. In 2007, he founded Pachube, a global data–sharing network that anticipated by years the current buzz around big data and the internet of things. In 2011, Pachube enabled hundreds of Japanese civilians to quickly and easily share weather and radiation data in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, boosting monitoring and relief efforts. Haque's Umbrellium team has produced a new artwork for Digital Revolution, which takes up the entirety of The Pit, the Barbican's subterranean theatre space. Called Assemblance, the piece allows about 25 people at a time to physically shape beams of light with their hands, pushing and pulling them around the space–while also bumping into and potentially messing up the shapes created by other people.

Haque calls it 'a virtual reality', but not in the sense of a purely digital realm: 'It's there, it's responding to you, you can see it, but as you try and approach it you can't actually feel it. For me, the idea is to question this distinction between the physical and the virtual.' The process is akin to building a sandcastle on the beach, where you are building a structure that anyone else, or the elements, can destroy in a moment.

Assemblance attempts to answer the question: 'How do we create things together in a shared environment, where we can't always trust each other, but we need to act together regardless?' This, indeed, is the situation we find ourselves in now. In the modern digital world, the question of participation is crucial as our various networks–social, media, national–require us to constantly mediate between acting as individuals and acting as a group. For Haque, the digital has given us 'the capacity to have an effect on the other side of the world almost instantaneously', from news events and economic flows to disaster response and warfare. 'We can do things to other people in distant lands, and so the question of our responsibility, and our culpability, is thrown up in ways that it hasn't been before. On the other hand, we now have the capacity to connect with each other, and develop new ways to work together, rather than against each other.'

Assemblance asks the audience to see itself as part of a networked whole, where actions have consequences. It also points towards the fact that 'the digital' is not a medium, but a context, in which new social, political and artistic forms arise. After 50 years, at least, of digital practice, institutions are still trying to work out its relevance, and how to display and communicate it–a marker, perhaps, that it is indeed a form of art."

(James Bridle, 18 June 2014, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Assemblance, a 3D interactive light field by Usman Haque and Dot Samsen from Umbrellium. Photograph: Umbrellium.

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2014 • act together • acting as a group • actions have consequencesartwork • Assemblance (artwork) • Barbican Centre • beam of light • big data • capacity to connect • collaborative action • collective culpability • collective responsibility • creating things together • data sharing • data-sharing network • digital artdigital art exhibitiondigital art form • digital context • digital practicedigital revolutionDigital Revolution (2014) • Dot Samsen • economic flowsflowsFukushimaGoogle DevArtimmersive experienceimmersive worksindividual and collective activities • innovative software • interactive artworks • interactive light fieldinternet of thingslightlight artlight installationlight sculpturemediated interactionmediated reality • modern digital world • new ways of working together • Pachube • part of a networked whole • participationphysical and digital interactionPongresponsive light installation • sandcastle • shared environment • trustUmbrellium • Usman Haque

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2014

inFORM: prototype for a Dynamic Shape Display

"inFORM is a Dynamic Shape Display that can render 3D content physically, so users can interact with digital information in a tangible way. inFORM can also interact with the physical world around it, for example moving objects on the table's surface. Remote participants in a video conference can be displayed physically, allowing for a strong sense of presence and the ability to interact physically at a distance."

(Daniel Leithinger, Sean Follmer, Alex Olwal, Akimitsu Hogge, Hiroshi Ishii, 2013)

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2013 • Akimitsu Hogge • Alex Olwal • applied research • computationally reconfigurable • computationally transformable • computer-mediated interaction • Daniel Leithinger • digital states • direct interactiondisplay device • dynamic shape display • form and appearancefuture interaction concepts • future materials • Hiroshi Ishii • human-material interaction • inFORM (prototype) • interact with digital information • interactive surfaceinteractive table • Material User Interface (MUI) • materialitiesMIT Media Lab • MIT Media Lab Tangible Media Group • physical and digital interaction • physical form • physical manifestation • radical atoms • reconfigurable material • remote communicationremote partner • Sean Follmer • sense of presence • shapes and formsshapeshiftingshaping our relationship to the material worldtabletoptactile communication • tangible bits • tangible computingtangible interfacestangible visualisationtechnology affordances • transformable material • world around us

CONTRIBUTOR

Alex Sisan
21 OCTOBER 2013

Arduino can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators

"Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open–source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand–alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open–source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment."

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32-bit • 8-bitAdobe Flash • Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) • Arduino • Arduino programming language • Atmel ARM • Atmel AVR • computing platform • controller • David Cuartielles • David Mellis • development environmentDIYelectronics • Gianluca Martino • IDEinput deviceinteractive objects • Massimo Banzi • Max (software)Max/MSPmicrocontrollermicrocontroller boardminimalist electronica • multimedia programming environment • open source platformopen-source hardwarephysical and digital interactionphysical computing • physical computing platform • physical worldpocket-sized circuit boardProcessing (software)programming languageprototyping platformsensor • Tom Igoe • Wiring (software library) • writing software

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
22 OCTOBER 2012

Connecting Cities: Artist's Call for Proposals

"The European Urban Media Network for Connecting Cities is a project initiated by Public Art Lab in co–operation with Ars Electronica GmbH Linz, BIS Body Process Arts Association Istanbul, FACT Liverpool, iMAL Brussels, m–cult Helsinki, Medialab Prado Madrid, Media Architecture Institute Wien, Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb, Riga 2014, Videospread Marseille, in association with University of Aarhus, Marseille–Provence 2013 and MUTEK Montréal and funded by the European Union.

Our aim is to create a networked infrastructure of urban media facades to circulate artistic and socio–cultural content throughout the whole of Europe. Media facades and digital big screens provide new opportunities for communication in the public space. Through modern Information and communication technologies (ICT), they are membranes between the digital and the urban spaces. All over the world we can evidence an increase of urban screens, media facades and media technologies like mobile phones: 5,9 of 7 billion people have meanwhile access to the internet. What is the potential of urban media besides the commercial usage for advertisement? How can they catalyse communication and awareness of our environments and contribute to a lively society? How can we create an exchange between local scenes and neighbourhoods thus giving a voice to the public audience? Which impact will they have for our global communities?"

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Aarhus • Ars Electronica • Ars Electronica GmbH Linz • augmented spaceBerlin • big screens • BIS Body Process Arts Association Istanbul • Brussels • connecting cities • Connecting Cities (project) • digital cultureEuropean Union • European Urban Media Network Connecting Cities • FACT Liverpool • global communitiesHelsinki • iMAL Brussels • information in contextIstanbulLinz • lively society • Liverpool • m-cult Helsinki • Madrid • Marseille • Marseille-Provence 2013 • Media Architecture Institute Wien • media facades • media technologies • Medialab Prado Madrid • membrane • mobile phones • Montreal • Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb • MUTEK Montrea • neighbourhood • networked infrastructure • physical and digital interaction • Public Art Lab • public audience • public space • Riga • Riga 2014 • socio-cultural • socio-cultural content • University of Aarhus • urban media • urban media facades • urban screens • urban spaceurban spacesurban speculation • Videospread Marseille • Viennavisual communicationvisual designvisual spectaclevisualisationZagreb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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