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Which clippings match 'Time Slowed Down' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JANUARY 2014

Observation at high speed: slit-scan photography of passengers waiting at Shinjuku, Alexanderplatz and 42 Street stations

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2014

Arrested moment allows contemplation for what might have been

"This campaign aims to reframe the way that people look at their speed when they're driving. A person may be a good driver but they can't deny that people do make mistakes–after all, to err is only human. And in life, mistakes are made often. We usually get to learn from our mistakes; but not when driving – the road is an exception. Even the smallest of mistakes on the road can cost us our life, or someone else's."

(NZ Transport Agency, 6 January 2014)

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TAGS

2014advertising campaignAotearoa New Zealandarresting timecar crashcareless drivingco-optioncollisionconsequencescountry roadcrashdangerous drivingdrivingemotive manipulationfait accompli • fatal crash • final momentfrozen in the moment • hard-hitting • human error • impending disaster • in media res • momentary reprieve • mortalityno escape • NZ Transport Agency • police enforcement • public information adpublic information advertisementpublic service announcementroad safety • serious injury • speed limit • speeding • stop moving and consider the consequencessuffering and inevitable deaththreshold spacetime manipulationtime slowed downtransport safetyTVC • what might have been

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

The Greeting is a film which pretends to be a painting

Bill "Viola's The Greeting is pretending to be a picture, hanging on the wall of the National Gallery, as part of 'The Passions' exhibition in 2003. The context of the gallery space and the badging of The Greeting as a picture give the work something different, making it more than just a film. The significance is in the context of where it is shown and the pretence occurring that this is a picture. Indeed, when walking downstairs in the National Gallery towards 'The Passions' exhibition, it is seeing it hanging on the wall that strikes immediately; I am being invited to believe that this animated film is pretending to be a picture. The analogy is of the picture becoming an actor, pretending to be something else. In terms of form, The Greeting is a film. Therefore, what is it that makes it now defined as an exhibition, a part of Viola's 'The Passions' in 2003? It is only the fact that it's part of a gallery that makes it an exhibition, although in reality it is also actors directed by a video artist into this film, slowed down and with no sound, which is pretending to be a painting. Therefore, it is conceptual art, in that what the artist is doing is not just making a painting, or having the idea for a painting, but having the idea of where it should be staged. The inscribed text of the space in which it is viewed makes a difference to what the viewer or spectator sees, and what is going on."

(Alison Oddey, 2007, p.70)

3). Alison Oddey (2007). "Re–Framing". In: "Re–Framing the Theatrical", Palgrave Macmillan. 1–21.

Fig.1 Bill Viola (1995). "The Greeting".
Fig.2 Jacopo Carucci da Pontormo "The Visitation".

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TAGS

2003actorsallusionart historyartistartistic experience • Bill Viola • conceptual artcontextexhibitionfigurationfilmgallery • gallery space • hanging on the wall • homage • inscribed text of the space • interdisciplinaryliving picturesmetatheatricalityNational Gallerypainting • Passions (exhibition) • performancepicturepretence • pretending • pretending to be a painting • re-framing • reenactmentreflexive foregroundingremediationspacespectatorspectatorship • staged • stagingtableau vivant • The Greeting • The Passions • the role of the spectator • the viewer • theatre-art • theatricaltime slowed downvideo artvideo artistviewer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

8 1/2 film intro shows protagonist in arrested moment

"Opening the film is a title card introducing the producer, the title of the film, and the film's director. That cuts to a tracking shot of a car in traffic, and then another cut to a shot from above the cars to show the congestion (this shot tracks them from right to left). At the end of that shot, there is a cut to the back of the main character, Guido's, head. The camera then moves to the left and shows the two people in the car sitting next to him. The camera comes back to Guido in his own car as he begins wiping the inside of his windshield. Smoke begins to fill the car. Guido plays with the buttons in the car and desperately tries to escape. There is another cut to a shot of people hanging out of a bus and people stuck in their cars. They seem to be frozen in time. The film then cuts to another shot, this time from outside the car, of Guido trying to get out. The camera pans to a man who is staring at Guido from another car. After we see Guido pounding at the window, the shot cuts to a man touching a woman's arm in another car. The camera then pans to more cars waiting in traffic and then finally comes back upon Guido's smoke–filled car. The shot then cuts to Guido finally making it out of the car through the window. He climbs atop the car. Then the shot cuts to another shot of a man in a different car watching him intently. The camera zooms out and we see the bus and then Guido somehow floating atop the cars, out of the traffic. The shot then cuts to his legs and tilts upwards to show his entire backside, his coat waving the wind, and him slowly raising his arms towards the sky. Then there is a cut (fade–in) to Guido flying through the sky, then another to just the clouds. As the camera glides through the clouds, it is ambiguous of whether there is another cut or if the camera just happens upon a structure of some sort. Then there is a solid cut to a man atop a horse that is galloping on a beach. We see a man in a white shirt tugging a rope. The shot then cuts to another shot of a leg with a rope wrapped around it, and we can see the man in the white shirt and the man on the horse on the ground in the background. The scene then cuts again to the man in the white shirt running around the beach tugging on the rope, and then again to the foot with the rope (which the man is trying to get off). The sequence then cuts again to the man who was on the horse holding papers, then to the body of the man whose foot was tied to the rope being tugged down and falling into the ocean."

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1963 • 8 1/2 • arresting momentsarresting time • beginning sequence • black and whitebuscarclaustrophobic spacesdream sequencedrivingfamous sceneFederico Fellinifrozen in the momentfrozen in timefrozen momentgassing • Gianni Di Venanzo • in media resinfluential works • intro sequence • introduction • introductory sequence • Italian cinema • Marcello Mastroianni • motorway • opening sequence • Otto e mezzo • threshold spacetime slowed downtraffic congestion • traffic jam • trapped

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2009

David Hellman: Braid

"Braid is a video game about solving puzzles in imaginative worlds. It's playful and philosophical. Its designer, Jonathan Blow, hired me [David Hellman] to create the graphics for his functional but visually spare rough draft. Happily for me, Jonathan asked me to bring my own sensibility and artistic guidance to the project. As Braid nears completion, I feel proud to have worked on a game with such an intimate and hand–crafted feel."

[Braid was created for Microsoft XBOX 360 in 2008]

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art directionBraidcharacter design • David Hellman • game • game artist • game mechanicgamesillustrationillustrative style • imaginative worlds • indie gamesportfoliopuzzlepuzzle platformerresumereverse timerewind timetime manipulationtime rewindtime slowed downtime-based game mechanicvideo gameXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

James Walsh
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