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Which clippings match 'Interaction Design Research' keyword pg.1 of 2
08 JULY 2013

The Media and Performance Laboratory at Utrecht School of the Arts

"The Media and Performance LAB (MAPLAB) is founded by the Research Centre Theatre Making Processes at the Faculty of Theatre, Utrecht School of the Arts. It is initiated and led by Joris Weijdom, head of the research group Virtual Theatre.

The main goal of the MAPLAB is to provide a space for research into the possibilities of interactive technology in a performative context, and to translate this into didactic strategies.

The modular approach to space, tools and diversity of interdisciplinary making processes the MAPLAB provides outstanding conditions to research, design and develop at the intersection of the performing arts, media and interaction."

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TAGS

artistic research • augmented stage • creative making • culture and innovation • design research • didactic strategies • engagement and participationinteraction design research • interactive digital media • interactive technology • interdisciplinarity • interdisciplinary making processes • Joris Weijdom • MAPLAB • media and interaction • media and performance • Media and Performance LAB • mixed realitymotion-trackingnew media artperformance art • performance lab • performance research • performative context • practice-based research • professional know-how • reactive spaceresearch centreresearch group • technology and interfaces • theatretheatre arts • theatre making • theatre making process • theatre technology • UtrechtUtrecht School of the Arts • virtual theatre • Virtual Theatre (research group)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

Interaction design research artefacts intended to produce knowledge

"We differentiate research artifacts from design practice artifacts in two important ways. First, the intent going into the research is to produce knowledge for the research and practice communities, not to make a commercially viable product. To this end, we expect research projects that take this research through design approach will ignore or deemphasize perspectives in framing the problem, such as the detailed economics associated with manufacturability and distribution, the integration of the product into a product line, the effect of the product on a company's identity, etc. In this way design researchers focus on making the right things, while design practitioners focus on making commercially successful things.

Second, research contributions should be artifacts that demonstrate significant invention. The contributions should be novel integrations of theory, technology, user need, and context; not just refinements of products that already exist in the research literature or commercial markets. The contribution must demonstrate a significant advance through the integration. This aspect of a design research contribution makes particular sense in the interaction design space of HCI. Meteoric technological advances in hardware and software drive an aggressive invention of novel products in HCI and interaction design domains that are not as aggressively experienced by other design domains. While product designers might find themselves redesigning office furniture to meet the changing needs of work, interaction designers more often find themselves tasked with inventing whole new product categories.

Our model of design research allows interaction design researchers to do what designers do best: to study the world and then to make things intended to affect change. Our model provides a new channel for the power of design thinking, desired by many disciplines, to be unleashed as in a research context. Design researchers can contribute from a position of strength, instead of aping the methods of other disciplines as a means of justifying their research contribution."

(John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, Shelley Evenson, p.500, 2007)

John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, and Shelley Evenson (2007). "Research through design as a method for interaction design research in HCI". In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '07). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 493–502. DOI=10.1145/1240624.1240704 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1240624.1240704

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design: Prototyping

"As design–led and practice–based research institution, CIID has expertise in directly engaging with design and technological materials to produce prototypes. Prototyping is at the center of CIID's design culture; it provides us with the methods and means to probe future scenarios, situate design discourses and test design and technical implementations in real world contexts. Our prototyping methods range from simple paper based co–creation props to functional physical prototypes of complex systems. In addition, video scenarios and various experience prototyping methods are employed, in the early stages of our research, in order to bring forward surprisingly foundational insights about the 'role' a technological object or system may have in the real world. Overall, insights derived from all prototypes feed back into our research process to re–iterate over its concepts or focus. With clear probing or prompting goals, we can better use sketches in materials, hardware and software to think and communicate about research, technologies and their societal impacts."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2012

Interaction-Design.org: Making research accessible since 2002

"The Interaction–Design.org Foundation is a labour of love founded by Mads Soegaard in 2002, and in 2010, his wife, Rikke Dam, joined the project. Apart from Rikke and Mads, hundreds of people have helped out and continue to do so.

We're on a mission to make free and open educational materials: There are so many great minds in the Human–Computer Interaction and Interaction Design community and we want to empower these authors to reach all their interested readers around the world. We believe these authors have the minds to change the world and deserve a publishing venue truly designed for the author and the reader, not the publisher and the profit."

(Mads Soegaard and Rikke Dam)

fig.1 Interview with Dag Svanaes by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Dam (2011). Video: "Philosophy of Interaction Video 2 – Guiding Principles of Interaction Design derived from Heidegger". Retrieved 15 June 2012 from http://www.interaction–design.org/tv/Philosophy_of_Interaction_Video2_Guiding_Principles_of_Interaction_Design_derived_from_Heidegger.html

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TAGS

2002authorschange the worldconceptual model • designed for the author and the reader • Edmund Husserlemotional designethnography • free and open educational materials • human-computer interactioninformation architectureinformation visualisationinteraction design • Interaction Design community • Interaction Design Foundationinteraction design research • interested readers • labour of love • Mads Soegaard • Martin HeideggerOpen Educational Resources (OER)publisher and the profit • publishing venue • Rikke Dam • usabilityuser experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 SEPTEMBER 2011

Research through design as a method for interaction design research

"design artifacts as outcomes that can transform the world from its current state to a preferred state. The artifacts produced in this type of research become design exemplars, providing an appropriate conduit for research findings to easily transfer to the HCI research and practice communities."

(John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, Shelley Evenson)

John Zimmerman, Jodi Forlizzi, and Shelley Evenson (2007). "Research through design as a method for interaction design research in HCI". In Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI '07). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 493–502. DOI=10.1145/1240624.1240704 http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1240624.1240704

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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