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19 JULY 2014

Using OneNote for gathering design project requirements

"Having a laptop open in a research interview puts a barrier between you and the person you're interviewing, and the typing can be quite distracting and intimidating for the interviewee. But typed notes are searchable, making for very useful reference when you're synthesizing your notes. OneNote is a nice compromise. With a Tablet in slate mode, we remove the physical barrier of the laptop, and as long as you have the pen in a 'Create Handwriting' mode, you can later go back and search your notes as if they were typed. (The handwriting recognition is pretty amazing.)

We sometimes have interviews by phone, and in these cases we often type notes. OneNote can go back and forth pretty seamlessly between handwriting and text, so it keeps all notes in one place. Also I find the quick–keys for adding tags to notes to be very useful when typing. You can tag questions you have, comments for follow–up, and ideas you generate, all with the quick stroke of a key.

For really important meetings, we can also use the audio recording features, which gives the ability to later go back and click on a piece of handwriting to hear what was being said at the time. Unfortunately you have to be using an external microphone for this, or all you hear is the tap–tap–tapping of the stylus hitting the slate surface instead of insightful interview conversation.

And I should note that research is not where OneNote shines the most. There are a few competing tools, like the LiveScribe Echo SmartPen and even pen and paper and that are giving it a run for its money. But as long as we're outfitting our designers with the Tablet, OneNote is a fine tool to use during research."

(Chris Noessel, 7 March 2013, Cooper Journal)

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TAGS

audio recording • client interview • client liaisoncontent integration • content integration tool • design businessdesign objectivesdesign plandesign projectgeneral grounding document • handwriting • handwriting recognition • interaction design • Livescribe Echo Smartpen • managing design • Microsoft OneNote • multimedia toolnotebooknotesnotetakingpen and paperpersonas (UCD) • project reference • project requirements • requirements capture • requirements elicitationrequirements gatheringresearch interviewscope of practicesearchable content • slate mode • synthesising information • Tablet PCtext recognition • typed notes • user storiesvideo documentationworkflow toolworking practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2011

Search The British Newspaper Archive online

"The British Library and online publisher brightsolid today launch a website that will transform the way that people use historical newspapers to find out about the past. The British Newspaper Archive website will offer access to up to 4 million fully searchable pages, featuring more than 200 newspaper titles from every part of the UK and Ireland. The newspapers – which mainly date from the 19th century, but which include runs dating back to the first half of the 18th century – cover every aspect of local, regional and national news."

(The British Library and brightsolid, 29/11/2011)

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TAGS

1851 • 18th century19th century2011advertisementancestorsannouncements • brightsolid • British Library • British Newspaper Archive • classifieds • crime and punishment • Crystal Palace • cultural heritagedigital heritagedigital resourcesdigitisationenterprise and creativityeveryday lifefamilyfamily historyfashiongenealogy • historic events • historical detail • historical newspapers • historyillustrationsIreland • letters to the editor • lives of ordinary people • local news • microfilm • milestone events • national cultural heritage online • national news • newspaper • newspaper collection • notable individualsobituaryonline accesspay-per-viewpreservation • published record • regional news • resourcesearchsearch toolsearchable content • searchable online • shared memory • social transformationThe Great Exhibition (1851)UKVictorian

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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