Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Localisation' keyword pg.1 of 2
22 FEBRUARY 2014

An Introduction to the Federated Social Network

"To understand how federated social networking would be an improvement, we should understand how online social networking essentially works today. Right now, when you sign up for Facebook, you get a Facebook profile, which is a collection of data about you that lives on Facebook's servers. You can add words and pictures to your Facebook profile, and your Facebook profile can have a variety of relationships – it can be friends with other Facebook profiles, it can be a 'fan' of another Facebook page, or 'like' a web page containing a Facebook widget. Crucially, if you want to interact meaningfully with anyone else's Facebook profile or any application offered on the Facebook platform, you have to sign up with Facebook and conduct your online social networking on Facebook's servers, and according to Facebook's rules and preferences. (You can replace 'Facebook' with 'Orkut,' 'LinkedIn,' 'Twitter,' and essentially tell the same story.)

We've all watched the dark side of this arrangement unfold, building a sad catalog of the consequences of turning over data to a social networking company. The social networking company might cause you to overshare information that you don't want shared, or might disclose your information to advertisers or the government, harming your privacy. And conversely, the company may force you to undershare by deleting your profile, or censoring information that you want to see make it out into the world, ultimately curbing your freedom of expression online. And because the company may do this, governments might attempt to require them to do it, sometimes even without asking or informing the end–user.

How will federated social networks be different? The differences begin with the code behind online social networking. The computer code that gives you a Facebook profile is built in a closed way – it's proprietary and kept relatively secret by Facebook, so you have to go through Facebook to create, maintain, and interact with Facebook profiles or applications.

But federated social network developers are doing two things differently in order to build a new ecosystem. First, the leading federated social networking software is open–source: that means that anybody can download the source code, and use it to create and maintain social networking profiles for themselves and others. Second, the developers are simultaneously collaborating on a new common language, presumably seeking an environment where most or even all federated social networking profiles can talk to one another.

What will that likely mean in practice? To join a federated social network, you'll be able to choose from an array of 'profile providers,' just like you can choose an email provider. You will even be able to set up your own server and provide your social networking profile yourself. And in a federated social network, any profile can talk to another profile – even if it's on a different server.

Imagine the Web as an open sea. To use Facebook, you have to immigrate to Facebook Island and get a Facebook House, in a land with a single ruler. But the distributed social networks being developed now will allow you to choose from many islands, connected to one another by bridges, and you can even have the option of building your own island and your own bridges."

(Richard Esguerra, 21 March 21 2011, Electronic Frontier Foundation)

1

TAGS

2011abstraction layeragency of access and engagementautonomy • centralised infrastructure • centralised platformcommon interfaceComputer Supported Cooperative Work • content distribution networks • data contextdecentralisation • decentralised architecture • decentralised infrastructure • distributed ecosystemdistributed models • distributed social network • Distributed Social Networking (DOSN) • distributed social networks • distributed systemElectronic Frontier Foundation • Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) • Facebook • Federated Social Networks (FSN) • Google Wave Federation Protocol • hCard • information ecosysteminteroperabilityknowledge commonsLinkedInlocalisationmultiplatform • OAuth • Online Social Networks (OSN) • open architecture • open protocol • Open Stack • open standardsOpenID • OpenSocial • Orkut • OStatus • peer-to-peer exchange • Portable Contacts (open protocol) • social network aggregation services • software portability • structural abstraction • system scalability • technology integrationTwitter • user application data • user autonomy • Wave Federation Protocol • web feeds • web services • XFN • XRD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2012

Small business marketing: tweeting globally, accessed locally

"SAN FRANCISCO – Three weeks after Curtis Kimball opened his crème brûlée cart in San Francisco, he noticed a stranger among the friends in line for his desserts. How had the man discovered the cart? He had read about it on Twitter.

For Mr. Kimball, who conceded that he 'hadn't really understood the purpose of Twitter,' the beauty of digital word–of–mouth marketing was immediately clear. He signed up for an account and has more than 5,400 followers who wait for him to post the current location of his itinerant cart and list the flavors of the day, like lavender and orange creamsicle.

'I would love to say that I just had a really good idea and strategy, but Twitter has been pretty essential to my success,' he said. He has quit his day job as a carpenter to keep up with the demand.

Much has been made of how big companies like Dell, Starbucks and Comcast use Twitter to promote their products and answer customers' questions. But today, small businesses outnumber the big ones on the free microblogging service, and in many ways, Twitter is an even more useful tool for them."

