Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Art Of Code' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 FEBRUARY 2013

Universal Everything & Field: Deutsche Bank Hong Kong

"FIELD were invited by Universal Everything to bring their concepts to life using realtime code. A unique and unrepeatable experience amazes staff and guests every time they walk by this 12m wide screen installation at Deutsche Bank Hong Kong. The 8 ever–changing video artworks show atmospheric cityscapes, hand–drawn sceneries, patterns and landscape animations. All generated in realtime, passers–by are invited to discover new details every day."

(Marcus Wendt and Vera–Maria Glahn, 2010)

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TAGS

20103D animationart of code • atmospheric cityscape • audiovisual • brand art • computational designdata visualisationDeutsche Bank • Deutsche Bank Hong Kong • Deutsche Bank Media Wall • digital print • digital screensexperience design • Field (collective) • financial datafinancial data visualisationgenerative designHong Konginteractive installation • landscape animations • Marcus Wendt • Matt Pyke • pattern • Pete Seaward • real-timerealtime animation • realtime code • realtime generated visualssite-specific visualisationUniversal Everything • Vera-Maria Glahn • video artwork

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2012

Joshua Nimoy: representing digital culture in film

"I take representing digital culture in film very seriously in lieu of having grown up in a world of very badly researched user interface greeble. I cringed during the part in Hackers (1995) when a screen saver with extruded 'equations' is used to signify that the hacker has reached some sort of neural flow or ambiguous destination. I cringed for Swordfish and Jurassic Park as well. I cheered when Trinity in The Matrix used nmap and ssh (and so did you). Then I cringed again when I saw that inevitably, Hollywood had decided that nmap was the thing to use for all its hacker scenes (see Bourne Ultimatum, Die Hard 4, Girl with Dragon Tattoo, The Listening, 13: Game of Death, Battle Royale, Broken Saints, and on and on). In Tron, the hacker was not supposed to be snooping around on a network; he was supposed to kill a process. So we went with posix kill and also had him pipe ps into grep. I also ended up using emacs eshell to make the terminal more l33t. The team was delighted to see my emacs performance –– splitting the editor into nested panes and running different modes. I was tickled that I got emacs into a block buster movie. I actually do use emacs irl, and although I do not subscribe to alt.religion.emacs, I think that's all incredibly relevant to the world of Tron."

(Joshua T. Nimoy)

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13: Game of Death • Adobe • alt.religion.emacs • Andy King • art of code • Battle Royale • blockbuster • Bourne Ultimatum • Bradley Munkowitz • Broken Saints • C++CG • CG artist • Cinema 4D • code • Consumer eXperience Design • CXD • David Lewandowski • Die Hard 4 • digital culture • Digital Domain • Emacs • emacs eshell • emacs irl • Eshell • film • Girl with Dragon Tattoo • GREPhacker • Hackers (film) • Hollywood • Houdini (software) • Jake Sargeant • Jurassic Park (film) • l33t • Linux • Media and Visual Designer • network • nmap • OpenFrameworksOpenGL • pipe ps • POSIX • posix kill • Processing (software) • screen saver • software artspecial effects • SSH • Swordfish (film) • terminal • The Listening • The Matrix (1999)Tron • TRON: Legacy • user interfaceVFX • wxWidgets

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2008

Generator.x Art from code

"Generator.x is a conference and exhibition examining the current role of software and generative strategies in art and design [... it] is a curatorial platform exploring the use of generative strategies and software processes in digital art, architecture and design. It focuses on a new generation of artists and designers who embrace code as a way of producing new forms of creative expression.

Computational strategies are having an impact in many creative fields. Generator.x was set up to examine the following topics in particular:

Generative aesthetics: How can generative strategies successfully be applied to aesthetic problems? Whether the aim is provide a design solution or simply to explore the dynamic qualities of a given system, the process requires translating intuitive creative choices into rules and machine–readable code. What are the criteria for an interesting solution, what parameters and boundary conditions can be manipulated to produce satisfying results?

Designing processes: A computational approach to design changes static objects into dynamic processes. What implications does this have for design and architecture, whether used for analysis, aesthetic expression or information visualisation?

Performative software: Musicians and visual performers are using generative systems to create custom software instruments for live performance, as well as to produce direct synaesthetic mappings between sound and image. How can a software instrument approach the complexity and expressive range of a physical instrument that has been perfected over centuries?

Software by creatives for creatives: Artists and designers are increasingly creating their own software to meet special needs not covered by commercial packages, sharing their results as Open Source."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2004

The Art of Code

"What effects is digitisation having on art? What special characteristics are displayed by code–based art? And how does this inherent, uniquely self–determined expressive vocabulary of digital art manifest itself? What consequences will art as code–according to Kriesche, alone the generative answer to the complete permeation of all partial realities–have for the ongoing development of the arts? In which direction is artists' work with new instruments like algorithms and dynamic systems transforming the process of artistic creativity? Or is the concentration on CODE, this focus on the immediate basis of the technological transformation of art, proceeding along the wrong path, and should the confrontation with media art concentrate on social approaches–collaborative, social modes of action, the potential of connective interfaces–without which there can be no productive and uniquely self–determined human activity?"
(Roy Ascott, Richard Kriesche, Casey Reas, Giaco Schiesser, Roman Verostko, 2003, Ars Electronica)

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2003abstractionart of codeCasey Reascodedigital artdigital culturedigitisation • Giaco Schiesser • Richard Kriesche • Roman VerostkoRoy Ascottvisualisation
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