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06 DECEMBER 2013

Four-winged robot flies like a jellyfish

"Tiny flying robots usually mimic nature's flyers, like birds and insects–but perhaps that's due to a lack of imagination. A four–winged design created by Leif Ristroph and colleagues at New York University, which boasts a body plan reminiscent of a jellyfish, is more stable in the air than insect–like machines.

The prototype consists of a carbon–fibre frame surrounded by two pairs of thin plastic wings that open and close when driven by a motor. Its shape allows it to fly upright with little effort, without requiring sensors or intelligence to adjust its wings like those used by insects. 'Making a dumb machine is a nice strategy for very small robots,' says Ristroph. 'Without circuits and sensors, it's also lighter.'"

(Sandrine Ceurstemont, 25 November 2013, New Scientist)

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TAGS

2013 • American Physical Society • carbon-fibre frame • carried on the breeze • centimetre-scale • creaturedesign prototypedriftdrone • dumb machines • flappingfloatingflying • flying jellyfish • flying machine • flying robot • fruit flyhelicopter • insect-like machine • jellyfish • Leif Ristroph • New Scientist • New York University • plastic wings • robot • robot drone • robotic creature • self-stabilizing • small robot • tiny • wing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2012

The Revival of Psychogeography

"Psychogeography is hot. Guy Debord, founding member of Situationist International and the man who coined the term in 1955, defined the phenomenon as 'the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals'. In fact, psychogeography is the art of strolling, or just about anything that gets pedestrians off their predictable paths and leads them to a new awareness of the urban landscape. Recently we've seen a remarkable psychogeographic revival driven by several artistic urban projects and smartphone applications."

(Jeroen Beekmans, 4 January 2012, The Pop–Up City)

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TAGS

1955 • Adam Greenfield • Android appsappsart • art of strolling • artistic urban project • augmented reality • augmented sound • awarenesscitydaily routinederivedrift • Emilie Giles • encountersenvironmentescapeexploration • exploring the city • flaneur • forgotten places • geographical environment • Guy Debord • Inception app • Ingrid Burrington • interactive encounters • iPhoneiPhone app • iPhone apps • iPod Touch • Loneliness Map • lonely individuals • Lost London • mapmapping • missed connections • new technologiesperception of realityperformativityphenomena • Pratt Manhattan Gallery • predictable cities • psychogeographic experiences • psychogeographic explorations • psychogeographypublic spacerealityroute • Serendipitor • serendipitySituationist International • smartphone applications • smartphone apps • strollersurprisetechnology • unpredictable paths • urban landscapeurban mappingurban planningyou are here

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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