(Claire Cain Miller, 22 July 2009, New York Times)

1

TAGS

ad budget • advertising and marketing • advertising strategy • being discovered • big companies • cart • Coca-Cola • Comcast • creme brulee cart • current location • Curtis Kimball • customers • Dell • desserts • digital word-of-mouth marketing • e-commerce business • fresh • itinerant cart • little-bitty store • little-bitty town • local businesslocal businesseslocalisationMcDonaldsmicroblogging • mom-and-pop shops • multiplatform marketers • New York Times • promote products • San Franciscoshopping behavioursmall businesssmall businesses • small-business owners • social mediaStarbucks • supersmall businesses • sushi restaurant • tactical engagementTweetDeckTwitter • Twitter followers • Twitter localisation • Umi (restaurant) • word of mouth • word-of-mouth • word-of-mouth promotion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 SEPTEMBER 2012

Creative Industries KTN: Partnering For Innovation

"Creative Industries KTN will be hosting a half day event around challenge 3 of the funding competition which seeks projects that investigate the potential of Cross–Platform analytical metrics and feedback tools to help content producers better understand the consumption of their products in a converged landscape.

This session will provide an opportunity for potential applicants to learn more about the programme and how to apply to it."

(Creative Industries Knowledge Transfer Network)

1

TAGS

2012aggregator • analytical feedback • analytical metrics • audience research • business of being a resident • content origination tools • content producer • converged landscape • creative contentcreative economyCreative Industries Knowledge Transfer NetworkCreative Industries KTNcross-platform • data ecology • digital content • emergent ecology • feedback tools • funding competitionGPS • GPS technology • hyperlocal • hyperlocal media • hyperlocal media models • knowledge-based economylocalisationlocationLondonmedia audiencemedia consumptionmedia convergencemetrics toolsmobile applications • publication mechanisms • quantitative data • resident • textual content • UKuser behavioursuser interactionsworkshop

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2012

International Journal of Design: peer-reviewed and open-access

"The International Journal of Design is a peer–reviewed, open–access journal devoted to publishing research papers in all fields of design, including industrial design, visual communication design, interface design, animation and game design, architectural design, urban design, and other design related fields. It aims to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas and findings from researchers across different cultures and encourages research on the impact of cultural factors on design theory and practice. It also seeks to promote the transfer of knowledge between professionals in academia and industry by emphasizing research in which results are of interest or applicable to design practices."

(International Journal of Design)

1

TAGS

affective design • animation • approaches to design • architectural design • computer applications in design • cultural factors on design • design fieldsdesign industrydesign journaldesign management • design methodologies • design practicedesign practicesdesign professionalsdesign researchdesign research journal • design strategy and management • design theoryemotional designergonomic design • ergonomics and perceptions in design • game designglobalisationglobalisation and localisationhuman perception • IJDesign • impact of cultural factors on design theory and practice • industrial designinterface designInternational Journal of Design • journal of design • journal of design research • kansei • kansei engineering • localisation • open-access journal • peer-reviewed journalresearch papers • social-cultural aspects of design • theory and practiceurban designvisual communicationvisual communication design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2009

ICANN Bringing the Languages of the World to the Global Internet

"Seoul: The first Internet addresses containing non–Latin characters from start to finish will soon be online thanks to today's approval of the new Internationalized Domain Name Fast Track Process by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers board.

'The coming introduction of non–Latin characters represents the biggest technical change to the Internet since it was created four decades ago,' said ICANN chairman Peter Dengate Thrush. 'Right now Internet address endings are limited to Latin characters–A to Z. But the Fast Track Process is the first step in bringing the 100,000 characters of the languages of the world online for domain names.'

ICANN's Fast Track Process launches on 16 November 2009. It will allow nations and territories to apply for Internet extensions reflecting their name–and made up of characters from their national language. If the applications meet criteria that includes government and community support and a stability evaluation, the applicants will be approved to start accepting registrations.

' This is only the first step, but it is an incredibly big one and an historic move toward the internationalization of the Internet ,' said Rod Beckstrom, ICANN's President and CEO. 'The first countries that participate will not only be providing valuable information of the operation of IDNs in the domain name system, they are also going to help to bring the first of billions more people online–people who never use Roman characters in their daily lives.'

IDNs have been a topic of discussion since before ICANN's inception. It's taken years of intense technical testing, policy development, and global co–operation to prepare the Fast Track process for its coming launch.

'Our work on IDNs has gone through numerous drafts, dozens of tests, and an incredible amount of development by volunteers since we started this project. Today is the first step in moving from planning and implementation to the real launch,' said Tina Dam, ICANN's Senior Director for IDNs. 'The launch of the Fast Track Process will be an amazing change to make the Internet an even more valuable tool, and for even more people around the globe.'"

(Internet Corporation For Assigned Names and Numbers, 30 October 2009)

[Another step towards localisation – further reducing the expectation of universal top–level domain names.]

TAGS

2009accessibilitydomain nameengagement • Fast Track Process • ICANN • ICTIDNinformation in contextInternet • Internet Corporation For Assigned Names and Numbers • Korealanguagelocallocalisation • non-Latin • Peter Dengate Thrush • Rod Beckstrom • SeoulSouth Koreatechnology • Tina Dam • top-leve

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.