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Which clippings match 'Logic' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 JUNE 2011

Ayn Rand: objective reality

"In this engaging 1959 interview, her first on television, Ayn Rand capsulizes her philosophy for CBS's Mike Wallace. The discussion ranges from the nature of morality to the economic and historical distortions disseminated about the 'robber barons.' She also comments on her relationship with Frank O'Connor, provides some autobiographical information and gives her perspective on the future of America."

(Uploaded by hastelculo on 8 Jan 2008)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2011

Performativity involves a system logic that reduces questions of justice to questions of efficiency and has no interest in the unknown

"For Lyotard, performativity involves a system logic that reduces questions of justice to questions of efficiency and has no interest in the unknown because it falls outside the system as currently constituted. Against this he 'sketches the outline of a politics that would respect both the desire for justice and the desire for the unknown' (1984: 67). This involves turning away from performativity and towards the other possible legitimating criteria, consensus and paralogy. Lyotard argues that consensus, the criteria preferred by Habermas, is inadequate (1984: 60). It rests on a belief that it is possible to find a metalanguage that could translate all of the 'heteromorphous classes of utterance' into one another, and the assumption that it is possible for all speakers in scientific games to agree about this meta–language and that consensus is the goal of science (1984: 65). Against this, Lyotard argues that 'consensus is only a particular state of discussion, not its end. Its end, on the contrary is paralogy' (1984: 65–6)."

(Campbell Jones, p.512)

Campbell Jones (2003). "Theory after the Postmodern Condition." Organization 10(3): 503–525.

Jean–François Lyotard (1984). The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Fig.1 China's Pang Qing and Tong Jian perform in the pairs short programme during the Cup of China figure skating competition in Beijing November 5. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

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TAGS

consensus • criteria • discussionefficiency • heteromorphous classes of utterance • Jean-Francois LyotardJurgen Habermaslegitimating criterialegitimationlogic • meta-language • metalanguage • metanarrativeparalogyperformativityPostmodern • scientific games • scientific goalsstateThe Postmodern Conditionunknown

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical

"Before interdisciplinarity in either the disciplinary producing or disciplinary–circumscribing senses could manifest itself, disciplinarity itself had to take on its peculiarly modern form. Any assessment of interdisciplinarity – multi – and trans–, noncritical and critical– will benefit from an appreciation of this background.

Prior to the modern period, learning exhibited a kind of unity that might be called predisciplinary. Aristotle, it is true, introduced distinctions between logic, physics, and ethics, but these were never of a kind to raise the possibility of cross–disciplinary formations such as 'physical ethics.' During the Middle Ages, the division of the artes liberales into grammar, rhetoric, dialectic (the trivium), arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music (the quadrivium) ensured that the education of 'free men' included all the knowledge and skills needed to exercise their social roles. Insofar as it existed, disciplinary specialization was present more in the 'servile arts' of artisans and tradesmen. Not even teachers of the liberal arts became specialists in their different branches, because the idea of, for example, possessing arithmetic without grammar would have been considered a deformation of the mind. In the monastery schools, the unfettered pursuit of knowledge was viewed skeptically, criticized as curiositas, and therefore subject to disciplinization in a premodern behavioral sense. Only at the end of the Middle Ages, as the infinite pursuit of disciplinary knowledge took on the character of a spiritual activity, would Renaissance men become necessary to cross boundaries and synthesize diverse areas of learning."

(Robert Frodeman and Carl Mitcham, 2007, p.508)

[1][2] Frodeman, R. and C. Mitcham (2007). "New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical." Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society 27(6).

