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Which clippings match 'Influential Women' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 SEPTEMBER 2013

Retrospective exhibition of surrealist artist Meret Oppenheim

"Die Meret Oppenheim Retrospektive im Bank Austria Kunstforum zeigt Arbeiten aus allen Schaffensperioden Meret Oppenheims. Eine umfassende Schau, die Gelegenheit bietet, Meret Oppenheim abseits bekannter Klischees neu zu entdecken."

(Joseph Schimmer, 20.03.2013)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2008

Motion typography: Universal Declaration of Human Rights

"the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was first outlined by the United Nations General Assembly at the Palais de Chaillot of Paris in 1948. Upholding the fundamental covenants of humanity, dignity and equality – in short, standards of living far too often taken for granted despite the ongoing and appallingly widespread human rights abuses evident worldwide – it was ratified by individual nations in 1976 and has since been upheld as a Bill of international law. With yesterday, the 10th December, marking its anniversary in the celebration of Human Rights Day, the video above is a subtle yet beautifully concise presentation of the thirty Articles contained within the Declaration. Created by artist and shoe designer Seth Brau, produced by Amy Poncher and featuring music by the LA–based Rumspringa (courtesy of Cantora Records, home of MGMT), it is as much of a fantastic exercise in motion typography as it is a worthy reminder of the importance and value of human life."
(Sarah Badr, pieces–at–random.com)

[An ad campaign by the Human Rights Action Center for Burma's National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The ad draws on the sentiment expressed in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.]

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TAGS

1948adadvertising • Aung San Suu Kyi • autonomyBurmacampaigncitizenshipculturedesign formalismethicsgovernancehuman rightsinfluential womenlawmotion graphicsmotion typographyMyanmarparticipationresponsibilitysocial changesocietyUnited Nations • Universal Declaration of Human Rights • women in politics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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