Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Programmable Media' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 JULY 2015

BBC Micro Bit: potential to inspire digital creativity?

"The BBC has unveiled the BBC micro:bit, a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass and Bluetooth technology, which is to be given free to every child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK. A collaboration between 29 partners, the micro:bit is the BBC's most ambitious education initiative in 30 years, with an ambition to inspire digital creativity and develop a new generation of tech pioneers. The UK currently faces a critical skills shortage in the technology sector and the BBC and partners aim to help change that. In the 1980s, the BBC Micro introduced many children to computing for the first time and the BBC micro:bit, part of the BBC's 2015 Make it Digital initiative, will build on the legacy of that project for the digital age. It aims to inspire young people to get creative with digital and develop core skills in science, technology and engineering. The micro:bit will also be made commercially available later in 2015, so those not in the year 7 group can get involved."

(BBC Make It Digital)

1
2
3

4

TAGS

11 and 12 year olds • 201521st century literaciesArduinoBBC Make It DigitalBBC Micro • BBC Micro Bit • BBC micro:bitcoding • coding programmes • computing kit • design and technologydigital creativity • digital device • digital skills • education initiative • engineering and design • FOTA (Firmware Over-The-Air) • home computing • imperial ambitions • inspire digital creativity • Intel Galileo • Micro Bit • over-the-air programming • pocket-sized circuit board • pocket-sized computer • printed circuit boardprogrammable deviceprogrammable mediaprogramming-oriented deviceRaspberry Piskills gapskills shortagetechnology education • Tony Hall • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2013

The Raspberry Pi

"The Raspberry Pi is a credit–card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It's a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word–processing and games. It also plays high–definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming."

1

TAGS

20062008 • Alan Mycroft • beginner-friendly • Computer Laboratory (Cambridge) • computer programming • CPU • design and technology • Eben Upton • hardware design • ICT literacy • Jack Lang • learn to codelearning software • mobile device processor • Pete Lomas • pocket-sized circuit boardprogrammable deviceprogrammable mediaprogramming environment • programming experimentation • programming-oriented deviceprototyping platformRaspberry Pi • Raspberry Pi Foundation • Rob Mullins • teaching tooltechnology educationUKUniversity of Cambridge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2013

All students should have the opportunity to be creative with code

This is a useful initiative, despite its narrow focus on engineering and science. It would be great to see the companion film which profiles creative arts and design professionals who regularly use programming as part of their practice/work.

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

"Wardrip–Fruin builds upon the foundation laid by Lev Manovich, who, in his 2002 book The Language of New Media, suggested that the natural development of media studies in an age of 'programmable media' should be 'software studies' (a set of approaches which includes 'expressive processing' but also code studies which, in Wardrip–Fruin's words, looks at 'the specific text of code' written by developers).

Expressive Processing fulfills and extends the promise of Manovich's ideas, putting the theory into practice through a set of case studies of the artificial intelligence engines of a dozen or so software programs that might be loosely called 'games.' That the first real example of a software studies approach comes out of game studies is both to be expected and (somewhat) regretted. On one hand, games of the sort Wardrip–Fruin examines are a medium for storytelling and character creation, and as such are natural extensions of the work of previous literary and media studies scholars and thereby set up a convenient space for humanities scholars and teachers to consider the important cultural and technical issues raised by Wardrip–Fruin in an environment more familiar than, for instance, an analysis of the software that drives Walmart (one of Wardrip–Fruin's suggestions for another work of software studies scholarship). Unfortunately, like graphic novels and musical theater, the genre is still too easily dismissed as popular entertainment by too many of those who most need to hear Wardrip–Fruin's arguments."

(Doug Reside, 2010)

Reside, D. (Fall 2010). "A review of Noah Wardrip–Fruin's Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies." Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).

1

TAGS

academic journal • ADHO • codecode studiescultural analyticsdatadigital culturedigital humanities • Digital Humanities Quarterly (academic journal) • expressive processing • game studiesgraphic novelhumanitiesinformation aestheticsLev Manovichliterary studiesmedia studiesmusical theatre • Noah Wardrip-Fruin • popular culture • popular entertainment • programmable mediasoftwaresoftware literacysoftware studiesstorytellingtext of codeThe Language of New Mediavisualisation • Walmart

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.