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Which clippings match 'Art Practice' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2017

Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times

"Appropriation, first of all, is a common technique. People appropriate when they make things their own and integrate them into their way of life, by buying or stealing commodities, acquiring knowledge, claiming places as theirs and so on. Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times to adapt these artistic means to their own interests, or when they take objects, images or practices from popular (or foreign) cultures and restage them within the context of their work to either enrich or erode conventional definitions of what an artwork can be. As such, this technique could be described as comparatively timeless, or at least, as being practiced as long as modern society exists. For, ever since labour was divided and the abstract organization of social life alienated people from the way in which they would want to live, appropriation has been a practice of getting back from society what it takes from its members. At the same time, appropriation can be understood as one of the most basic procedures of modern art production and education. To cite, copy and modify exemplary works from art history is the model for developing art practice (neo)classicist tendencies have always championed. During the last two centuries this model was repeatedly challenged by advocates of the belief that modern individuals should produce radically new art by virture of their spontaneous creativity. The postmodern critics of this cult of individual genius in turn claimed that it is a gross ideological distortion to portray the making of art as a heroic act of original creation. Instead they advanced the paradigm of appropriation as a materialist model that describes art production as the gradual re-shuffling of a basic set of cultural terms through their strategical re-use and eventual transformation."

(Jan Verwoert, 2007)

ART&RESEARCH: A Journal of Ideas, Contexts and Methods, Volume 1. No. 2. Summer 2007, ISSN 1752-6388

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TAGS

2007 • acquiring knowledge • adopting concepts • adopting imagery • adopting ways of making art • appropriation practicesArt and Research (journal)art historyart practice • artistic appropriation • artistic meansartworkauthor as geniusauthorshipcitationcite • common creative technique • copy and modify • copy-and-paste culturecopying of artistic works • Craig Owens • creative genius • creative technique • cult of individual genius • cult of the author • Douglas Crimp • exemplary works • expropriation • Frederic Jameson • genial creatorgenius myth • heroic act • ideological distortion • Jan Verwoert • making of art • materialist model • modern art • modern art education • modern art production • neoclassicist tendencies • nothing is original • original creation • pastiche • postmodern critics • radically new art • Robert Longoromantic notion of the artist • spontaneous creativity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2014

MA in Art and Media Practice: Thinking Practices collaborative blog

TAGS

art practice • art practice as research • artefacts as evidence • artefacts as forms of knowledge • artist as theorist • Barbara Bolt • changing contexts • collaborative blog • Corina Caduff • course materials • creative practice as theory • critical art practice • culturally relevant research • enquiry in the visual arts • Estelle Barrett • Fiona Siegenthaler • Graeme Sullivan • Grant Kester • grounded research • imaginative enquiry • intellectual and imaginative enquiry • intellectual enquiry • Kathrin Busch • Linda Candy • MA in Art and Media Practice • making artworks • Michael BiggsPaula Roush • pigment to pixel • practice as theory • reliable insights • Tan Walchli • theorising visual arts practice • University of Westminstervisual arts research • visual arts research practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Bioglyphs: Generating images in collaboration with nature's events

"Reconstructive postmodernism proposes an alternative to a mechanistic interpretation of the world. The mechanistic model, which assumes that the world consists of discrete objects, has led to a 'disenchanted' interpretation of nature. In contrast to this objectification, the reconstructive model interprets nature as being primarily constituted of interacting events.

Since the 1960s ecological artists have developed strategies of representing this reenchanted view of nature through its phenomena or events. A number of these artists have sought to use photography to represent this view. However when such works are presented in photographic form I argue that the use of a camera tends to objectify the event.

In order to avoid the objectifying tendency of photography a number of contemporary artists have developed photographic methods of image–making which dispense with the camera. Bioglyphs, the creative practice of this current research, have been linked to the work of this group because of a shared approach to the use of photographic materials. However, if we assess the role of icon and index within photography, we can see that this approach may not always be sympathetic to the project of these artists.

Three key outcomes are identified. The first is the clarification of the concepts icon and index as applied to photography. Photographic images are shown to be primarily iconic rather than indexical. The thesis argues that iconic images tend to objectify the world whereas indexical images tend to represent the world as being constituted by events. Iconic photographic images therefore contribute to a disenchanted view of the world.

