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27 FEBRUARY 2017

Writing a Literature Review Using Thematic Groupings

"In a [literature] review organized thematically, you group and discuss your sources in terms of the themes, theoretical concepts, and topics that either you decide are important to understanding your topic or that you have identified from reviewing the key studies on your topic. This structure is considered stronger than the chronological organization because you define the theories, constructs, categories, or themes that are important to your research. ... In these types of reviews, you explain why certain information is treated together, and your headings define your unique organization of the topic. The sequence of the concepts or themes should be from broad to specific."

(Sally Jensen, 09 September 2013)

TAGS

academic writing • categorisain according to theme • chronological organisation • discussion of the literature • dissertation topic • dissertation writing • essay topic • essay writinggrouped categoricallygrouped related worksliterature revieworganisation of knowledgeorganisation through groupingprevious researchresearch paperresearch topicthematic organisationthematically • thematically organised • theoretical concepts • theoretical topics • undergraduate research • writing a literature review

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2013

How to Cite Interviews

"Interviews are a useful means of obtaining information from individuals who have been directly involved with the topic or period one is researching. Such individuals are 'primary sources' who can provide data or perspectives which may not be available from other sources. Individual interviews are normally used to establish or support particular points in a paper; a series of structured interviews may also comprise an entire 'original research component' of a paper if they form a coherent body of new information on the research topic."

(University of Tampere, 22 January 2012)

TAGS

academic citation • book interviews • broadcast interviews • chat interviews • citation • citing electronic sources • citing interviews • citing print sources • coherent body of knowledge • data collectione-mail interviewselectronic media • electronic sources • Gerard Hopkins • individual interviewsindividual perspectives • instant messaging interviews • interview (research method)interviews • live broadcast interviews • magazine interviews • MLA • Modern Language Association • new information • original research • personal interviewsprimary sourcesprint media • published interviews • radio interviews • research paperresearch sourcesresearch topicstructured interviews • telephone interviews • television interviews • University of Tamperevideo interviews • webcast interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Syllabus for Information Aesthetics at UIC School of Art and Design

"This studio course investigates the database as cultural form (Manovich, 2001), in the context of data visualization, digital fabrication, and computational aesthetics. Traditionally viewed as a tool for scientific reasoning and data exploration, information visualization has emerged as an artistic practice, propelled by the democratization of data sources and the advancement of computer graphics. The massive amount of data collected and disseminated online constitutes the basis for this course. Participants will be introduced to the basic skills for developing creative projects in two–, three–, and four dimensions, such as indexes, graphs, prints, digitally fabricated objects and maps. Students will also become familiar with the a basic vocabulary to co–create and collaborate with professionals in future contexts.

The course focuses on current standards for web development and mobile applications, including HTML5, CSS3, jQuery, PHP, MySQL, and Processing(.js). Fundamentals in XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and programming are beneficial, but not required. Throughout the course, students are asked to utilize the class blog to collect and share resources, collaboratively collecting interesting data sources towards a final project. A series of presentations, screenings, readings, and discussions will expose students to creative projects and artworks in the context of information visualization. Each student selects a research topic followed by an in–class research presentation (see schedule). Participants will also present their work during class critiques and interdisciplinary workshops to receive qualitative feedback from the instructor(s) and the class."

(Daniel Sauter, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Art and Design, Fall 2011)

Fig.1 Matt Wizinsky (2011). "Chicago unDensity", University of Illinois at Chicago.

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TAGS

2011 • cascading style sheets • Chicago • Chicago unDensity • class blog • class critiques • collaboration • collaboratively collecting • College of Architecture and the Arts • communication design educationcomputational aestheticscomputer graphics • course curriculum • creative projectsCSSCSS3cultural formscurriculum designdata • data exploration • data visualisationdatabase as cultural form • democratisation of data sources • design studiodigital fabrication • digitally fabricated objects • HTML5 • Illinois • information aestheticsinformation graphicsinformation visualisationinteractive tool • interdisciplinary workshops • jQueryLev Manovichmapmobile applicationsMySQLPHPProcessing (software)programming • qualitative feedback • research topicSchool of Art and Designstudio coursestudio programmesyllabus • tools for scientific reasoning • UIC • University of Illinois • University of Illinois at Chicago • visual vocabularyvisualisationweb developmentXHTML

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2011

Writing a Literature Review

"A literature review is a survey and discussion of the literature in a given area of study. It is a concise overview of what has been studied, argued, and established about a topic, and it is usually organized chronologically or thematically. A literature review is written in essay format. It is not an annotated bibliography, because it groups related works together and discusses trends and developments rather than focusing on one item at a time. It is not a summary; rather, it evaluates previous and current research in regard to how relevant and/or useful it is and how it relates to your own research."

(Saint Mary's University)

TAGS

academic writingannotated bibliography • area of study • chronologically • concise overview • current research • discussion of the literature • essay format • evaluation • grouped related developments • grouped related worksliterature reviewprevious researchresearch paperresearch topic • Saint Marys University • survey of literature • thematicallytopictrends • your own research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2011

Academic Phrasebank: a general resource for academic writers

"The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological 'nuts and bolts' of writing organised under the headings to the left. It was designed primarily with international students whose first language is not English in mind. However, if you are a native speaker writer, you may still find parts of the material helpful.

The phrases can be used simply to assist you in thinking about your writing, or they can be used in your own work where this is appropriate. In most cases a certain amount of creativity will be necessary when you do this. It is also possible to transfer some of the words used in particular phrases to others. The phrases are content neutral and generic in nature; in using them, therefore, you are not stealing other people's ideas and this does not constitute plagiarism."

(John Morley, 3 November 2011)

TAGS

academic essay • Academic Phrasebank • academic writingassignment writingdissertationessay • essay structure • essay writingresearch dissertationresearch paperresearch topicresearchertopic • topic of interest • University of Manchesterwriting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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