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Which clippings match 'Las Vegas' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 APRIL 2011

Flickr: Anatomy of a Long Photograph

"Earlier this month flickr announced that short video clips could now be uploaded to the popular photo site. Some photo purists were skeptical, even spawning a huge 'No Video on Flickr' group. After all, the sanctity of the best still images, rich in implied meaning, could be diluted by zillions 90 second video clips of someone's keg party (and we already have other sites, like YouTube for that). Flickr said the ninety–second limit was to encourage 'long photos.' There are contemporary videographers and filmmakers who have used video or film to create sublime still images: the best long photos. And one of my favorites is Godfrey Reggio.

I will never forget the first time I saw Koyaanisqatsi, Reggio's 1983 film about contemporary 'life out of balance.' I was mesmerized by his long drawn out shots. It gave me time to study the scene and, in part, that was the point: to stop moving and consider the consequences of going through life at an increasing interstellar speed. Sometimes there was lots of activity in the frame. But there were times when he pointed his camera at a scene that, on first glance, appeared to be a photograph. It was a still image with all the implications connected with still photography: observations of a slice of frozen time and a consideration of the photographer's framing and associations within that frame.

Yet given the chance to observe closely there was movement. The characters in this 'still' were breathing and blicking and moving. When I saw his scene of Las Vegas waitresses standing still but not still, I was blown away (the vernacular I used in the early 80s when I first saw the film). To this day it is my most favorite scene of any movie I have ever watched. I literally held my breath for its entire duration wondering how long it would go on. The intensity of that shot was immense. It forced me to really look. And that has always been my goal as a photographer: to make people observe what's going on inside my images for as long as I can. That is the mark of a successful photograph. Not so easy in a culture heavy with daily sound and sight bites always vying for our attention and beckoning us to move quickly from one to another."

(Jeff Gates, 21April 2008, Life Outtacontext)

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TAGS

19832008 • 90 seconds • choreography • environmental portrait • Flickr • Godfrey Reggio • intensity • Koyaanisqatsi (1982) • Las Vegas • life out of balance • living pictures • long drawn out shots • long photo • long photos • motion photograph • ninety-seconds • observationphotograph • short video clips • shotslice of frozen time • standing still • stasisstill imagestop moving and consider the consequences • study the scene • video clipwaitressYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

The evolution of Postmodernism

"On the way to postmodern, the struggle to reform modern capitalism's dark side, fragmented into a thousand strands. An era approach is rejected – dating the arrival of postmodernism is impossible as is the construction of a linear episodic narrative, moving from the premodern to the modern and then to postmodern. Instead postmodern methods, theories, and worldviews proliferate, as do modern and premodern ones. There are numerous postmodern approaches ranging from naive postmodernism (McPostmodernism) that hails the arrival of postindustrial and complex/adaptive organizations, Baudrillard's and Lyotard's versions of radical breaks from modernity, to others seeking more integration with critical theory. Some claim to have moved beyond postmodern to something called postpostmodern that would include hybrids (postmodern variants with modern and premodern), language 'heteroglossia' (the coexistence of many voices at the same time in tension with each other), and various 'dark side postmoderns' looking at global reterritorialization, postmodern war, postcolonialism and the ills of capitalism"

(David M. Boje, 2007)

1). Postmodernism – by David M. Boje (2007) To appear in Yiannis Gabriel's Thesaurus, London: Oxford University Press, forthcoming

TAGS

Bruno Latourcapitalismconsumption spectaclecritical theorycritiquedeconstruction • Douglas Kellner • episodic narrative • Fredric Jameson • Gibson Burrell • grand narrativesGulf WarGuy Debordheteroglossia • history of philosophy • iPodJacques DerridaJean BaudrillardJean-Francois LyotardJurgen HabermaslanguageLas Vegas • Linda Smircich • Marta B Calas • McDonalds • McPostmodernism • Michel FoucaultmodernismmodernityNietzscheNikePeter Druckerpost-structuralismpostindustrialPostmodernpostmodernismpremodernreterritorialisation • Steven Best • Stewart R. Clegg • Vietnam war • Wal-Mart • William Bergquist • World War IWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2010

PlaySport: naming by consensus

"For those companies willing to make the cultural commitment to the instantaneous praise and bashing served up 140 characters at a time on Twitter, the rewards can be considerable.

Jeffrey Hayzlett, Kodak's chief marketing officer, said that he learned firsthand after the company originally debuted its Zi8 waterproof, pocket–sized HD video camera earlier this year. ...

Most companies would either ignore the panning or, perhaps, send the product back to the sales and marketing gurus to come up with a better name.

Kodak didn't. Instead, this summer it took the naming process to the people via Twitter, asking the great unwashed masses on the microblogging site to see if they could come up with something better. The winner, or winners as it turns out, were promised a free trip to Vegas for this year's CES and will have their likeness displayed in some way on the product's packaging.

From the thousands of tweets received from the crowdsourcing experiment, Kodak combined two fairly mundane suggestions –– 'Play' and 'Sport' –– to derive the new moniker 'PlaySport.' It's not rocket science but, according to Hayzlett, it's a damn sight better than Zi8."

(Larry Barrett, 7 January 2010)

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TAGS

140 characters2010brandbrand awarenessbrand recognitioncampaign • CES • Consumer Electronics Show • HD • Jeffrey Hayzlett • KodakLas Vegasmicrobloggingnaming process • PlaySport • productsocial mediasocial networkingTwittervideo camera • Zi8 waterproof

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2005

Las Vegas Eclecticism: Aesthetic Inclusion

Brad West
In the ground breaking work Learning from Las Vegas, Robert Venturi and his colleagues from the Yale School of Art and Architecture (1977) signalled a turn in the analysis of post–modern architecture by celebrating the Las Vegas strip with its neon lights, billboards and themed hotels and casinos. For Venturi et al. the built environment of Las Vegas, unlike modernist architecture which is obsessed with "space, structure and program… a dry expressionism, empty and boring" (1977:103), communicated with ordinary people by mirroring the commercial and transportation logic of contemporary society. Las Vegas's eclecticism with its emphasis on playful rather than grandiose and monumental uniform design, they argue, is essentially one of aesthetic inclusion that promotes meaningful interpretation and attachment.

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TAGS

architectureeclecticismLas Vegas • Venturi
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