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28 FEBRUARY 2016

Infinity Mirrored Room: The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away

"Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrored Room, a mirror-lined chamber housing a dazzling and seemingly endless LED light display, will be featured in the inaugural installation."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 AUGUST 2013

Busby Berkeley: choreographing the epic visual spectacle

"Berkeley's choreography is important less for its movement of the dancers than for its movement of the camera. To overcome the limitations of sound stages, he ripped out walls and drilled through ceilings and dug trenches for his film crews. When a desired effect could not be accomplished with traditional film equipment, he had his budget expanded to include costs for developing custom rigs. His innovations explored ideas that the stationary camera could not. He wanted to take the audience through waterfalls and windows. He wanted lines of dancers to fall away to reveal scenery that in turn would fall away to expose an even larger setting. His dreams were big, but his determination to see them actualized was even bigger.

Even his worst attempts resulted in eminently watchable movies of exhilarating movement, but his best efforts produced startling effects that bordered on surrealistic dream states. In the quintessential Berkeley films Footlight Parade (1933) and 42nd Street (1933), cameras mounted on tracks are sent soaring past a multitude of dancing legs, flailing arms and orchestra instruments. In all, he directed more than twenty musicals, including an underwater sequence with aquatic star Esther Williams."

(Scott Smith, 6 February 2013, Keyframe)

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TAGS

42nd Street (1933) • aesthetic spectacleBusby Berkeleycamera angle • camera movement • camera rig • choreographic imaginationchoreographies for camerachoreographydance • dance productions • dancers • dancing legs • design formalismentertainment spectacle • Esther Williams • figures in space • flailing arms • Footlight Parade (1933) • geometryglamourgroupingkaleidoscopelegs • Lloyd Bacon • mirrored effectmovementmusical (genre)perspective viewscenerysound stage • stationary camera • surrealist stylesymmetry • underwater sequence • visual designvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacular • waterfa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 JULY 2012

Visual simplicity targeting younger customers

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TAGS

2011aesthetics • Alexandre Plokhov • Alexandre Plokhov collection • autumn/winter collection • classic design • classic suit • cloakclothescontemporary design • cool tailoring • design formalismdesign simplicitydesign style • Douglas Keeve • elegancefashion designfashion design collectionfigures in spacehaute couturehigh fashionhomoeroticismkaleidoscope • men • menswear • menswear design • menswear designer • minimalmirrored effect • overcoat • staid suit • stand-out pieces • stylesuitsymmetrytableau vivanttailoringvideo designvisual designvisual dramavisual simplicitywool • wool overcoat • younger customer • younger customers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Anne Spalter: Traffic Circle

New York debut of Anne Morgan Spalter
@ Stephan Stoyano/LuxeGallery
November 29, 2011– January 6, 2012

"Stephan Stoyanov/Luxe Gallery is pleased to announce the inaugural New York City solo show of Anne Morgan Spalter, a new–media pioneer who initiated and taught the first fine arts new media courses at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 1990 and Brown University in 1992. Spalter's exhibition, Traffic Circle, is a milestone in her two–decade odyssey in integrating art and technology. Spalter draws on centuries of work in the landscape genre but brings a new perspective on the modern landscape.

With works created exclusively for this exhibition, Spalter introduces geometrically patterned video works generated from footage she shoots in traffic, from aerial perches, at airports, and on the highway. Several pieces feature iconic New York City landmarks such as Rockefeller Center. The rhythmically structured compositions isolate or abstract features and motion of the landscape, highlighting the passage of taxis down 5th Avenue, for example, and the soaring of planes on takeoff. Inspired by her mathematical background and interest in Islamic art, she uses a symmetrical kaleidoscopic framework to brings order to complexity.

Spalter's art has explored the concept of the 'modern landscape' since first shown publicly at the deCordova Museum in 1992. She draws on her travels and her digital photographic and video database to create still and moving pieces. Works are realized as prints, intimate screen–based works, and large–scale screen and projection works: her work was shown this past summer at Big Screen Plaza's 30–foot LCD screen in New York City as part of Leaders in Software Art (LISA) and at the RISD Museum of Art's Open Call Video Art Screening Program."

(Anne Morgan Spalter)

5). Exhibition Press Release.

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TAGS

2011 • 5th Avenue • aerialairportAnne Spalterartart and technologyartistBrown Universitycompositioncomputer artdesign formalismdigital artdigital photographyexhibitionfine artgeometric patterngeometry • highway • iconicIslamic • Islamic art • kaleidoscopelandscape • Luxe Gallery (New York) • mathematicsmirrored effect • modern landscape • motorwaynew mediaNew York City • new-media pioneer • North American artistpatternRhode Island School of Design • rhythmic • RISD • Rockefeller Center • screen-based works • solo exhibition • solo show • Stephan Stoyanov • symmetrical patternsymmetry • taxi • traffic • Traffic Circle • video art • video works • visual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2009

Papermation by Jen Stark

"Adding yet another string to Stark's bow are stop motion animations in which paper is further imbued with new significance. Often accompanied by light electronic soundtracks, the looped kaleidoscopic films draw viewers through benign wormholes of living color.

At an exhibition of Jen Stark's one does not so much view work as observe extraordinary behavior in a state of stasis. With surprisingly simple means the artist succeeds in extending our world by venturing a furtive, unspoiled dimension of sentient forms.

Referencing geometry, meteorology and drawing freely from her own inimitable individuality she refines her message with economical yet expounding titles. Often scientifically and biologically dependable they call to mind established truths in nature and fortify our impressions of them with a greater sense of purpose."

(Tom Hollingsworth, May 2008)

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TAGS

2008animationartcolourcolour paperdesignelectronic musicgeometryillustrative style • Jen Stark • kaleidoscopematerialspaperpaper animationpaper cut designpapercraft • Papermation • symmetryvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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