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Which clippings match 'Writing Tips' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 MARCH 2014

This American Life: Ira Glass on good taste and making good work

Kinetic type interpretation of "Ira Glass on Storytelling, part 3 of 4" by David Shiyang Liu.

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TAGS

2009advice for studentsAfter Effects • artful elegance • beginners • craftsmanship • creative beginnings • creative potentialcreative skillscreative visioncreative work • encouragement • encouraging advice • expressive repertoiregood tasteindividual experience • Ira Glass • kinetic type • kinetic typographylong-term successmasterymotion graphicsmotion typeperseverance • personal ambition • personal taste • public radio • Public Radio International (PRI) • quit • radio production • radio show • sage advice • skilful masteryskill • skill-building • skilled behaviourskillful copingtaste (sociology) • This American Life (radio show) • visual interpretationwriting tips

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2013

George Orwell: Politics and the English Language

"Dying metaphors. A newly invented metaphor assists thought by evoking a visual image, while on the other hand a metaphor which is technically 'dead' (e.g. iron resolution) has in effect reverted to being an ordinary word and can generally be used without loss of vividness. But in between these two classes there is a huge dump of worn–out metaphors which have lost all evocative power and are merely used because they save people the trouble of inventing phrases for themselves. Examples are: Ring the changes on, take up the cudgel for, toe the line, ride roughshod over, stand shoulder to shoulder with, play into the hands of, no axe to grind, grist to the mill, fishing in troubled waters, on the order of the day, Achilles' heel, swan song, hotbed. Many of these are used without knowledge of their meaning (what is a 'rift,' for instance?), and incompatible metaphors are frequently mixed, a sure sign that the writer is not interested in what he is saying. Some metaphors now current have been twisted out of their original meaning without those who use them even being aware of the fact. For example, toe the line is sometimes written as tow the line. Another example is the hammer and the anvil, now always used with the implication that the anvil gets the worst of it. In real life it is always the anvil that breaks the hammer, never the other way about: a writer who stopped to think what he was saying would avoid perverting the original phrase."

(George Orwell)

George Orwell (1950). "Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays", Secker & Warburg Publishers, UK.

TAGS

1946allusion • artful • clarity of thoughtcliche • colloquial lexicon • common metaphorscommunicationcomprehending language • connotation • dying metaphors • EnglishEnglish language • evocative power • expressionexpressive repertoirefigurative languagefigure of speechGeorge Orwellhackneyedidiomimaginative metaphorsindirect reference • inventing phrases • languagelanguage developmentlazinessliteraturemental imagemetaphor • mixed metaphor • ordinary word • poetic devices • poetic functionsentence • tired expressions • use of wordsverbal freshness • visual image • vividness • worn-out • writing • writing style • writing tips

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

The Shape of A Story: writing tips from Kurt Vonnegut

"A few years ago, Open Culture readers listed Slaughterhouse Five as one of your top life–changing books. But Kurt Vonnegut was not only a great author. He was also an inspiration for anyone who aspires to write fiction – see for example his 8 rules for writing fiction, which starts with the so–obvious–it's–often–forgotten reminder never to waste your reader's time.

In this video, Vonnegut follows his own advice and sketches some brilliant blueprints for envisioning the 'shape' of a story, all in less than 4 minutes and 37 seconds."

(Open Culture, 4 April 2011)

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TAGS

8 rules for writing fiction • authorblueprintcausally related narrative eventscurvefiction • good fortune • ill fortune • Kurt Vonnegutnarrativeplotscreenwritingshape • Shape of A Story • Slaughterhouse 5story • story beginning • story ending • story shapetipswriting tips

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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