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Which clippings match 'Media Consumer' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 NOVEMBER 2014

They Live: sunglasses reveal subliminal capitalist messages

"John Carpenter's They Live (1988), one of the neglected masterpieces of the Hollywood Left, is a true lesson in critique of ideology. It is the story of John Nada–Spanish for 'nothing'! –, a homeless laborer who finds work on a Los Angeles construction site, but has no place to stay. One of the workers, Frank Armitage, takes him to spend the night at a local shantytown. While being shown around that night, he notices some odd behavior at a small church across the street. Investigating it the next day, he accidentally stumbles on several more boxes hidden in a secret compartment in a wall, full of sunglasses. When he later puts on a pair of the glasses for the first time, he notices that a publicity billboard now simply displays the word 'OBEY,' while another billboard urges the viewer to 'MARRY AND REPRODUCE.' He also sees that paper money bears the words 'THIS IS YOUR GOD.' Additionally he soon discovers that many people are actually aliens who, when they realize he can see them for what they are, the police suddenly arrive. Nada escapes and returns to the construction site to talk over what he has discovered with Armitage, who is initially uninterested in his story. The two fight as Nada attempts to convince and then force him to put on the sunglasses. When he does, Armitage joins Nada and they get in contact with the group from the church, organizing resistance. At the group's meeting they learn that the alien's primary method of control is a signal being sent out on television, which is why the general public cannot see the aliens for what they are. In the final battle, after destroying the broadcasting antenna, Nada is mortally wounded; as his last dying act, he gives the aliens the finger. With the signal now missing, people are startled to find the aliens in their midst."

(Slavoj Zizek)

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TAGS

1988advertising billboardsalien invasion • alien occupation • broadcasting antenna • buy and obey • Cable 54 • capitalist ideologychurchconsumerism • contact lenses • control • critique of capitalism • critique of ideologycult filmcultural critique • drifter • dystopia • homeless labourer • Hooverville • ideology • John Carpenter • Keith David • kick ass and chew bubble gumLos Angelesmass mediamedia consumermedia consumption • Meg Foster • nameless drifter • passive consumptionpervasive advertisingpost-ideological society • prophetic • Roddy Piper • ruling class • satirical film • science fiction • shantytown • Slavoj Zizek • subliminal advertising • subliminal messages • sunglassesThe Perverts Guide to Ideology (2012)They Live (1988)threat • underground organisation • unmasked • watch television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JULY 2013

Is Photoshop Remixing the World?

"Photoshop has completely revolutionized our visual culture. Artists now use Photoshop to create complex imagery that would have been impossible 20 years ago. It has also profoundly changed the art of photo retouching, turning a labor intensive process into an artful and often controversial digital workflow. But possibly the most current and expressive influence can be seen in meme culture online. With the ability to alter any image in the media landscape, everyday people now have the means to critically comment on culture and spread their ideas virally, leveling the playing field between traditional media creators and consumers. Photoshop has changed the way we communicate, the way we express ourselves, and the way we view the world and each other."

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altering images • amateur cultural productionbaroquebeauty industry • Chris Buck • complex imagery • compositingcreative practice • critically comment • digital workflow • Don Caldwell • everyday people • expressive influence • Jeff Huang • labour intensive • Laurent Le Moing • Matt Jones • Matthias Vriens • media consumermedia landscapememe culturememesOff Book • online discourse • PBS • pepper spraying cop • photo manipulationphoto retouchingPhotoshop • photoshop disasters • photoshopped • photoshopping • producers and consumersquestioning traditionsremix culture • Robert Maxwell • thumbs and ammo • traditional media creator • Txema Yeste • visual communicationvisual culturevisual effectsworkflowworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: passive consumption through audience participation

"When the 'Family' (the television with its 'cousin' announcers and actors) presents an interactive play in which Linda believes she has a role, an actor (Donald Pickering) wearing glasses with thick, black rectangular frames, turns to the camera as it zooms in on him and says, 'What do you think, Linda?'"

(Tom Whalen, Gale Student Resources In Context)

Whalen, Tom. "The Consequences of Passivity: Re–evaluating Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451," in Literature–Film Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 3, July, 2007, pp. 181(10).

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1966Alphaville • anti-intellectualism • audience participation • banbannedBernard Herrmannbig brotherbook • book burning • book-people • booksburning • Clarisse (character) • comic bookconformityconsolettecontroldisplay walldomestic futuresdystopiadystopian futureFahrenheit 451fire • fire department • firefighter • fireman • Francois Truffaut • Furia • futuristic societyGattacahousewifehumourindividualisminteractive dramainteractive experience • interactive teledrama • interactive television • It Happened Here (film) • Julie ChristieLinda (character)literature • Machiavelli • mahogany veneer • massificationmedia consumerMetropolis (1927)Montag (character)new forms of television • Nicolas Roeg • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)Oskar Werner • parlor wall • parlour • participation dramaparticipative media • passive consumer • passive consumptionpicture newspaper • pro-literature underground • Ray Bradburyreadingreality televisionscience fictionself-reflexivity • sensory deprivation • speculative fictionsubversion • telecast • televisiontelevision screenThe Family (television) • The Handmaids Tale • The Martian Chronicles • The Prince (book) • THX 1138 • totalitarianism • TV parlor • TV story • TV wall • video wall • visual joke • wall TV • wall-sized screen • what do you think • written languagewritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2011

Discussion Paper: a new Australian classification scheme?

"This chapter outlines factors in the media environment that necessitate reform of media classification and the development of a new National Classification Scheme. It identifies the range of trends which have been associated with media convergence, including increased access to high–speed broadband internet, digitisation, globalisation, accelerated innovation, the rise of user–created content and the changing nature of the media consumer, and the blurring of distinctions between public and private media consumption. It also draws attention to findings arising from the Convergence Review, and recent work undertaken by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (the ACMA) on 'broken concepts' in existing broadcasting and telecommunications legislation and their relevance to media classification. "

(Australian Law Reform Commission, 30 September 2011, p.45)

1). Australian Law Reform Commission (September 2011). 'National Classification Scheme Review', Discussion Paper 77

[Recommendations by Australian government agency for media policy and law reform.]

TAGS

2011 • accelerated innovation • access • ACMA • ALRC • Australia • Australian Communications and Media Authority • Australian Law Reform Commission • Australian Law Reform Commission Act • broadbandbroadcasting • broken concepts • changeconsumptionconvergencedigitisationdiscussion paper • federal agency • globalisation • Graham Meikle • high-speed broadband • ICTknowledge-based economylaw • legal reform • legislation • media classification • media consumermedia convergencemedia policymedia regulation • National Classification Scheme • old media • private media • private media consumption • reform • reform of media classification • reviewtechnological innovationtelecommunications • telecommunications legislation • trends • user-created content

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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