Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Funny' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 NOVEMBER 2012

The Gashlycrumb Tinies: 26 varieties of misadventure

"The deaths in Edward Gorey's picture book, The Gashlycrumb Tinies, are funny in all these ways: 'G is for George smothered under a rug, H is for Hector done in by a thug ... M is for Maud who was swept out to sea, N is for Neville who died of ennui, O is for Olive run through with an awl, P is for Prue trampled flat in a brawl ... R is for Rhoda consumed by a fire...'

The Gashlycrumb Tinies is many things. It's a rhyming alphabet of 26 boys' and girls' names. It's a Dance of Death, detailing 26 varieties of misadventure. It's in a tradition of cruel comic verse: Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter, Belloc's Cautionary Tales, Graham's Ruthless Rhymes. It's a homage to the Victorian cult of childhood innocence and child mortality (eg Little Nell)."

(Tom Lubbock, 08 August 2008, The Independent)

Edward Gorey (1963). "The Gashlycrumb Tinies": or, "After the Outing".

1

2

TAGS

1963 • 26 • After the Outing • alphabetalphabet book • awl • bearblack humourboys • brawl • cartoon • Cautionary Tales (book) • child mortalitychildhood innocencechildrens bookchildrens book illustration • cruel comic verse • cult of childhood innocence • dance of death • dark comedydeath • deaths • Der Struwwelpeter (book) • Edward Gorey • ennui • firefunnygirlsgrizzly bear • Harry Graham • Heinrich Hoffmann • Hilaire Belloc • humourillustrationillustrative style • Little Nell • meet their ends • misadventure • names • nasty mishapspicture book • rhyming alphabet • rug • Ruthless Rhymes (book) • smothered • stupid deaths • The Gashlycrumb Tinies • thug • trampled • Victorianyoung child

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2011

Buster Keaton: one of the greatest comic actors of all time

"Buster Keaton is considered one of the greatest comic actors of all time. His influence on physical comedy is rivaled only by Charlie Chaplin. Like many of the great actors of the silent era, Keaton's work was cast into near obscurity for many years. Only toward the end of his life was there a renewed interest in his films. An acrobatically skillful and psychologically insightful actor, Keaton made dozens of short films and fourteen major silent features, attesting to one of the most talented and innovative artists of his time. ...

Often at odds with the physical world, his ability to naively adapt brought a melancholy sweetness to the films. The subtlety of the work, however, left Keaton behind the more popular Chaplin and Lloyd. By the 1930s, the studio felt it was in their best interest to take control of his films. No longer writing or directing, Keaton continued to work at a grueling pace. Not understanding the complexity of his genius, they wrote for him simple characters that only took advantage of the most basic of his skills. For Keaton, as for many of the silent movie stars, the final straw was the advent of the talkies."

(American Masters and The Public Broadcasting Corporation)

1
2
3

TAGS

actor • actor-director • American MastersBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedy • comic actor • daredevildeadpan expressionfilmmakerfunnyhumour • Joseph Frank Keaton • moviespathosPBSperformancephysical comedysilent filmsilent moviesslapstickstoicsubtlety • The Cameraman (film) • The General (film) • The Navigator (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.