TAGS

Aristotlearithmetic • artes liberales • artisanastronomy • cross boundaries • cross-disciplinary • curiositas • dialecticdisciplinary knowledgedisciplinary specialisationdisciplinesdiscursive fielddivisionethicsEuropean Renaissance • free men • geometrygrammarinterdisciplinarityknowledgeknowledge integrationlearningliberal artslogicmiddle agesModern • modern period • monastery schools • multidisciplinaritymusicorderingphysics • predisciplinary • premodernpursuit of knowledgeQuadriviumrhetoricservile artsskillsocial construction of knowledgesocial rolesspecialisation • spiritual activity • synthesis • tradesmen • transdisciplinarityTrivium • unity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2010

The Logic of Deductive and Inductive Reasoning Methods

"In logic, we often refer to the two broad methods of reasoning as the deductive and inductive approaches.

Deductive reasoning works from the more general to the more specific. Sometimes this is informally called a 'top–down' approach. We might begin with thinking up a theory about our topic of interest. We then narrow that down into more specific hypotheses that we can test. We narrow down even further when we collect observations to address the hypotheses. This ultimately leads us to be able to test the hypotheses with specific data –– a confirmation (or not) of our original theories.

Inductive reasoning works the other way, moving from specific observations to broader generalizations and theories. Informally, we sometimes call this a 'bottom up' approach ... In inductive reasoning, we begin with specific observations and measures, begin to detect patterns and regularities, formulate some tentative hypotheses that we can explore, and finally end up developing some general conclusions or theories.

These two methods of reasoning have a very different 'feel' to them when you're conducting research. Inductive reasoning, by its very nature, is more open–ended and exploratory, especially at the beginning. Deductive reasoning is more narrow in nature and is concerned with testing or confirming hypotheses. Even though a particular study may look like it's purely deductive (e.g., an experiment designed to test the hypothesized effects of some treatment on some outcome), most social research involves both inductive and deductive reasoning processes at some time in the project. In fact, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that we could assemble the two graphs above into a single circular one that continually cycles from theories down to observations and back up again to theories. Even in the most constrained experiment, the researchers may observe patterns in the data that lead them to develop new theories."

(William M.K. Trochim, Last Revised: 10/20/2006, The Research Methods Knowledge Base)

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abstractionargumentbottom-upconceptualisationcreative practicedeductiondeductive reasoningdiscoveryenquiryexperimentation • generalisation • hypothesisinductioninductive reasoninglogic • logical reasoning • predicate logic • propositional logicreasoningresearch • sentential logic • theorytheory building • top-down • working theories

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2009

Disposition Toward Critical Thinking

"While [Critical Thinking] is being more and more widely recognized as a liberating force in education and a powerful resource in one's personal and civic life, the burgeoning national interest in developing students' CT has deep historic roots. The educational goal of teaching students to reason well and willingly can be traced back through the eighteenth century Enlightenment, the Renaissance, the medieval focus on logical argumentation, the North African and Roman preparation of jurists and lawyers, and the Aristotelian and Socratic concern for logic, rhetoric, and warranted assertibility.
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there is a growing consensus that a complete approach to developing college students into good critical thinkers must include the nurturing of the disposition toward CT. Some might argue that cultivating the disposition is necessary before implanting the skills, but a developmental perspective would suggest that skills and dispositions are mutually reinforced and, hence, should be explicitly taught and modeled together. In either case, common sense tells us that a strong overall disposition toward CT is integral to insuring the use of CT skills outside the narrow instructional setting. Motivational theory (Lewin, 1935) provides the theoretical grounds for the assumption that the disposition to value and utilize CT would impel an individual to achieve mastery over CT skills, being motivated to close the gap between what is valued and what is attained."
(Peter A. Facione, Carol A. Giancarlo, Noreen C. Facione, Joanne Gainen)

Facione, PA, Sánchez, (Giancarlo) CA, Facione, NC, & Gainen, J., (1995). Journal of General Education. Volume 44, Number 1, pp. 1–25. [This PDF made available with the permission of the publisher. See journal front–matter for information on copy costs.]

TAGS

Aristotle • civic life • conceptualisationcritical thinkingenquiryEuropean EnlightenmentEuropean Renaissance • liberating force • logic • logical argumentation • masterymotivational theorypedagogyrhetoric • Socrates • theory buildingthinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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