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Which clippings match 'Liberal Arts' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2013

Design genius or author as editor: filtering and synthesising?

"In 'What is an author?' [4], Michel Foucault says we are 'accustomed to presenting the author as a genius.' We see the author as the 'genial creator' of work in which he gives us, 'with infinite wealth and generosity,' an inexhaustible world of meanings. (Being 'creative' always has a positive ring, whatever is produced!) Foucault says that the author does not 'precede' the work: ideas and meanings are already there and the author's role is to 'choose,' to filter and synthesise to create output. (Foucault also emphasises 'limiting' and 'excluding'). The author's role is to limit the proliferation of meanings and present a personal view of the world. Yet the 'genius author' is represented as a continual source of invention–the opposite of his genuine function."

(Monika Parrinder, 2000, Eye Magazine)

TAGS

April Greiman • art and designart market • art star • artisanartist • artist myth • artistic solutions • Atelier Populaire • auteur theoryauthor as editorauthor as geniusavant-garde artists • being creative • blur boundaries • bohemian • Brigit Fowler • Bruce Mau • canonisation • celebritycliche • constructed idea • creative geniuscreative individuals • creative intuition • cult of the author • cult of the individual • cultural elite • Cunst Art • cutting-edge innovationsDavid Carsondesign community • Design Quarterly • design star • designer as author • editing through selectionEuropean EnlightenmentEye (magazine)fine art • Fran Cottell • genial creatorgenius • genius author • genius creator • genius mythgenius of the individual • genius status • graphic authorship • graphic design • Griselda Pollock • Hard Werken • history of ideas • ID Magazine • ingenue • innate talent • inspired visionaries • intuitioninventionJohn Maeda • John Walker • legitimate discipline • liberal artslone genius • lone pioneer • madman • maverick graphic designer • Michael Howe • Michael RockMichel Foucaultmodernismmyth of the geniusNeville Brodynon-conformist • ordinary mortal • Paul RandPentagram Designpersonapersonal expressionpersonal visionpersonalityPeter SavillePierre Bourdieupioneerromantic notion of the artist • Rozsika Parker • self-aggrandisement • self-taught • semi-divine status • solitary • spiritual insight • status • talenttaste (sociology) • Terry Jones • Tomato (design agency)tortured soul • ubermeister • visionary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2011

Design-based Learning for Knowledge-based Economies

"in the ninety years since the creation of the Bauhaus, design educators have constantly challenged the definition of design as a discipline, consequently reshaping the mission and vision of design programs. With the advent of the Bauhaus, design emerged as the integration of artistic methods with scientific principles in order to educate a new generation of artists and craftsmen and better train them to infuse humanistic values into industrial production systems. Later, with the incorporation of design into higher education, it became a self–contained discipline as part of the arts and sciences responsible for the production of knowledge, followed by a process of branching out to multiple specializations within the design discipline. Since then, designers have graduated as experts instrumental in the development of new products and communication strategies demanded by market economies. Curiously, while in the professional context the design discipline has been interpreted as business function, in education, design and business–related disciplines such as marketing, management, and finance were separated by ideological principles and credit distribution requirements. Consequently, the design, business, and liberal arts disciplines were never combined into one program, despite the clear signals that these disciplines are complementary and dependent on each other in terms of imagining new ways of infusing social and environmental principles within resilient production systems regulated by market economies."

(Carlos Teixeira, p.560–561, IASDR 2009)

1). Teixeira, C. (2009). The Entrepreneurial Design Curriculum: Design–based Learning for Knowledge–based Economies. International Association of Societies of Design Research. Seoul, Korea.

TAGS

2009academic disciplinesarts and sciencesBauhaus Schoolbusiness • Carlos Teixeira • creative industries • design as a discipline • design curriculumdesign educators • design enterprise • design managementdesign pedagogydesign-based learningdesignersentrepreneurship • humanistic values • IASDR • ideological principles • industrial production systems • integration of artistic methods with scientific principles • International Association of Societies of Design Researchknowledge-based economyliberal arts • market economies • multiple specialisations • new products • production systems • professional contextrealisation rulesrecontextualisation of knowledge • self-contained discipline • social and environmental principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Inconsistent design curricula and inexperienced guidance counsellors

"The vicissitudes of the market rarely dictate how many students will enroll in any given year because students' rationale for choosing a design major is not entirely pragmatic. They go to art and design schools to follow a 'creative' path, even though it may be a vague one. They could be 'natural–born artists' encouraged by family and friends to follow their muse, or they might be academically poor 'underachievers' for whom liberal arts holds little promise. Those enrolled in state or private universities or colleges majoring in graphic design may do so by default. Some enroll in fine arts programs because they love to paint, but they compromise (sometimes at the insistence of their parents) by entering communication arts programs. They may even concentrate on painting or printmaking as a minor, but graphic design is their degree goal because employment is necessary.

