Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Light' keyword pg.1 of 4
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

TAGS

aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2014

How do we create things together in a shared environment?

"When critical thinking is at its strongest, it often comes from exactly the sort of fluidity of practice that does run through Digital Revolution. The London–based architect and artist Usman Haque has been creating innovative software products alongside interactive artworks for more than 15 years. In 2007, he founded Pachube, a global data–sharing network that anticipated by years the current buzz around big data and the internet of things. In 2011, Pachube enabled hundreds of Japanese civilians to quickly and easily share weather and radiation data in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, boosting monitoring and relief efforts. Haque's Umbrellium team has produced a new artwork for Digital Revolution, which takes up the entirety of The Pit, the Barbican's subterranean theatre space. Called Assemblance, the piece allows about 25 people at a time to physically shape beams of light with their hands, pushing and pulling them around the space–while also bumping into and potentially messing up the shapes created by other people.

Haque calls it 'a virtual reality', but not in the sense of a purely digital realm: 'It's there, it's responding to you, you can see it, but as you try and approach it you can't actually feel it. For me, the idea is to question this distinction between the physical and the virtual.' The process is akin to building a sandcastle on the beach, where you are building a structure that anyone else, or the elements, can destroy in a moment.

Assemblance attempts to answer the question: 'How do we create things together in a shared environment, where we can't always trust each other, but we need to act together regardless?' This, indeed, is the situation we find ourselves in now. In the modern digital world, the question of participation is crucial as our various networks–social, media, national–require us to constantly mediate between acting as individuals and acting as a group. For Haque, the digital has given us 'the capacity to have an effect on the other side of the world almost instantaneously', from news events and economic flows to disaster response and warfare. 'We can do things to other people in distant lands, and so the question of our responsibility, and our culpability, is thrown up in ways that it hasn't been before. On the other hand, we now have the capacity to connect with each other, and develop new ways to work together, rather than against each other.'

Assemblance asks the audience to see itself as part of a networked whole, where actions have consequences. It also points towards the fact that 'the digital' is not a medium, but a context, in which new social, political and artistic forms arise. After 50 years, at least, of digital practice, institutions are still trying to work out its relevance, and how to display and communicate it–a marker, perhaps, that it is indeed a form of art."

(James Bridle, 18 June 2014, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Assemblance, a 3D interactive light field by Usman Haque and Dot Samsen from Umbrellium. Photograph: Umbrellium.

1

TAGS

2014 • act together • acting as a group • actions have consequencesartwork • Assemblance (artwork) • Barbican Centre • beam of light • big data • capacity to connect • collaborative action • collective culpability • collective responsibility • creating things together • data sharing • data-sharing network • digital artdigital art exhibitiondigital art form • digital context • digital practicedigital revolutionDigital Revolution (2014) • Dot Samsen • economic flowsflowsFukushimaGoogle DevArtimmersive experienceimmersive worksindividual and collective activities • innovative software • interactive artworks • interactive light fieldinternet of thingslightlight artlight installationlight sculpturemediated interactionmediated reality • modern digital world • new ways of working together • Pachube • part of a networked whole • participationphysical and digital interactionPongresponsive light installation • sandcastle • shared environment • trustUmbrellium • Usman Haque

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Broad: contemporary art museum by Diller Scofidio + Renfro

"The Broad is a new contemporary art museum built by philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. The museum, which is designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, will open to the public in late 2014. The museum will be home to the nearly 2,000 works of art in The Broad Art Foundation and the Broads' personal collections, which are among the most prominent holdings of postwar and contemporary art worldwide. With its innovative 'vault–and–veil' concept, the 120,000–square–foot, $140–million building will feature two floors of gallery space to showcase The Broad's comprehensive collections and will be the headquarters of The Broad Art Foundation's worldwide lending library."

1
2

TAGS

2014architectural spacearchitectureart museumbox • Charles Renfro • collectionscontemporary artcontemporary art museumdesign proposalsDiller Scofidio + Renfro • display design • display of apparatus • display of process • Edythe Broad • Eli and Edythe Broad • Eli Broad • fine art collectionsgallery spaces • Grand Avenue LA • holdings • lending library • lightLiz DillerLos Angelesmuseumpersonal collectionsporous spacesproject pitchpurpose-builtRic Scofidiosculptural formshowcase • storage facility • The Broad (museum) • The Broad Art Foundation • transparency • vault • veiled • Walt Disney Concert Ha

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 FEBRUARY 2013

Claude Monet's Ultraviolet Eye

"Late in his life, Claude Monet developed cataracts. As his lenses degraded, they blocked parts of the visible spectrum, and the colors he perceived grew muddy. Monet's cataracts left him struggling to paint; he complained to friends that he felt as if he saw everything in a fog. After years of failed treatments, he agreed at age 82 to have the lens of his left eye completely removed. Light could now stream through the opening unimpeded. Monet could now see familiar colors again. And he could also see colors he had never seen before. Monet began to see--and to paint--in ultraviolet."

(Carl Zimmer, 16/04/2012)

1
2

TAGS

1915blindness • cataracts • Claude Monetcolourcolour and light • colour frequency • colour tones • declining vision • eye surgery • eyes • foggy • French painter • impressionism • impressionistic personal world • light • light frequency • light sensitivity • meticulous observation • muddier • nuclear cataracts • optical effectpainterperception of reality • perceptual abnormalities • pigment • ultraviolet color patterns • ultraviolet colour • ultraviolet light • ultraviolet sensitivity • ultraviolet vision • UV • visible light • visible spectrum • visionvisual distortionvisual perception • visual problems • wavelength

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Experimental typography: light refracted through water droplets

Ruslan Khasanov (2012) Lumen type: experimental typography.

1

TAGS

2012 • aberration • animation • bokeh • dappled light • design craftdustetherealeveryday lifeexperimental techniquesexperimental typeexperimental type designexperimental typographyexperimentationflicker in the light • glimmer • letterform exerciseslight • light refraction • liquid type • Lumen type • magnifying glass • mirror surface • nostalgic elegance • optical distortion • out-of-focus • Ruslan Khasanov • Russian designer • scratches • small drops of water • tiny letters • typetypographytypography experiments • visual properties • water • water droplet

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.