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19 AUGUST 2014

Animated Women UK: positively supporting, representing, celebrating and encouraging women in the UK animation and visual effects (VFX) industries

"We want women from all backgrounds of the industry and at every stage in their career to fulfil their potential and realise their dreams. We value openness, honesty and a positive approach towards collaborating with women and mean across the UK to achieve our mission.

Our vision is to see a change in the UK's animation and VFX industries. We want to support a network of women who can help each other achieve success at every stage of the animation or VFX pipeline. This change will be visible when we see results such as: better female characters on screen, an increase in women–led start–ups and an increase in women winning awards in technical areas."

TAGS

2013 • Animated Women UK • animation and VFX • animation industrycreative industriescreative networksdesign professionalsdesign showcase • female animators • female characters • Lindsay Watson • London International Animation Festival • mentoring • Mind Candy • MPC (Moving Picture Company) • network of women • networking events • professional networking • professional supportrecognition of womenUKUK animationVFX industriesvisual effects designvisual effects industrywomen designerswomen in animationwomen in designwomen in film • Women in Film and TV • women in technical areas • women in technologywomen in the film industry • women in visual effects • women winning awards • women-led start-ups • workshop for women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MARCH 2014

The Barbican Centre Presents: Joy Batchelor - Life in Animation

An event and films curated by Vivian Halas and guests: 4pm / ScreenTalk with Vivian Halas, Clare Kitson, Jez Stewart and Brian Sibley, Thursday 13 April 2014. Barbican Centre, Silk Street London, EC2Y 8DS

"Joy Batchelor was one of the pioneering creative and commercial forces in UK animation with her output of witty public service short films after the second world war, as well as the BAFTA nominated Animal Farm adapted from the novel by George Orwell.

This event, celebrating the centenary of her birth, looks at Joy's life as both a professional co–running a creative studio and her role as a mother."

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TAGS

2014Animal Farm (1954)animationBarbican Centre • Birds Eye View Film Festival • book illustration • Brian Sibley • British animation • Clare Kitson • creative studio • George OrwellHalas and Batchelorillustrator • Jez Stewart • Joy BatchelorLondonpioneering animatorpioneering womenpublic information film • public service short films • traditional animationUKUK animationVivien Halaswomen designerswomen illustratorswomen in animationwomen in designwomen in film

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 DECEMBER 2012

Influential American experimental cinema: Meshes of the Afternoon

"Meshes of the Afternoon is one of the most influential works in American experimental cinema. A non–narrative work, it has been identified as a key example of the 'trance film,' in which a protagonist appears in a dreamlike state, and where the camera conveys his or her subjective focus. The central figure in Meshes of the Afternoon, played by Deren, is attuned to her unconscious mind and caught in a web of dream events that spill over into reality. Symbolic objects, such as a key and a knife, recur throughout the film; events are open–ended and interrupted. Deren explained that she wanted 'to put on film the feeling which a human being experiences about an incident, rather than to record the incident accurately.'

Made by Deren with her husband, cinematographer Alexander Hammid, Meshes of the Afternoon established the independent avant–garde movement in film in the United States, which is known as the New American Cinema. It directly inspired early works by Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, and other major experimental filmmakers. Beautifully shot by Hammid, a leading documentary filmmaker and cameraman in Europe (where he used the surname Hackenschmied) before he moved to New York, the film makes new and startling use of such standard cinematic devices as montage editing and matte shots. Through her extensive writings, lectures, and films, Deren became the preeminent voice of avant–garde cinema in the 1940s and the early 1950s."

(MoMA, 2004)

The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999.

Maya Deren (1943). "Meshes of the Afternoon", 16mm film, black and white, silent, 14 min. Acquired from the Artist.

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TAGS

16mm1943 • Alexander Hackenschmied • Alexander Hammid • American cinemaavant-garde cinemablack and whiteBolexcinemacinematic devicescloakdeathdream • dream world • dreamlike qualityeditingexperimental cinemaexperimental film • experimental filmmaker • filmfilm pioneerfilmmakerflowerFreudianindependent cinemainfluential directorinfluential worksKenneth Angerkeyknife • matte • Maya Deren • Meshes of the Afternoon • mirrorMoMA • New American Cinema • non-narrativeopen-endedpersonal filmrecurring ideasrepetitionrhythmscreen-mediated virtual spaceseminalsilent filmstaircaseStan Brakhagesurrealist cinemasymbolic meaningsymbolism • Teiji Ito • tranceunconscious desires • unconscious meaning • women in filmwomen in historywordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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TAGS

2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2012

Women from all different background and experiences came together for the common mission of using our voices to further the recognition of women as filmmaking leaders

"Women from all different background and experiences came together for the common mission of using our voices to further the recognition of women as filmmaking leaders. This short film was created and shot at POSH 2010 after lengthy discussions about our shared experiences in an industry dominate by men. The film showcases the talent, passion and emotional connection of women in the film industry with a positive and powerful message: We Create."

(Jennifer Moon and Reagan Zugelter)

Fig.1 Shot on location at POSH 2010, 'We Create' was directed by Maura Coleman–Murray and Kara Jensen, filmed by Maribeth Ratajczyk and Luiza Perkowska, and edited by Meg Simone. All 42 POSH 2010 attendees collaborated on the piece.

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TAGS

2010 • affirmation • authorship • common mission • different backgrounds • different experiences • emotional connection • filmfilm industryfilmmakersfilmmakingfilmmaking leadersgender • male dominated • passion • POSH 2010 • positive messages • powerful messages • recognition of womenshared experienceshort filmshowcasetalent • we create • womenwomen in filmwomen in the film industryworkshopworkshop for women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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