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Which clippings match 'UC Berkeley' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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TAGS

1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Australia: people flock online for free university education

"THE NUMBER of people enrolled in free online subjects at Melbourne University has overtaken enrolments at its campuses in less than two months.

The university became the first Australian institute to join online education provider Coursera in September.

Since then more than 52,000 students have enrolled in the university's free massive open online courses, which will begin next year."

(Benjamin Preiss, 3 November 2012, The Age)

TAGS

2012 • academic credit • AustraliaBerkeley (University of California) • certificate of completion • challenges and changesCoursera (provider)coursewaredegree qualification • extend learning out • formal degree • free online education • free online university courses • generate interest • Harvard Universityhigher educationiTunes U • La Trobe University • Margaret Sheil • market regulationmarketizationMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMassive Open Online CoursesmonitiseMOOCs • MyUniversity (site) • online courseonline education provideropen courseware • outlearning • outreach technology • paid online university courses • qualificationstechnology transforming learningUC Berkeleyuniversity degreeUniversity of Melbourne

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Writing an Abstract

"An abstract is a short summary of your completed research. If done well, it makes the reader want to learn more about your research.

These are the basic components of an abstract in any discipline:

1) Motivation/problem statement: Why do we care about the problem? What practical, scientific, theoretical or artistic gap is your research filling?

2) Methods/procedure/approach: What did you actually do to get your results? (e.g. analyzed 3 novels, completed a series of 5 oil paintings, interviewed 17 students)

3) Results/findings/product: As a result of completing the above procedure, what did you learn/invent/create?

4) Conclusion/implications: What are the larger implications of your findings, especially for the problem/gap identified in step 1?

However, it's important to note that the weight accorded to the different components can vary by discipline. For models, try to find abstracts of research that is similar to your research."

(UC Berkeley, 2004)

TAGS

abstract (academic writing) • academic writing • artistic gap • knowledge gap • practical gap • problem statement • researchresearch abstractresearch methodsresearch paper • scientific gap • theoretical contexttheoretical gapUC Berkeley

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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