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Which clippings match 'William Gibson' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Design Fiction, Science Fiction and Literary Criticism

"Design Fiction is a recent spin–off of Science Fiction, directly inspired by many of the imagined worlds of writers like Bruce Sterling, William Gibson, J.G. Ballard and others. It sets out to do many of the same things as Sci–Fi does, but in a more concrete way, by introducing real physical objects or real sets of rules and scenarios which require the participation (direct or indirect, voluntary or involuntary) of users, beyond just their emotional and intellectual engagement. In this way Design Fiction can 'test' objects or tools or storylines that Science Fiction, until recently, has not been able to. A literary work, has (in general) been a fixed text until very recently, and so even though readers have enjoyed many different readings and interpretations, the author has not been able to adapt or react to their responses. Design Fiction allows the inventor or storytellers to adapt their scenario as it evolves and as the users or participants give their reactions."

(Charles Beckett, How to Think About The Future)

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TAGS

alternative possible futures • Bruce Sterling • conscious metaphor • design fictiondigital technologyfictional setting • future speculation • future technologiesfuturologyInanimate AliceJ G Ballard • Jake Dugarden • Julian Bleeckerliterary criticismMichio Kaku • nascent practice • Near Future Laboratory • PerplexCity (project) • Philip K. Dickphilosophical questionsPhysics of the Impossible (2008)prototypingSascha Pohfleppsci-fi • sci-fi science • science fictionspeculative designspeculative physicsspeculative prototypesStar TrekStar Warstest concepts • test out • test your ideas • what-if scenarios • William Gibson • World Without Oil (project)

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
08 NOVEMBER 2012

Max Headroom: an anarchic and irreverent cybernetic protagonist

"Max Headroom was one of the most innovative science fiction series ever produced for American television, an ambitious attempt to build upon the cyberpunk movement in science fiction literature. The character of Max Headroom, the series's unlikely cybernetic protagonist, was originally introduced in a 1984 British television movie, produced by Peter Wagg, and starring Canadian actor Matt Frewer. ABC brought the series to American television in March 1987, refilming the original movie as a pilot but recasting most of the secondary roles. The ABC series attracted critical acclaim and a cult following, but only lasted for fourteen episodes. The anarchic and irreverent Max went on to become an advertising spokesman for Coca–Cola and to host his own talk show on the Cinemax cable network."

(The Museum of Broadcast Communications)

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TAGS

1980s198780s television • American television • anarchicBlade Runner (1982)Bruce SterlingCoca-Colacomputer animation • cult following • cyberneticcyberpunk • cyberpunk movement • cyberspace • irreverent • Matt Frewer • Max Headroom • Museum of Broadcast CommunicationsNeuromancer • Pat Cadigan • Peter Wagg • Rudy Ruckerscience fiction literaturescience fiction television series • telefilm • televisiontelevision series • The Road Warrior • TVWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 APRIL 2012

Bryan Rieger: Rethinking the Mobile Web

"A few months back I submitted the smallest speck of an idea for a talk I was hoping to present at Over The Air in London. Having presented at Over The Air before I assumed my experiences this time around would more or less be the same – a chance to bounce a few of my recent thoughts off two–dozen or so UK developers.

To suggest that my assumption was wrong would in–fact be a massive understatement...

Three weeks later, the dust is still settling on the 90,000 140,000 presentation views, hundreds of tweets, and multitude of conversations, and I finally have time to provide the presentation with a much–needed introduction."

(Bryan Rieger)

Fig.1 "Rethinking the Mobile Web" by Yiibu

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TAGS

abstraction layer • accessible and inclusive mobile experiences • adaptive layoutAJAXAndroid OSApple • Bada • BlackBerry LtdBMW • Bryan Rieger • cHTML • CSS animations • CSS3device • DeviceAtlas • feature phone • featurephone • Fennec • Google (GOOG)HTMLHTML5Internet accessInternet ExploreriOSiPhone • Java ME • JavaME • market sharemedia queries • media types • MicroB • mobile browsermobile devices • mobile internet users • mobile operating systems • mobile web • most used devices • Nokia • Nokia Qt • Obigo • OBML • one web • Opera Binary Markup Language • OperaMini • optimised for mobile • Over The Air • Palm (OS) • phone • popular devices • presentation • real web • Rethinking the Mobile Web • Samsung • Skyfire • SlideSharesmartphoneSony Ericsson • SquirrelFish • standards support • SVG • Symbian • tabbed browsingtechnology • UK developers • w810i • WAP • WebKit • WebOS • William GibsonWindows Mobile • WML • WURFL • Yii

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2011

Cyberpunk: the future has already happened

"Cyberpunk' is a 60–minute documentary, the ad for which states: 'What started as a book became a literary movement. What was a literary movement became a subculture'.

And that's one of the major flaws of this film. It perpetuates the general myth that everything 'cyberpunk' expanded out of 'Neuromancer' and Gibson's vision. In truth, most of the stuff covered here (virtual reality, hacking, industrial music, cybernetics, designer drugs, anarchy) was already developing quite nicely before Lord Gibson, Chairman Bruce, and the rest (Shirley, Rucker, Shiner) were kind enough to provide a fictional universe in which to fuse these disparate explorations.

The production of 'Cyberpunk' is very inconsistent, too –– some parts are professional documentary, while other parts have the odor of quick–cash opportunism. The breathy women narrator is ultimately aggravating, oh–ing and ah–ing over all this stuff.

But there is some good material here, including interviews with Gibson, Leary, Scott Fisher (of NASA/Ames), Brenda Laurel, Vernon Reed (Living Color), Bill Leeb (Front Line Assembly) and others. There's also some cool computer graphics (circa 1989) and an industrial soundtrack with Front Line Assembly, Ministry, and Severed Heads.

'Cyberpunk' is still a must–see since it's the only documentary about cyberpunk that we have."

(G. Branwyn)

Fig.1 Produced and Directed by Marianne Trench and Peter von Brandenberg, Intercon Productions, 1990.

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TAGS

1990 • anarchy • augmentation • Bill Leeb • bodybody modificationBrenda Laurel • Bruce Bethke • computer graphics • computer virus • corporeal augmentationcyberneticscyberpunk • Cyberpunk (1990) • cyborgdesigner drugsdystopiaembodimentethicsfictional universe • Front Line Assembly • hackinghacktivismhuman beings • industrial music • informationinformation wants to be free • John Shirley • Lewis Shiner • Living Color • Mariana TrenchMinistry (band)mutant scienceNASA Ames Research CenterNeuromancerorgan • phone phreaking • posthumanRudy Ruckersci-fiScott Fisher • Severed Heads (band) • speculative designtechnological determinismtechnophobiaTimothy Leary • Vernon Reed • virtual realityvirusvisions of the futureVRWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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