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Which clippings match 'Design Collective' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 DECEMBER 2012

Privileging the collective: the tradition of the atelier method in art and design education

"Art and design education has broadly settled on two categories of pedagogical frameworks, both evolutions from historical precedents. The first of these categories is driven by the spirit of the 'design collective', and comprises the art school studio or atelier model. This was established by the private Florentine art schools of the renaissance from around the 15th Century (King, 2003), always with a focus on making as well as learning from the group – from both peers and Masters. Later, this model of learning through practice carried over to the art schools of England: in his 1858 inaugural address for the Cambridge School of Art, John Ruskin (Ruskin, 1858) spoke about the relative futility of formal teaching per se and instead the pressing need for students to learn by repeated and applied making. For applied craft and design, this studio approach was the method under the influential Bauhaus School (1919–1933) in Germany (Droste, 2005). The second category derives from the teaching of industrial arts and is typically driven by the far greater student volume processing needs of the institution. This category comprises the 'hot desking' or increasingly the 'no–desking' model, with large taught classes in lecture format, and occasional group tutorials. Such a model is often the norm for universities' academic courses. The model spread to the creative courses that were more typically offered by polytechnics in the UK. The first polytechnic dates back to the early nineteenth century (Fox, 1832–1854), although most were established in the 1960's with a remit of applied education in industry and science for work. In many countries, the term 'technical college' is the same as a polytechnic – in both the UK and Australia, many of these colleges converted into universities in the last 30 years."

(Ashley Hall and Tom Barker, 2010)

Hall, A. and T. Barker (2010). "Design collectives in education: evaluating the atelier format and the use of teaching narrative for collective cultural and creative learning, and the subsequent impact on professional practice". In Alternative Practices in Design: Past Present and Future. H. Edquist and L. Vaughan. Melbourne, Victoria, RMIT University: Design Research Institute.

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2010academic coursesapplied craft and designapprenticeshipart and design educationart schools • artists studio • atelier methodatelier modelbaseroomBauhaus School • Cambridge School of Art • craft and designcraft skills • creative courses • creativity skillsdesign and makingdesign collectivedesign educationdesign studio educationdistance learningEuropean RenaissanceFlorence • Florentine art schools • formal teaching • group tutorials • Guild system • hot desking • industrial artsindustrial design • industrial practices • John Makepeace • John Ruskinlearning model • learning through making • learning through practicelecture formatlecturers • no-desking • Oxfordshire • Parnham • pedagogical modelpolytechnicremote learning • Rycote Wood • self-learning • studiostudio approachstudio practice • taught classes • technical collegetutorialsUKvocational trainingWilliam Morris • working environment • workspace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JUNE 2012

Tape Art

"Watch what happened when Foot Locker and Converse invited a collective of street artists to create tape art installations inspired by the new Converse winter collection created for Foot Locker."

(Uploaded by footlocker on 15 Nov 2010)

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2010actual environmentadvertisingartworkback and forth • Chuck Taylor • Converse Inc • Converse Padded Collar 2 • creative advertisingcreative workdesign collectivedrawing • drawing with tape • extended play • Foot Locker • giant turntable • graffitigraphic artillusionillusionistic spaceillustrationillustrative stylemural • new Converse winter collection • painting as illusionperspectiveperspective viewscratchingstreet artstreet artistsstreetweartape • tape art • tape art installations • turntable • turntablist technique • vinyl recordvisual perspectivevisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Kay Van Bellen
16 DECEMBER 2011

TreatStudios: an anti-christmas surprise

"Treat is a loose collective of animators and illustrators, formed in 2008.

Many things have changed since then but not our love of making things move that aren't supposed to, e.g., Drawings, pictures, hearts, mountains, molehills, rock.

We've sprayed our work through TV, music videos, live visuals, installations and feature films. We like to illustrate as much as animate so that's another reason for us to exist, and we are happier for it.

We all have different ways of making so our work is an eclectic mix of styles that somehow fit together and help one another progress and vibrate into new and exciting structures."

(TreatStudios)

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20082D2D animationamazementanimationanimatoranti-christmas • Bishoy Gendi • boring • Christmas • Daniel Boyle • design collectivedrawingsE4eclectic mixidentillustrative styleillustratorsJonathan Harrismaking things move • Matt Layzell • Michael Gendi • music video • psychedelic reindeer • reindeersnowsurprisetransformation • Treat (design collective) • TV ident

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 MARCH 2009

BBC Radio Scotland: pioneering digital moving graphics

"A series of three tv commercials made to promote the spoken word on radio. Each spot focuses on a sound recording from on–location reporters that unfolds over thirty seconds. We chose the final three recordings from dozens, supplied by the radio station, before setting out to visualize the stories"

(tomato, 1995, UK)

Fig.1 Motion graphic spot directed by UK design collective 'Tomato'.

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1995adadvertanimationBBC • BBC Radio Scotland • cinema veritedesign agencydesign collectiveinfluential worksmotion designmotion graphicsmotion typography • moving graphics • radioScotlandshowreelspoken wordTomato (design agency)TVCtypeUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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