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Which clippings match 'Soviet Russia' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 JUNE 2015

Compelling motion infographics: The Fallen of World War II

"The Fallen of World War II is an interactive documentary that examines the human cost of the second World War and the decline in battle deaths in the years since the war. The 15-minute data visualization uses cinematic storytelling techniques to provide viewers with a fresh and dramatic perspective of a pivotal moment in history."

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23 • 80 • Africa • AlteredQualiea • Andy Dollerson • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auschwitz-Birkenau • AustraliaAustriaaverage age • battle deaths • Belgium • Belzec • British colonial era • BurmaCanadacasualties • Chelmno • civilian deaths • concentration camp • cost of war • counting the numbers • course of historyD-Day landingdata visualisation • data-driven documentary • death campDenmark • Eastern Front • Estonia • firebombing • Francefutility of wargas chambergassingGreecehistorical perspective • human cost of war • HungaryIndiaIndonesiainfo graphicsinteractive information designItalyJapanJewish HolocaustKoreaLatviaLithuania • long peace • Luxembourg • Majdanek • military conflictMyanmarNazi Germany • Neil Halloran • Netherlands • North American historical perspective • Norwaynumerical scalesOkinawa • Omaha Beach • Pacific Rim • Pacific War • peace • Pearl Harbor • Peoples Republic of ChinaPeoples Republic of PolandPhilippinespicture statisticsPolandRomania • Siege of Leningrad • Slovakia • Sobibor • Soviet armySoviet Russia • Stalingrad • statistical graphics • Steven Pinker • Treblinka • UKvisual information designwarwar crimes • Western Front • World War II • Yellow River • Yugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2014

The Pervert's Guide to Ideology

"Starting from the provocative premise that political and commercial regimes regard us as 'subjects of pleasure', controlling us by offering us enjoyment, director Sophie Fiennes and charismatic philosopher Slavoj Žižek repeat the formula of their 2006 collaboration, The Pervert's Guide to Cinema.

The quirky, genial Žižek employs cleverly chosen clips from a huge variety of movies – including Brazil, M*A*S*H, The Sound of Music, and Brief Encounter – to illustrate his fascinating monologue, frequently appearing on sets and in costumes which replicate scenes from the films in question. For example, dressed as a chubbier, bearded Travis Bickle, he expounds the darker subtexts of Taxi Driver's plot from within the anti–hero's grotty apartment. This entertaining approach helps to ensure that what might otherwise have been a dense, even daunting intellectual challenge is actually an engaging and unexpected delight."

(The Institute of Contemporary Arts)

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2012 • A Brief Encounter (1945) • anxieties • atheism • bloodbath • Brazil (1985)capitalism • catholicism • cinematic fantasies • consumerism • critical interpretation • critique of ideology • cultural critic • cultural critique • cultural theorist • daisy-chained improvisations • desire • dissident • documentary filmenculturation • enjoyment • Ethel Sheperd • fatigues • fears • flights of fancy • hegemonic discourseheroiconographyideological messageideological systemsideologiesideology • If (1968) • impulse of capitalism • Jaws (1975) • Kinder Eggs • Lucy Von Lonkhuy • MASH (1970) • NaziNazi GermanyNazi propaganda filmsnews footageOccupy Wall Street • Ode to Joy • prevailing ideologies • promise of fulfillment • propagandapsychoanalysis • psychoanalyst • psychoanalytic critic • pursuit of enjoyment • Rammstein • readable experience • rebel • Seconds (1966) • secret message • simple pleasures • Slavoj Zizek • Slovene • Slovenian • Sophie Fiennes • Soviet Russiasubconscioussubtext • tacit understanding • Taxi Driver (1976) • The Dark Knight (2008) • The Fall of Berlin (1950) • The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) • the otherThe Perverts Guide to Ideology (2012) • The Searchers (1956) • The Sound of Music (1965)They Live (1988) • Titanic (1997) • Triumph of the Will (1935) • unconscious desires • underdog • unseen depths • villain • violent outsider • West Side Story (1961) • Zabriskie Point (1970)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2014

Sergey Merkurov: Soviet Erotic Alphabet (1931)

Reproduced here are a bunch of scans from a fascinating erotic alphabet book printed in the Soviet Union circa 1931, made to combat adult illiteracy. By the sculptor and future People's Artist of the USSR Sergei Merkurov, no less.

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1931alphabet book • alphabet picture book • artist book • artists books • cyrillic alphabet • cyrillic script • erotic alphabet • erotic art • erotic drawings • erotic sceneseroticismexplicit sexual imagerygenitalsgraphic designillustrated picture bookintimate sexualitylovemakingnaked figuresNSFWpenis • phallic art • physical lovepicture book • Russian alphabet • Sergei Merkurov • sex • sex positions • sexuality • Soviet Academy of Arts • Soviet Russia • soviet sex • Soviet Unionvagina • watercolor on paper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Kazimir Malevich: non-representational, non-painterly abstractions

"In the early twentieth century, Suprematism represented a leap into a totally non–representational, non–painterly, tarantella–like dynamic. Basic geometric shapes, isolated or in groups, were being energized, propelled into an optimistic ideal soaring from lower left to upper right, the vector alone suggesting time. The limits of perception and understanding are being questioned. An aura of simultaneous ecstatic concentration and idolatry of the will pervades these works.

Experienced 'in flesh,' these formidable abstractions look 'humanized': slight wavings in texture and color, the crackled paint of the Black Square on white, the subtlest of whites upon off–whites, transport the viewer into a higher, supremely charged, inspirational state of mind."

(Ileana Marcoulesco, Art Lies)

Fig.1 Kazimir Malevich (1915) "Black Circle", "Black Cross" and "Black Square"

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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