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Which clippings match 'Parallel Universe' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 MAY 2012

2010 IMPACT!: the 5th Dimensional Camera

"'With their evocative multidimensional camera, the designers have attempted to embody Hugh Everett's many–worlds theory in an object that adds to the cinematic tradition of The Matrix (1999), Lost (2004–10), Fringe (2008–ongoing), and Source Code (2011), to name just a few.

With researchers working to harness the the peculiar workings of our subatomic world, we, as designers, were given an opportunity to explore the implications of one of its more concrete and immediate applications: quantum computing.

Working with EPSRC, NESTA, the RCA, and a group of scientists from the Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (QIPIRC), the 5th Dimensional Camera was produced for the 2010 IMPACT! exhibition as a metaphorical representation of quantum computation – a fictional device capable of capturing glimpses of parallel universes."

(Superflux Ltd.)

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TAGS

2010 • 2010 IMPACT! • 5th dimension • 5th Dimensional Camera • blending physics • cameradesignersEPSRC • exploring implications • fictional devices • Fringe (television) • futures studies • futurologyHugh EverettIndia • Lost (television) • Many Worlds Interpretation • Many Worlds theory • metaphormetaphorical representationmultiple dimensionsNESTAparallel universe • parallel universes • product design • QIPIRC • quantum computation • quantum computing • Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration • quantum mechanicsRCAresearchersscientistsSource Code (2011)speculative designspeculative researchspeculative science • subatomic world • Superflux (consultancy) • tangible prototypeThe Matrix (1999)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2012

Rob Bryanton: Imagining the 10th Dimension

"Since the extra dimensions beyond spacetime that physicists talk about are all spatial dimensions (or 'space–like' as some prefer to say), thinking about how the simplest spatial dimensions relate one to another gives us tools for imagining the more complex ones. The key to remember with all this is that each additional spatial dimension is at 'right angles' to the one before: so each new dimension allows an observer to see 'around the corner' in a way that was unattainable from the previous dimension. This time, let's work through the dimensions with that idea in mind."

(Rob Bryanton, October 2009)

Rob Bryanton (2006). "Imagining the Tenth Dimension: A New Way of Thinking About Time and Space", Trafford Publishing.

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TAGS

10th dimension • 20065th dimensionabstractionanimated presentationcausalitycausally relatedconceptual metaphorconceptualisationcontemporaneous • cosmological horizon • dimensionality • dimensionsEdwin A. Abbott • enfolded symmetry • flat spacefree will • Gevin Giorbran • god • granularity • hologramHugh Everett • hyperspace • in perspective • infinity • information space • Kurt Godel • lineline in spaceMany Worlds Interpretationmathematics • Michael Shermer • multiple dimensions • multiverse • objective reality • omni-directional • omniverse • organising pattern • parallel universeperspectivephysics • planck length • planepointprobabilistic outcomes • probability space • quantum mechanics • quantum physics • quantum wave function • Rob Bryanton • science • Sean Carroll • space • space-like • space-time • spatial dimension • spatial dimensions • string theorytime • two-dimensional plane • universevisual representations of mathematical conceptsvisual scientific representationszero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

A Town Called Panic: stop-motion film about three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse

"Hilarious and frequently surreal, the stop–motion extravaganza A Town Called Panic has endless charms and raucous laughs for children from eight to eighty. Based on the Belgian animated cult TV series (which was released by Wallace & Gromits Aardman Studios), Panic stars three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse who share a rambling house in a rural town that never fails to attract the weirdest events.

Cowboy and Indians plan to gift Horse with a homemade barbeque backfires when they accidentally buy 50 million bricks. Whoops! This sets off a perilously wacky chain of events as the trio travel to the center of the earth, trek across frozen tundra and discover a parallel underwater universe of pointy–headed (and dishonest!) creatures. Each speedy character is voiced – and animated – as if they are filled with laughing gas. With panic a permanent feature of life in this papier–mâché burg, will Horse and his equine paramour – flame–tressed music teacher Madame Longray (Jeanne Balibar) – ever find a quiet moment alone? A sort of Gallic Monty Python crossed with Art Clokey on acid, A Town Called Panic is zany, brainy and altogether insane–y!."

(Adriana Piasek–Wanski)

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TAGS

2009 • A Town Called Panic • Aardman Studios • Adriana Piasek-Wanski • animatedanimated filmanimation • Art Clokey • barbeque • BelgianBelgium • brainy • cowboycreaturecultFrancefrozenhorseIndian • Jeanne Balibar • low-fiLuxembourgMonty Python • Panique au Village • paper mache • papier-mache • parallel universeplastic toys • Stephane Aubier • stop motion • tundra • TVTV seriesunderwater • Vincent Patar • zany

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2004

Cyberspace: Parallel Universe

"Perhaps the most striking transformation effected by these technologies is the change in our perceptions of materiality, space, and information, which is bound directly or indirectly to affect how we understand architecture, habitation, and the built environment. These changes are most apparent in the development of complex systems of simulation, storage, and circulation of information and representation now labeled cyberspace and virtual reality. Cyberspace has been considered a 'parallel' universe to our own, generated and sustained by global communications networks and computers linking disparate physical spaces and individuals through a shared virtual space, the space of linked, networked computers and their users."

(Elizabeth Grosz, p.132)

Elizabeth Grosz (2001). "Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space", MIT Press.

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