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Which clippings match 'Essay Structure' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 OCTOBER 2015

Rhetorical functions in academic writing: Introducing

"The purpose of the introduction is to show your reader what you are doing in your writing. It is also helpful to explain why you are doing it and how you are doing it.

In many parts of your writing - but especially in introductions - you may need to provide background information and introduce new concepts or ideas and provide a description of how you are going to proceed in the rest of your writing.

In the following text, after giving some background information to justify the research, sentence 10 introduces the rest of the report:"

(Andy Gillett)

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academic essayacademic writing • Andy Gillett • assignment writingdissertation writingessay structureessay writingessay writing guidelineshigher education • introducing your work • research dissertationresearch paperUniversity of Hertfordshire • Using English for Academic Purposes • writing essay introductions • writing essays • writing guidelines • writing introductions (academic writing) • writing practice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2011

Academic Phrasebank: a general resource for academic writers

"The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological 'nuts and bolts' of writing organised under the headings to the left. It was designed primarily with international students whose first language is not English in mind. However, if you are a native speaker writer, you may still find parts of the material helpful.

The phrases can be used simply to assist you in thinking about your writing, or they can be used in your own work where this is appropriate. In most cases a certain amount of creativity will be necessary when you do this. It is also possible to transfer some of the words used in particular phrases to others. The phrases are content neutral and generic in nature; in using them, therefore, you are not stealing other people's ideas and this does not constitute plagiarism."

(John Morley, 3 November 2011)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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