Despite increased visibility and recognition in the press, however, most students actually know very little about graphic design other than it pays better than fine art. A New York City high school guidance counselor consulted for this article admitted that she routinely sends her art students to art schools for 'general art' rather than focused design because she does not understand the distinction. 'I believe the student will figure out their major once in a program,' she says. But inconsistent design curricula adds to confusion, and when counselors and students are not familiar with the field itself, they cannot make informed decisions about which schools to attend, some of which are much more professionally oriented than others. Some entry requirements will only favor students who exhibit quantifiable potential, though considerably more have rather lenient enrollment policies, presuming that if a student can make a competent photograph or an imaginative collage, they can also be a graphic designer."

(Steven Heller, 08 September 2005)

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TAGS

academic scholarshipadmissions criteriaAIGAart and design schoolsart schoolsart studentscompromise • confusion • creative career • curriculum definition • design curriculadesign disciplineemployment • enrolment policies • entry requirements • fine art • general art • graphic designgraphic designer • guidance counsellors • high schoolinconsistencyliberal artsmarket forces • muse • NASAD • National Association of Schools of Art and Design • obfuscatepaintingpragmatismprintmaking • professional orientation • Steven Heller • student enrolment • university enrolmentvisibility and recognitionvisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical

"Before interdisciplinarity in either the disciplinary producing or disciplinary–circumscribing senses could manifest itself, disciplinarity itself had to take on its peculiarly modern form. Any assessment of interdisciplinarity – multi – and trans–, noncritical and critical– will benefit from an appreciation of this background.

Prior to the modern period, learning exhibited a kind of unity that might be called predisciplinary. Aristotle, it is true, introduced distinctions between logic, physics, and ethics, but these were never of a kind to raise the possibility of cross–disciplinary formations such as 'physical ethics.' During the Middle Ages, the division of the artes liberales into grammar, rhetoric, dialectic (the trivium), arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music (the quadrivium) ensured that the education of 'free men' included all the knowledge and skills needed to exercise their social roles. Insofar as it existed, disciplinary specialization was present more in the 'servile arts' of artisans and tradesmen. Not even teachers of the liberal arts became specialists in their different branches, because the idea of, for example, possessing arithmetic without grammar would have been considered a deformation of the mind. In the monastery schools, the unfettered pursuit of knowledge was viewed skeptically, criticized as curiositas, and therefore subject to disciplinization in a premodern behavioral sense. Only at the end of the Middle Ages, as the infinite pursuit of disciplinary knowledge took on the character of a spiritual activity, would Renaissance men become necessary to cross boundaries and synthesize diverse areas of learning."

(Robert Frodeman and Carl Mitcham, 2007, p.508)

[1][2] Frodeman, R. and C. Mitcham (2007). "New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical." Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society 27(6).

TAGS

Aristotlearithmetic • artes liberales • artisanastronomy • cross boundaries • cross-disciplinary • curiositas • dialecticdisciplinary knowledgedisciplinary specialisationdisciplinesdiscursive fielddivisionethicsEuropean Renaissance • free men • geometrygrammarinterdisciplinarityknowledgeknowledge integrationlearningliberal artslogicmiddle agesModern • modern period • monastery schools • multidisciplinaritymusicorderingphysics • predisciplinary • premodernpursuit of knowledgeQuadriviumrhetoricservile artsskillsocial construction of knowledgesocial rolesspecialisation • spiritual activity • synthesis • tradesmen • transdisciplinarityTrivium • unity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

The liberal and servile arts: internal justification versus external purpose

"'Liberal arts,' therefore, are ways of human action which have their justification in themselves; 'servile arts' are ways of human action that have a purpose outside of themselves, a purpose, to be more exact, which consists in a useful effect that can be realized through praxis. The 'liberality' or 'freedom' of the liberal arts consists in their not being disposable for purposes, that they do not need to be legitimated by a social function, by being 'work.'"

(Josef Pieper, 1998, p.41)

Pieper, J. (1998). 'Leisure, the Basis of Culture'. South Bend, Indiana, St. Augustine's Press.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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