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23 DECEMBER 2010

The Six Million Dollar Man: the evolution of an iconic title sequence

"The Six Million Dollar Man started off as a novel by [Martin Caidin] called Cyborg, but over the course of its development from book to movie to TV show, it not only changed name, it changed tone.

The book is essentially a thriller that tries to ground itself in reality as much as possible to make Steve Austin a super–spy. Sure he has a bionics left arm (yes, bionics in the book, not bionic), bionics legs and bionics eye. But he can't feel anything in his bionics limbs and his bionics eye won't let him see, only take pictures. And sure, he's very strong, but when he kicks a golf ball, that bionics toe of his still gets crushed by the impact.

It was bionics, but still tried to be relatively aware of the laws of physics and what was practical."

(The Medium is Not Enough TV blog, 9 July 2010)

TAGS

197219741978accidentartificialartificial limbastronautaugmentationback story • biomechatronics • Bionic Womanbionicsbodycinematic conventionsconventionscorporeal augmentationcrashcyberneticscyborgexpositionhero • Lee Majors • Lindsay Wagner • Martin Caidinmasculinity • Oscar Goldman • pilot episodeprosthesisresurrectionsci-fisequence designSix Million Dollar ManspySteve Austinsurgerytelevisionthrillertitle sequenceTVvisual designvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2007

Chernobyl legacy: photographic essay with audio commentary

"On April 26th, 1986, Chernobyl's Reactor No. 4 unleashed a thoroughly modern plague that emptied cities, condemned entire regions, and seeped invisibly into the bodies of those exposed to its destructive presence."
(Paul Fusco, Magnum In Motion)

[Photographer Paul Fusco faces the dark legacy of Chernobyl, focusing on the horrifying human consequences of the event that is now 20 years in the past. Fusco's work forces us to remember an important nightmare that we would forget at the peril of our morality and our future.]

Fig.1 Photographic essay (with audio commentary) created by Paul Fusco about the human cost of the Chernobyl disaster.

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TAGS

1986artificialBelarusbodycancerChernobylconsequencesdeformitydisastergrotesquehospitalhumanlegacy • Minsk • moralitymutantmutationnightmarenuclear disaster • Paul Fusco • photographic essay • plague • radiationradioactive contaminationscience
15 OCTOBER 2006

Bodymouse: The Potential Of Biomedical Science?

Chris Lomaka's Bodymouse concept drawing is an design experiment that plays with biomorphic form. It does this in a manner that seems to suggest a point in time where devices like computer mice may be able to be grown or raised like livestock. The design could be seen to be a comment on our reliance on biomedical science and its inevitable redefinition of boundaries between technology and the body. [view PDF portfolio]

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TAGS

3Danthropomorphismartificialbio-ethicsbiomedicalbizarrebody • Bodymouse • CG • Chris Lomaka • creationgrotesquehumanmousemutantsciencespeculative design
08 APRIL 2005

Frankenstein: The Disappointment of Scientific Creation

"Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty. As the minuteness of the parts formed a great hindrance to my speed, I resolved, contrary to my first intention, to make the being of a gigantic stature; that is to say about eight feet in height, and proportionately large. How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form? His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful!– Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart."

(Mary Shelley, 1818)

[Victor Frankenstein describes the disappointment of his scientific creation.]

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02 MARCH 2005

Mutant Bodies: Bio-ethical Issues

"'We Are Family' brings a fresh, personal perspective to some of the most difficult bio–ethical issues of our time. Her work explores the changing relationship between what is considered natural and what is artificial, what is 'normal' and 'mutant'. Her works embody our dreams of perfect children and disease–free life, yet always articulate the value of difference and uncertainty. The 'family' portraits are created using a variety of media including videos and sculpture."

(Australian Arts Festival Japan, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, 2003)

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