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Which clippings match 'London' keyword pg.1 of 16
02 SEPTEMBER 2016

Intelligence (articulated by individuals) is produced by communities

Brian Eno speaking at 'Basic Income: How do we get there?' Basic Income UK meet-up at St Clements Church Kings Square, London, 3 December 2015.

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2015 • basic income • Brian Eno • community intelligence • cooperative intelligence • creative behaviour • cultural scene • David Graeber • Frances Coppola • ideas articulated by individuals • intelligence • intelligence is articulated by individuals • intelligence is produced by communities • intelligence of a whole cultural scene • intuition of a whole cultural scene • Londonlone genius • meet-up • myth of the genius • scenius • socio-constructivismsocio-cultural interactionsociological perspective • we are all born unequa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2014

Sympathy for the Devil (One + One)

"This is one of those rare and unsettling examples of a rock film which has the all the immediacy of reportage from a distant war–zone. The terrain is Olympic Studios in London in June 1968, where the Rolling Stones, recovering from the critical mauling of At Their Satanic Majesty's Request, are at work on the tracks that would become Beggars' Banquet. The film–maker was Jean–Luc Godard, at the height of his reputation as Europe's most daring director. Godard had briefly left Paris for London in the wake of the Paris riots of May '68 with the aim of making a film about art, power and revolution. The Stones, at their most dazzling and Luciferian, were, as Godard saw it, perfect for the role of agents of anarchy in a movie whose stated aim was to 'subvert, ruin and destroy all civilised values'. ...

As the track is worked and reworked, we glimpse the inner dynamics of the Stones. Bill Wyman and Brian Jones are on the margins (Jones spends most of the film shuttered away, ostracised, playing an inaudible and irrelevant acoustic guitar). Charlie Watts is every inch the dapper jazz mod, as spare with his incisive drumming as he is meticulous with his clothes. Jagger is languid, bored and then sexually ambiguous and cruel, coming only properly to life when he sings the lyrics. Most compelling of all is Keith, changing rhythms and cues at will, eyes gleaming, restless and fiercely intelligent, a million miles from the stoned zombie of legend. When he choreographs and leads the band and acolytes (including the witchy Anita Pallenberg) into the 'whoo, whoos' that make the track so malicious, it is sinister and stunning."

(Andrew Hussey, 21 May 2006, The Guardian)

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1960s1968 • agents of anarchy • Anita Pallenberg • Beggars Banquet (1968) • Bill Wyman • Black Panthers • bloodied corpse • bluesy grind • bookseller • Brian Jones • car park • Charlie Watts • Dave Mason • first-person narrative • jazz mod • Jean-Luc Godard • Jimmy Miller • JLG • Keith Richards • languid • left-wing idealsleftwing activistLondon • Lucifer • Maoist hippies • Mein Kampf • Mick Jagger • music documentarymusic recording • music studio • Nicky Hopkins • Olympic Studios London • One Plus One Sympathy for the Devil (1968) • Paris May 1968 • radical chic • recording artistsrecording sessionrecording studioreportage • Ric Grech • rock music • rockumentary • Rocky Dijon • samba • sexually ambiguous • sixtiessixties cool • studio scene • The GuardianThe Rolling Stones • urban guerrilla • Watts Street Gospel Choir

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2014

Shocking augmented reality experience greets London commuters

"Pepsi Max has gone straight to the top of this week's Viral Video Chart with its 'unbelievable bus shelter' which hoodwinked Londoners into thinking they were witnessing everything from an alien invasion to a loose tiger running in their direction.

The drinks brand rigged up a bus stop in the middle of central London with convincing digital technology which gave commuters the allusion that they were looking through a pane of glass to the world outside, when really they were seeing a digital display. A variety of awesome effects were then played onto the display to give the unsuspecting victims a fright."

(Staff Writer, 27 March 2014, The Drum)

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2014advertisingadvertising campaignadvertising conceptsadvertising in public spacesalien invasionaugmented realityaugmented reality experiencebody language • bus shelter • bus shelterscommuterdigital screensexperience creationexperience design • fright • frighteningLondon • New Oxford Street • nonverbal communication • outlandishPepsi • Pepsi Max • reactions • show (spectacle)stuntsurprisetiger • unbelievable • unbelievable scenarios • viral video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

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1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2014

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs at Tate Modern

Tate Modern: Exhibition, 17 April–7 September 2014

"Henri Matisse is a giant of modern art. This landmark show explores the final chapter in his career in which he began 'carving into colour' and his series of spectacular cut–outs was born. ...

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut–outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. ...

For the first time ever, we are broadcasting live into cinemas around the country with an exclusive film about the exhibition. Matisse Live offers an intimate, behind–the–scenes view of the artist via beautiful footage of the works, interviews with his friends plus rare archive footage of Matisse at work."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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