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13 OCTOBER 2017

Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

"Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy conducts an in-depth investigation into the long and complex evolution of style in the study of rhetoric and writing. The theories, research methods, and pedagogies covered here offer a conception of style as more than decoration or correctness—views that are still prevalent in many college settings as well as in public discourse. The book begins by tracing origins of style in sophistic-era Greece, moving from there to alternative and non-Western rhetorical traditions, showing style as always inventive and even at times subversive. Although devalued in subsequent periods, including the twentieth century, contemporary views now urge for renewed attention to the scholarly and pedagogical possibilities of style as experimentation and risk, rather than as safety and conformity. These contemporary views include work in areas of rhetoric and composition, such as basic writing, language difference, digital and multimodal discourse, feminist rhetorics, and rhetorical grammar. Later chapters in this book also explore a variety of disciplines and research methods—sociolinguistics and dialectology, literary and rhetorical stylistics, discourse and conversation analysis, and World Englishes. Finally, teachers and students will appreciate a final chapter that explains practical teaching methods, provides ideas for assignments and activities, and surveys textbooks that promote a rhetorical stance toward style."

(Brian Ray, 2015)

Ray, B. (2015). Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy, Parlor Press.

TAGS

2015 • American stylistics • analysing style • basic writing • Brian Ray • Chris Holcomb • Classical rhetoric • composition analysis • content analysis • conversation analysis • cultural forms • dialectology • digital discourse • digital rhetoric • discourse analysis • discourse and conversation analysis • Elizabeth Closs Traugott • European stylistics • feminist rhetorics • Gayatri Spivak • genre analysis • H G Widdoseon • Jeanne Fahnestock • Jimmie Killingsworth • Judith Butler • language difference • language patterns • linguistic criticism • linguistics • literary and rhetorical stylistics • literature • Mary Louise Pratt • multimodal discourse • non-Western rhetorical traditions • Patricia Sullivan • patterns of language • Paul Butler • practical stylistics • public discourse • research methods • rhetoric analysis • rhetoric and writing • rhetorical analysis • rhetorical grammar • rhetorical stance • ritualisations of language • Roger Fowler • Ronald Carter • Sara Mill • social discourse • sociolinguistics • sociolinguists • sophistic-era Greece • stylistic analysis • stylistics • Susan Peck MacDonald • T R Johnson • Tara Lockhart • Terry Eagleton • thematic analysis • Tom Pace • Walter Nash • World Englishes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Public Domain Review: publicly available out-of-copyright works

"The Public Domain Review is a not–for–profit project dedicated to showcasing the most interesting and unusual out–of–copyright works available online.

All works eventually fall out of copyright–from classic works of art, music and literature, to abandoned drafts, tentative plans, and overlooked fragments. In doing so they enter the public domain, a vast commons of material that everyone is free to enjoy, share and build upon without restriction.

(Adam Green and Jonathan Gray)

Fig.1 [http://publicdomainreview.org/2011/08/15/labillardiere–and–his–relation/], Fig.2 [http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/07/30/the–flowers–personified–1847/]

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Adam Green • Biodiversity Heritage Library • Boston Public Library • British Library • California Digital Library • copyright • copyright free • copyrighted materialCornell University Library • Deutsche Fotothek • Europeana • Flickr: The Commons • Geographicus Rare and Antique Maps • Internet Archive • Jonathan Gray • Library of CongressliteratureLos Angeles County Museum of Art • Medical Heritage Library • National Archives (UK) • National Gallery of Denmark • National Library of Poland • National Library of the Netherlands • National Media Museum • New York Public Library • open content • Open Images • Open Knowledge Foundation • OpenGLAM • out-of-copyright • Prelinger Archives • Princeton Theological Seminary Library • public domain • Public Domain Review • Rijksmuseum • share and build upon • Smithsonian InstituteSmithsonian Libraries • SMU Central University Libraries • The Getty • The Royal Society (UK) • United States Naval Observatory • University of Houston Digital Libraries • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • University of Toronto Libraries • US National Library of Medicine • Villanova Digital Library • Walters Art Museum • Wikimedia Commons • works of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2013

New International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation

"International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation is an international publication that provides a forum for discussing the nature and potential of creativity and innovation in design from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Design creativity and innovation is truly an interdisciplinary academic research field that will interest and stimulate researchers of engineering design, industrial design, architecture, art, and similar areas. The journal aims to not only promote existing research disciplines but also pioneer a new one that lies in the intermediate area between the domains of systems engineering, information technology, computer science, social science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and related fields. The journal welcomes various kinds of research papers (analytical studies, constructive studies, case studies, field studies, literature surveys, etc.) that will establish the basis for the academic discipline of design creativity and innovation."

TAGS

2013academic journal • analogical reasoning • architectural designartificial intelligencecognitive scienceconcept generation • constructive studies • creativity and innovation • design creativity • design creativity and innovation • design educationdesign innovationdesign inspirationdesign researcher • design synthesis • design theoryengineering design • field studies • in-betweenindustrial designinformation technologyinnovative explorations • innovative process • interdisciplinary researchinternational journal • inventive process • inventive worklinguisticsliteraturephilosophypsychology • research field • research papersocial science • systems engineering • Taylor and Francis • theories on design • visual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2013

George Orwell: Politics and the English Language

"Dying metaphors. A newly invented metaphor assists thought by evoking a visual image, while on the other hand a metaphor which is technically 'dead' (e.g. iron resolution) has in effect reverted to being an ordinary word and can generally be used without loss of vividness. But in between these two classes there is a huge dump of worn–out metaphors which have lost all evocative power and are merely used because they save people the trouble of inventing phrases for themselves. Examples are: Ring the changes on, take up the cudgel for, toe the line, ride roughshod over, stand shoulder to shoulder with, play into the hands of, no axe to grind, grist to the mill, fishing in troubled waters, on the order of the day, Achilles' heel, swan song, hotbed. Many of these are used without knowledge of their meaning (what is a 'rift,' for instance?), and incompatible metaphors are frequently mixed, a sure sign that the writer is not interested in what he is saying. Some metaphors now current have been twisted out of their original meaning without those who use them even being aware of the fact. For example, toe the line is sometimes written as tow the line. Another example is the hammer and the anvil, now always used with the implication that the anvil gets the worst of it. In real life it is always the anvil that breaks the hammer, never the other way about: a writer who stopped to think what he was saying would avoid perverting the original phrase."

(George Orwell)

George Orwell (1950). "Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays", Secker & Warburg Publishers, UK.

TAGS

1946allusion • artful • clarity of thoughtcliche • colloquial lexicon • common metaphorscommunicationcomprehending language • connotation • dying metaphors • EnglishEnglish language • evocative power • expressionexpressive repertoirefigurative languagefigure of speechGeorge Orwellhackneyedidiomimaginative metaphorsindirect reference • inventing phrases • languagelanguage developmentlazinessliteraturemental imagemetaphor • mixed metaphor • ordinary word • poetic devices • poetic functionsentence • tired expressions • use of wordsverbal freshness • visual image • vividness • worn-out • writing • writing style • writing tips

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: illustrations replace text in newspapers

Montag (Oskar Werner) 'reads' his illustrated newspaper in bed. The scene is from François Truffaut's classic film treatment of Ray Bradbury's 1953 novel about a dystopian world where written books have been outlawed.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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