Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Musical Theatre' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 AUGUST 2014

Patience, Satire, and Self-Righteousness

"Gilbert and Sullivan's fifth Savoy Opera, Patience (1881), is a shining example of the critical role of satire in popular culture, and a most important record of how many self–righteous upper middle class contemporaries viewed fringe schools of thought and pop culture during the dissipation of the Evangelical church. The operetta's premise is that Reginald Bunthorne and Archibald Grosvenor––characters reputedly based upon Oscar Wilde and Charles Swinburne respectively, although the actor who originally played Bunthorne drew on Whistler––are shams as bogus as the aesthetic movement that they embody."

(William R. Terpening, 1998, Victorian Web)

1

2

TAGS

1881 • 19th centuryAesthetic Movementaestheticismaesthetics • Algernon Swinburne • Archibald Grosvenor • Arthur Sullivan • Charles Swinburne • chauvinismcolour • comic opera • critical commentarycultural critiqueDante Rossettidecadence • decadentismo • dissipation • electric lighting • Evangelical church • fringe • Gilbert and Sullivan • Harold Bloom • James McNeill Whistler • male vanity • musical theatreopera • Opera Comique • operetta • Oscar WildePatience (1881) • pop culture • popular cultureProtestantism • Reginald Bunthorne • satire • Savoy Opera • Savoy Theatre • Savoyards • schools of thought • self-righteous • self-righteousness • theatrical production • upper middle class • vanityVictorian literature • William Gilbert

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2014

Energizing corporate culture through industrial musicals

1

TAGS

1950s1954aesthetic spectacleautomaker • awayday • boom time • business contextChevroletcollective values • company loyalty • corporate Americacorporate behaviourcorporate culturecorporate events • corporate image • corporate musical • economic boomenculturationenergizing corporate cultureentertainmentGeneral Motors • industrial musical • industrial propaganda • industrial show • industrial theatre • internal marketing • internal songbook • marketing practicesmusical theatreorganisational culturePrelinger Archivespromoting shared business contextpropagandasales and profitshow (spectacle) • song-and-dance • team day • team motivation • team-buildingtrade convention

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

"Wardrip–Fruin builds upon the foundation laid by Lev Manovich, who, in his 2002 book The Language of New Media, suggested that the natural development of media studies in an age of 'programmable media' should be 'software studies' (a set of approaches which includes 'expressive processing' but also code studies which, in Wardrip–Fruin's words, looks at 'the specific text of code' written by developers).

Expressive Processing fulfills and extends the promise of Manovich's ideas, putting the theory into practice through a set of case studies of the artificial intelligence engines of a dozen or so software programs that might be loosely called 'games.' That the first real example of a software studies approach comes out of game studies is both to be expected and (somewhat) regretted. On one hand, games of the sort Wardrip–Fruin examines are a medium for storytelling and character creation, and as such are natural extensions of the work of previous literary and media studies scholars and thereby set up a convenient space for humanities scholars and teachers to consider the important cultural and technical issues raised by Wardrip–Fruin in an environment more familiar than, for instance, an analysis of the software that drives Walmart (one of Wardrip–Fruin's suggestions for another work of software studies scholarship). Unfortunately, like graphic novels and musical theater, the genre is still too easily dismissed as popular entertainment by too many of those who most need to hear Wardrip–Fruin's arguments."

(Doug Reside, 2010)

Reside, D. (Fall 2010). "A review of Noah Wardrip–Fruin's Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies." Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).

1

TAGS

academic journal • ADHO • codecode studiescultural analyticsdatadigital culturedigital humanities • Digital Humanities Quarterly (academic journal) • expressive processing • game studiesgraphic novelhumanitiesinformation aestheticsLev Manovichliterary studiesmedia studiesmusical theatre • Noah Wardrip-Fruin • popular culture • popular entertainment • programmable mediasoftwaresoftware literacysoftware studiesstorytellingtext of codeThe Language of New Mediavisualisation • Walmart

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.