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Which clippings match 'Camera Angle' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 AUGUST 2013

Busby Berkeley: choreographing the epic visual spectacle

"Berkeley's choreography is important less for its movement of the dancers than for its movement of the camera. To overcome the limitations of sound stages, he ripped out walls and drilled through ceilings and dug trenches for his film crews. When a desired effect could not be accomplished with traditional film equipment, he had his budget expanded to include costs for developing custom rigs. His innovations explored ideas that the stationary camera could not. He wanted to take the audience through waterfalls and windows. He wanted lines of dancers to fall away to reveal scenery that in turn would fall away to expose an even larger setting. His dreams were big, but his determination to see them actualized was even bigger.

Even his worst attempts resulted in eminently watchable movies of exhilarating movement, but his best efforts produced startling effects that bordered on surrealistic dream states. In the quintessential Berkeley films Footlight Parade (1933) and 42nd Street (1933), cameras mounted on tracks are sent soaring past a multitude of dancing legs, flailing arms and orchestra instruments. In all, he directed more than twenty musicals, including an underwater sequence with aquatic star Esther Williams."

(Scott Smith, 6 February 2013, Keyframe)

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TAGS

42nd Street (1933) • aesthetic spectacleBusby Berkeleycamera angle • camera movement • camera rig • choreographic imaginationchoreographies for camerachoreographydance • dance productions • dancers • dancing legs • design formalismentertainment spectacle • Esther Williams • figures in space • flailing arms • Footlight Parade (1933) • geometryglamourgroupingkaleidoscopelegs • Lloyd Bacon • mirrored effectmovementmusical (genre)perspective viewscenerysound stage • stationary camera • surrealist stylesymmetry • underwater sequence • visual designvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacular • waterfa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2013

Lady in the Lake: the dramatic effect of subjective point of view

"Robert Montgomery drehte 'Lady in the Lake' 1947 nach einem Plot, das Raymond Chandlers gleichnamigen Roman adaptierte. In diesem Spielfilm verfolgen Beobachter die Handlung aus der Perspektive des Detektivs Philip Marlowe: Personen, die sich Marlowe zuwenden und mit ihm sprechen, wenden sich der Kamera zu. Das wirkt in Filmvorführungen im Kino, als wenden sie sich in den Projektionsraum und sprechen die Zuschauer an. Der Beobachter wird zugleich ins Bildgeschehen durch die szenische Konstellation hineingezogen (Immersion), wie auf die Grenze zwischen Filmraum und Projektionsraum verwiesen, da er im Filmraum nicht selbst handeln kann, sich aber wie Marlowe im Bildraum verortet. Marlowe bleibt ein anderer, meist unsichtbarer Körper, der aber sieht und den Anschluss des Beobachters an seine Wahrnehmung einfordert: Die Kamera verleiht ihren Beobachtern einen szenischen Kontext, in den Kinozuschauer sich versetzen können. Sie stossen dabei sowohl auf Vorgaben (wie Marlowe spricht) wie auf Fehlstellen (das Sichtbare von Marlowes Auftreten, wenn er nicht in einen Spiegel schaut)."

(Thomas Dreher, IASLonline)

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TAGS

1947 • Audrey Totter • black and whitecamera anglecinematic conventionscinematic language • cinematic space • crime fictiondetective storyfilm languagefilm noirfirst-person point of viewformal conceit • hardboiled • hardboiled detective • IASLonline • immersionLady in the Lake (1947)perspective view • Philip Marlowe • point of viewPOV • Raymond Chandler • Robert Montgomery • screen space • subjective shot • subjective viewpoint • visual conceit • visual depictionvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2012

Four to the Floor: the ever growing collection of Channel 4 idents

An "ever growing collection of Channel 4 current set of idents. The simple idea that flows through all these idents is the creation of 'the 4, be it optical illusion, supernatural intervention or coincidence, the iconic Channel 4 logo rears its head at some point during all these videos.

The basic premise leaves open many possibilities to play with, which perhaps also explains the longevity that these idents retain. New idents continue to be produced by Channel 4"

(John Beohm, idents.tv)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2011

Guardian rehires 'Skinhead' agency

"BMP [Boase Massimi Pollitt] was the Guardian's advertising agency in the mid–80s, when it created one of the most famous British adverts of all time for the newspaper.

The 1986 commercial featured a skinhead who appeared to be wrestling a man's briefcase from his hands. But the camera then cuts and viewers see that he is in fact trying to rescue the man from falling bricks.

'We had some inspirational pitches over the last few weeks but BMP's work really stood out,' said Marc Sands, Guardian Newspapers marketing director.

'Their intuitive understanding of our brands and the demands placed upon them was impressive. We look forward to some fantastic work springing from a genuine partnership.'

BMP will create advertising for the Guardian Unlimited websites as well as for the Guardian newspaper."

(Claire Cozens, 21 December 2000)

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TAGS

1980s1986advertisingadvertising agency • BMP (advertising agency) • Boase Massimi Pollitt • briefcase • Britishcamera anglefalsehood of images • Guardian Newspapers • Guardian Unlimitedperspectivepoint of viewskinheadThe GuardianThe Whole Picturetruth of perceptiontv adwhole is greater than the sum of the parts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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