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Which clippings match 'Interdisciplinary Field' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 NOVEMBER 2013

Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln: Department of Hybrid Space

"A new interdisciplinary field of design, researching the transformations of architectural, urban/regional space of the emerging 'information age', explores the dynamic interaction of architecture/urbanism and the space of mass media and communication networks. It develops scenarios for the interplay of public urban and public media space. The products of these alliances of urban/regional and media networks, of architectural and media space, are bastards: ambivalent spaces that are at the same time analog and digital, tactile and abstract, material and immaterial, expanding hyper–sensuality in the time– and placelessness of media flows. These hybrid spatial morphs act simultaneously in urban (local) and media (global) space and mediate between them, unfolding the undefined space between the local and the global, occupying the vacuum between local place and global space. Within the inversions of identity (communication), within the fluid ever–changing densities in the knitted networks, fused analogue/digital cultures are idensified."

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TAGS

Academy of Media Arts Cologne • ambivalent spaces • analogue and digital • analogue and digital cultures • architectural conjecturearchitectural space • architectural transformations • architecturebastard • changing densities • Colognecommunication networksdesign coursedesign field • Elizabeth Sikiaridi • embodied interactionsflows • Frans Vogelaar • global space • glocalglocalizationhybrid spaces • hybrid spatial morphs • hyper-sensualityidentityidentity constructionimmaterialinformation ageinformation flows • interdisciplinary design • interdisciplinary field • knitted networks • Kunsthochschule fur Medien Koln • local place • local space • mass mediamaterialitymedia arts • media flows • media networksmedia spaceplacelessnesspublic space • public urban space • regional space • tactile experience • undefined space • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

Neurocinematics: The Neuroscience of Film

"This article describes a new method for assessing the effect of a given film on viewers' brain activity. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during free viewing of films, and inter–subject correlation analysis (ISC) was used to assess similarities in the spatiotemporal responses across viewers' brains during movie watching. Our results demonstrate that some films can exert considerable control over brain activity and eye movements. However, this was not the case for all types of motion picture sequences, and the level of control over viewers' brain activity differed as a function of movie content, editing, and directing style. We propose that ISC may be useful to film studies by providing a quantitative neuroscientific assessment of the impact of different styles of filmmaking on viewers' brains, and a valuable method for the film industry to better assess its products. Finally, we suggest that this method brings together two separate and largely unrelated disciplines, cognitive neuroscience and film studies, and may open the way for a new interdisciplinary field of 'neurocinematic' studies."

(Uri Hasson, Ohad Landesman et al.)

Hasson, U., Landesman, O., Knappmeyer, B., Vallines, I., Rubin, N. and Heeger, D. (2008), Neurocinematics: The neuroscience of films. Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind 2, 1–26.

TAGS

Barbara Knappmeyer • brain • brain activity • cognitive control • cognitive film theory • cognitive neuroscience • computational neuroscience • David J. Heeger • directing style • eye movement • eye-trackingfilm editingfilm industryfilm studies • film viewing • fMRI • functional magnetic resonance imaging • Ignacio Vallines • inter-subject correlation • inter-subject correlation analysis • interdisciplinary field • ISC • motion picture sequences • movie content • movie watching • Nava Rubin • neurocinematic studies • neurocinematicsneuroscience • neuroscience and film • neuroscience of film • Ohad Landesman • perception • Projections (journal) • psychophysics • quantitative neuroscientific assessment • similarities • social neuroscience • spatiotemporal responses • styles of filmmaking • Uri Hasson • viewerviewingvisionvisual perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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