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Which clippings match 'Better-functioning Products' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 MARCH 2012

Integrating the process of design thinking into the classroom

"When you think of design thinking, think of innovative outcomes – like the iPod, or that perfect peeler that both cuts well and has an amazing grip, or the Aravind Eye Care system that allows for thousands of underresourced families in India to address cataract issues.

Pioneers of design thinking called it the process of 'a practical, creative resolution of problems or issues that looks for an improved future result' (Simon, 1969). Recently, educational researchers have been asking what happens when educators integrate the process of design thinking into the classroom. Their findings include numerous examples of enhanced student learning."

(Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, Atlanta)

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TAGS

21st centurybetter-functioning productschildrenclassroomcollaborationcomplexity • constructivist theories of learning • convergent thinking • creative resolution of problems • creativitycreativity skillscritical thinking • D.E.E.P. • design approach • design innovationdesign responsibilitydesign thinking • design thinking approach • design thinking in classroomdesign-based learningdesign-oriented thinking • deviate from facts • Discover Empathise Experiment Produce • divergent thinkingeducationeducatoreffective communication • enhanced student learning • experimentation • exploring possibilities • hands on • Herbert Simon • innovative outcomes • K-4 • know-how • learning as a social activity • multidisciplinary teams • MVPS • pedagogyproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproduct design • science concepts • science lab • scripted approach to enquiry • socio-technological dimensionssolving problemsspeculative designstudent achievementteaching science • traditional learning frameworks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2011

You can have a garden: Edible Island Planters

"Eliza Donald couldn't find a large enough planter that suited her purposes, so decided to make her own. 'It took two years, working with plant specialists, and industrial designers, also asking a lot of people questions. It's important that a design functions well but it's equally important to ask why a person would want to use it in the first place,' she says. Eliza is now director of Edible Islands – handy aesthetically lovely planters the size of a small bathtub. You can plant out your veggies and a small tree, or once all your herbs die (if you have my touch) you can pop a lid on and just sit under your tree. Ingenious.

As Eliza points out, the potential benefits are plentiful, 'Sometimes people don't have an easy access to fresh veg. The planters help with Transition Towns – educating people on how to grow their own food and prevention of depression as people swap seeds, plants and recipes, and grow plants with their grandchildren. They increase flight pathways across cities for birds, bees and butterflies as more Edible Island Planters are put on roof tops, back yards, and schools.' The planters are all made in Pakenham, Australia."

(Lou Pardi, (small)LUST, 02 August 2011)

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TAGS

Australia • backyard • bathtubbetter-functioning productsbusiness women • domestic furniture • ecodesign • Edible Island Planters • Edible Islands • Eliza Donald • entrepreneurshipenvironmentally conscious design • fresh food • gardeninggreen design • grow your own food • herbs • industrial designkiwi ingenuity • Little Veggie Patch Company • Pakenham • planter • plantsproduct designproduct designerprotoductionresearch and developmentrooftopseedself-sufficientsustainable agriculture • sustainable cities • sustainable landscape and garden design • swappingtransition towns • veggies • women designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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