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22 OCTOBER 2013

Project Management and Business Analysis Guides

"The Project Service Centre (PSC) role within CSU is to establish sound Project Management (PM) principles throughout the organisation. This will provide a means of clearly identifying the true needs of the University and help facilitate those desired outcomes.

To achieve these objectives, the PSC must provide and enhance the methodology for project management and business analysis, including guides and templates. This particular section concentrates on a set of guides which recommends how different processes can be undertaken."

(Charles Sturt University)

TAGS

enefits analysis • brainstormingbusiness analysisbusiness analystbusiness communicationbusiness logicbusiness management • business process modelling • Charles Sturt University • conducting meetings • cost estimatedecision makingdocument analysis • echnical specification • elicitation practices • elicitation process • engineering process • financial analysis • focus group • functional decomposition • gathering requirements • interface analysis • interviewingmodelling and prototyping • needs analysis • PowerPoint lectureproblem-solvingproject managementprototypingquestionnaire • requirements analysis • requirements elicitationrequirements engineeringrequirements gatheringrequirements process • requirements workshop • reverse engineeringrole playingshared practicessoftware engineering • stakeholder interviews • surveysystem requirementsuse casesuser activity data • user observation • workshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2013

The Qualitative Research Interview

"While all interviews are used to get to know the interviewee better, the purpose of that knowing varies according to the research question and the disciplinary perspective of the researcher. Thus, some research is designed to test a priori hypotheses, often using a very structured interviewing format in which the stimulus (questions) and analyses are standardised, while other research seeks to explore meaning and perceptions to gain a better understanding and/or generate hypotheses. This latter research generally requires some form of qualitative interviewing which encourages the interviewee to share rich descriptions of phenomena while leaving the interpretation or analysis to the investigators. The purpose of the qualitative research interview is to contribute to a body of knowledge that is conceptual and theoretical and is based on the meanings that life experiences hold for the interviewees. In this article we review different qualitative interview formats with a focus on the face–to–face, in–depth qualitative research interview and conclude with a discussion of related technical and ethical issues."

(Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree, 2006)

Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree (2006). "The Qualitative Research Interview", Medical Education, Volume 40, Issue 4, pages 314–321, Wiley Online Library

TAGS

a priori hypotheses • Barbara DiCicco-Bloom • Benjamin Crabtree • body of knowledge • disciplinary perspective • ethical issues • explore meaning • explore perceptions • face-to-faceface-to-face interview • generate hypotheses • in-depth interview • interpretationinterview (research method)interviewinginterviews • investigators • life experiences • qualitative data • qualitative interview formats • qualitative interviewing • qualitative interviewsqualitative research • qualitative research interview • researchresearch interviewsresearch questionrich descriptions • standardised data • structured interviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2012

Qualitative Research Methods: interview questions

"Basic descriptive questions
Can you talk to me about your car accident? Tell me what happened on that evening?
Describe how you felt that evening?

Follow–up questions
You mentioned that 'planning time' is important to you. Can you tell me how you use planning time?

Experience/example questions
You mentioned that you loved going to London. Can you give me an example or two of what made you love London?
Talk about your impressions of London.

Simple clarification questions
You have used the term 'constructivist teacher' today. Can you clarify that for me? What exactly can you talk about regarding your constructivist teaching?

Structural/paradigmatic questions
You state that this class was a problematic one. What would you describe as the cause of these problems?
Of all the things you have told me about being a critical care nurse, what is the underlying premise of your work day? In other words, what keeps you going everyday?

Comparison/contrast questions
You said there was a big difference between a great principal and an ordinary principal. What are some of these differences? Can you describe a few for me?"

(Hora Tjitra, Slide 12)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2011

Participant Observation as a Data Collection Method

"Participant observation, for many years, has been a hallmark of both anthropological and sociological studies. In recent years, the field of education has seen an increase in the number of qualitative studies that include participant observation as a way to collect information. Qualitative methods of data collection, such as interviewing, observation, and document analysis, have been included under the umbrella term of 'ethnographic methods' in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to discuss observation, particularly participant observation, as a tool for collecting data in qualitative research studies. Aspects of observation discussed herein include various definitions of participant observation, some history of its use, the purposes for which such observation is used, the stances or roles of the observer, and additional information about when, what, and how to observe."

(Barbara B. Kawulich)

Barbara B. Kawulich (2005). Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research. Volume 6, No. 2, Art. 43 – May 2005.

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TAGS

academic journal • anthropological studies • anthropology • collecting data • data collectiondocument analysiseducation researchenquiryestablished research methodsethnographic methodsethnographyinterviewingobservationparticipant observationqualitative research methods • qualitative research studies • qualitative studies • research methods • role of the observer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

A methodological discussion of email interviewing

"This article summarizes findings from studies that employed electronic mail (e–mail) for conducting indepth interviewing. It discusses the benefits of, and the challenges associated with, using e–mail interviewing in qualitative research. The article concludes that while a mixed mode interviewing strategy should be considered when possible, e–mail interviewing can be in many cases a viable alternative to face–to–face and telephone interviewing. A list of recommendations for carrying out effective e–mail interviews is presented."

(Lokman I. Meho, 2006)

Meho, Lokman I. E–Mail Interviewing in Qualitative Research: A Methodological Discussion. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 2006, vol. 57, n. 10, pp. 1284–1295.

TAGS

2006data collectiondata gatheringdata gathering instrumentse-mail • e-mail interviewing • e-mail interviewselectronic mailemail interviewingemail interviewsface-to-face interviewinterview (research method)interviewing • Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology • Library and Information Science (LIS) • LIS • mixed mode interviewing • online asynchronous interviews • online synchronous interviews • qualitative research • qualitative research method • research methodsocial and cultural phenomena • telephone interview • telephone interviewing • unstructured interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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