The second is that this reassessment of icon and index highlights a clear distinction between bioglyphs and most of the other camera–less images with which they are associated. In contrast to the iconicity of camera–less photographs bioglyphs are shown to be radically indexical. The third outcome is to show that, methodologically and interpretationally, bioglyphs have more affiliation with other artworks that are primarily indexical. This realignment of bioglyphs with other indexical art proposes a new category of art practice. This new category of indexical art, which foregrounds nature's events, suggests a method of art practice that is more supportive of reconstructive postmodern ideas."

(Daro Montag, 2000)

Montag, D. "Bioglyphs: generating images in collaboration with nature's events". PhD, University of Hertfordshire, 2000.

TAGS

art practice • bioglyph • camera-less • camera-less images • contemporary artcreative practice • disenchanted • ecological artists • icon • icon and index • iconic photographic images • iconicity • image making • image-making • index • indexical • indexical art • indexical images • interacting events • interpretation of nature • mechanistic interpretations • mechanistic modelnature • objectification • objectify • objectify the event • objectifying tendency • objectifying tendency of photography • phenomena • photographic form • photographic images • photographic materials • photographic methods • photographyreconstructive model • reconstructive postmodernism • theoretical contextthesisUniversity of Hertfordshireview of nature

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2009

Research as a mode of construction; engaging with the artefact in art and design research

"We contend that it is entirely feasible, and indeed desirable, to provide training for research degree students in art and design based on the premise that, firstly, research is a viable mode of art and design practice, as it is for the practices of the engineer or the doctor; and that secondly, to move from practice to research depends on the potential for conceiving the artefact as divisible into an ordered arrangement of parts that can be articulated as elements of a research process, whose primary outcome is knowledge. The need to understand that practice and research entail differences in terms of approach, outcome and constituency is as important for supervisors as it is for research degree candidates themselves. In an institutional environment in which the modernist concept of the object as an assemblage is a cliché, and within which we all pay lip service to the idea of research process, transferable knowledge is the last taboo. Knowledge transfer is taboo because it seems to violate the terms of the art and design artefact, in a way that radical design practice and conceptual art could never do. Moving beyond this taboo requires us to think of new forms of causality, economy and teleology for the art and design artefact, within an economy of research."

(Dr Naren Barfield & Dr Malcolm Quinn Glasgow School of Art, Scotland and Wimbledon School of Art, England)

Barfield, N. & M. Quinn (2004). "Research as a mode of construction; engaging with the artefact in art and design research", Working Papers in Art and Design 3 Retrieved from URL http://www.herts.ac.uk/artdes/research/papers/wpades/vol3/nbfull.html ISSN 1466–4917

TAGS

2004applied researchart practiceartefactartistic practicecausalityconceptualisationcreative practicedesign artefactdesign practicediscovery • economy of research • enquiryknowledgepedagogy • radical design practice • research • research degree • research methodologyresearch process • research supervision • theory building • transferable knowledge • Working Papers in Art and Design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2005

Topography Of Action: To Rise Above Or Drop Below A Field Of Experience

Clive Cazeaux pp. 44–56
What this topography of action brings to the theory–practice debate is a way of thinking which allows art theory and art practice to stand alongside each other as mutually supportive 'interventions' in the development of an artwork. On this account, both theory and practice can be understood as gestures which make a difference, make something stand out, rise above or drop below an otherwise undifferentiated field of experience. While we are probably accustomed to thinking of art practice as a form of action, it needs to be borne in mind that activity, i.e. activity in general, is being viewed here from a particular, existentialist perspective. With [Jean–Paul] Sartre, we are theorizing the action as an event, a moment, a rupture, something which makes a difference where there was previously no difference at all, and which thereby allows the subject to orient itself in terms of the objects it encounters. Approaching the art–making process in these terms requires us to think about the way in which the work develops as a series of ruptures or saliences...

TAGS

art practiceart theory • Cazeaux • field of experience • Jean-Paul Sartrerupturesaliencesubject • theory-practice • topography of action
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