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Which clippings match 'View Of Nature' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Bioglyphs: Generating images in collaboration with nature's events

"Reconstructive postmodernism proposes an alternative to a mechanistic interpretation of the world. The mechanistic model, which assumes that the world consists of discrete objects, has led to a 'disenchanted' interpretation of nature. In contrast to this objectification, the reconstructive model interprets nature as being primarily constituted of interacting events.

Since the 1960s ecological artists have developed strategies of representing this reenchanted view of nature through its phenomena or events. A number of these artists have sought to use photography to represent this view. However when such works are presented in photographic form I argue that the use of a camera tends to objectify the event.

In order to avoid the objectifying tendency of photography a number of contemporary artists have developed photographic methods of image–making which dispense with the camera. Bioglyphs, the creative practice of this current research, have been linked to the work of this group because of a shared approach to the use of photographic materials. However, if we assess the role of icon and index within photography, we can see that this approach may not always be sympathetic to the project of these artists.

Three key outcomes are identified. The first is the clarification of the concepts icon and index as applied to photography. Photographic images are shown to be primarily iconic rather than indexical. The thesis argues that iconic images tend to objectify the world whereas indexical images tend to represent the world as being constituted by events. Iconic photographic images therefore contribute to a disenchanted view of the world.

The second is that this reassessment of icon and index highlights a clear distinction between bioglyphs and most of the other camera–less images with which they are associated. In contrast to the iconicity of camera–less photographs bioglyphs are shown to be radically indexical. The third outcome is to show that, methodologically and interpretationally, bioglyphs have more affiliation with other artworks that are primarily indexical. This realignment of bioglyphs with other indexical art proposes a new category of art practice. This new category of indexical art, which foregrounds nature's events, suggests a method of art practice that is more supportive of reconstructive postmodern ideas."

(Daro Montag, 2000)

Montag, D. "Bioglyphs: generating images in collaboration with nature's events". PhD, University of Hertfordshire, 2000.

TAGS

art practice • bioglyph • camera-less • camera-less images • contemporary artcreative practice • disenchanted • ecological artists • icon • icon and index • iconic photographic images • iconicity • image making • image-making • index • indexical • indexical art • indexical images • interacting events • interpretation of nature • mechanistic interpretations • mechanistic modelnature • objectification • objectify • objectify the event • objectifying tendency • objectifying tendency of photography • phenomena • photographic form • photographic images • photographic materials • photographic methods • photographyreconstructive model • reconstructive postmodernism • theoretical contextthesisUniversity of Hertfordshireview of nature

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2011

Jonathan Meades: Reading Stowe Gardens

"Stowe Park, a story filled with stories, is, says Meades, 'an anthology of boasts.' Take, for example, the temples of Ancient Virtues, British Worthies and Modern Virtues. Set in the Elysian Fields, reflected in the waters of the River Styx, they are Cobham's version of the good, the great and the downright bad: old heroes in the first, modern heroes in the second and everything that is rubbish about eighteenth century today signifed by the ruins of the third, and by a headless statue of none other than his arch enemy, Walpole. It is a big old Whig boast, and hilariously obvious. Obvious, that is, if you're a member of the Kit Cat Club , or someone with enough of a reading in the classics, in British history, in Cobhams Machiovelian shenanigons. Otherwise, like most of us, you'll be needing that there guide book."

(26 October 2011, FreeState)

Abroad Again: Season 1, Episode 5, Stowe: Reading a Garden (6 June 2007) [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1180365/].

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TAGS

18th century2007 • architectural folly • aristocracyboasting • classical ideals • classical virtues • decorationdesign formalism • enclosed world • English garden • English landscape garden • English landscape movement • English landscape park • Enlightenment landscapes • European Enlightenment • follies • formal design • gardengarden design • garden follies • garden ornaments • gardening style • ha-ha • ha-ha wall • historical era • historical recreationidealismidyl • idyllic pastoral landscape • James Gibbs • Jardin anglais • John Soane • John Vanbrugh • Jonathan Meades • landscape architect • landscape architecture • landscape garden • ornamental design • pastoral landscape • picturesque • picturesque architecture • planting • reading a garden • Reading A Garden (2007) • Robert Adam • Robert Payton • Stowe Gardens • Stowe House • Stowe School • sublimesymmetrical patterntelevision documentarytheme parkUKview of naturevisual symbolism • Whigs • William Kent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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