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Which clippings match 'Loyalty' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 MAY 2011

How Unilever, Coke and the Mini car got it so wrong

"Even the biggest businesses can make big mistakes – and when they do, the result can be a commercial calamity. Companies are constantly striving to improve their products and turn a profit. But changing an existing product can go horribly wrong, leaving customers in revolt and companies in crisis. Mishandled marketing and bungling public relations can make the slickest of businesses look incompetent. And the costs both financially and to reputation can be enormous. Persil, Coca–Cola and the British Motor Corporation have provided some of the most extreme examples as Evan Davis has been finding out for a new BBC Two series."

(BBC News, 8 May 2011)

Business Nightmares with Evan Davis – Doomed Designs will be on BBC Two at 20:00 BST on Monday 9 May 2011

Fig.1 '2009 Mini Cooper Turns Fifty and is Younger than Ever', picture 09ELG550925430AC

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TAGS

195919851990s1994BBC • best-selling • blind taste test • BMC • British Motor Corporation • businesscarcelebrity endorsementCoca-Colacommodity • companies in crisis • customer revolt • customersenterprise • Evan Davis • failure • garmentinnovationJohn Lennon • low price • loyaltymarket dominancemarket leadermarket researchmarketing • Mini (car) • new and improved • New Generation Persil • original formula • original recipe • Pepsi • Pepsi Challenge • Persil • Persil Power • Peter SellersPolaroidpriceProcter and Gambleproductproduct change • product formula • profitpublic relationssoap • soft drink • Spike Milligan • stain • taste (sociology)UKUnilever • washing powder • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2009

Amazon Takes On Wikipedia With Editable Music Data

"Wikipedia is an undeniably helpful resource for researching bands, with fairly accurate data that tends to be updated in near real time. Amazon hopes the same sort of thing will happen on its new SoundUnwound site, which borrows a page from Wikipedia's playbook by allowing users to edit information about any band, label, album or song.
...
As with Wikipedia, users can edit this information, but not directly. All changes must be vetted by Amazon staff before appearing on the site...
...
Ultimately, the potential success of SoundUnwound depends on creating a loyal, enthusiastic community. Wikipedia will likely always contain more information than SoundUnwound, but Amazon staff might be able to shape user–provided information in such a way that some prefer it for musical research.

And when they find something they like, a row of Amazon "buy" buttons awaits."

(Eliot Van Buskirk, Wired.com)

TAGS

Amazon.combanddigital mediaenterpriseloyaltyownershipsocial media • SoundUnwound • user-provided information • Web 2.0Wikipedia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2005

Weblogs: Promoting Shared Business Context

"...think about the value of the Wall Street Journal to business leaders. The value it provides is context – the Journal allows readers to see themselves in the context of the financial world each day, which enables more informed decision making. With this in mind, think about your company as a microcosm of the financial world. Can your employees see themselves in the context of the whole company? Would more informed decisions be made if employees and leaders had access to internal news sources? Weblogs serve this need. By making internal websites simple to update, weblogs allow individuals and teams to maintain online journals that chronicle projects inside the company. These professional journals make it easy to produce and access internal news, providing context to the company – context that can profoundly affect decision making. In this way, weblogs allow employees and leaders to make more informed decisions through increasing their awareness of internal news and events."
(Lee LeFever, 2004/06/21 11:18 PM)

[his pitch argues a case for using Weblogs in a corporate setting. One could argue that their use in this context might provide a challenge to accepted corporate Intranet practices. Instead of such systems being provided as mechanisms for publishing (authorised) corporate 'news' they might instead provide a means for employees to 'feedback' and share their understandings with their peers. In this way weblogs would not only provide context but they could also help to promote corporate loyalty and team–building.]

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