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05 SEPTEMBER 2014

EDUCAUSE: 7 things you should know about flipped classrooms

"The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Short video lectures are viewed by students at home before the class session, while in–class time is devoted to exercises, projects, or discussions. The video lecture is often seen as the key ingredient in the flipped approach, such lectures being either created by the instructor and posted online or selected from an online repository. While a prerecorded lecture could certainly be a podcast or other audio format, the ease with which video can be accessed and viewed today has made it so ubiquitous that the flipped model has come to be identified with it.

The notion of a flipped classroom draws on such concepts as active learning, student engagement, hybrid course design, and course podcasting. The value of a flipped class is in the repurposing of class time into a workshop where students can inquire about lecture content, test their skills in applying knowledge, and interact with one another in hands–on activities. During class sessions, instructors function as coaches or advisors, encouraging students in individual inquiry and collaborative effort."

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TAGS

2012 • 7 Things You Should Know About • active learningactivity-based instructionactivity-based learning designs • application of ideas • atelier model • class time • course podcasting • Educause • EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative • flipped approach • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomgroup tutorialshands-on activitieshomework • hybrid course design • in-class time • individual enquiry • learning and teachinglearning initiativelearning modellearning through practicepedagogic approachespedagogical modelpedagogy • short video lectures • student engagementstudio approachstudio practiceteaching methodsteaching practicestechnology transforming learninguniversity teachingvideo lectureworkshop sessions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2014

Collaborative peer learning through pair programming

"Pair programming is a style of programming in which two programmers work side–by–side at one computer, continuously collaborating on the same design, algorithm, code, or test. One of the pair, called the driver, types at the computer or writes down a design. The other partner, called the navigator, has many jobs. One is to observe the work of the driver, looking for defects. The navigator also has a more objective point of view and is the strategic, long–range thinker. Together, the driver and the navigator continuously brainstorm a solution. Periodically, the programmers switch roles between the driver and the navigator."

(Laurie Williams, 2007)

Williams, L. (2007). "Lessons learned from seven years of pair programming at North Carolina State University." SIGCSE Bull. 39(4): 79–83.

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TAGS

active learning • brainstorming solutions • co-learnercollaborative learningcomputer programming education • continuously collaborating • design pedagogy • design roles • design teams • driver (peer learning) • Laurie Williams • learn to codelearning is socially enactedlearning processlearning software • learning strategies • learning support • navigator (peer learning) • North Carolina State University • pair programming • participatory learningpedagogic approachespedagogic practicespeer instructionpeer learningpeer-production • role specialisation • side-by-side • social learningsocial-constructivist approachsoftware programmingtechnology educationworking practicesworking together

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
16 APRIL 2013

SCALE-UP: solving the shortcomings in traditional physics instruction

"Studio/workshop classes such as SCALE–UP (Student–Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs) give instructors another choice by replacing the lecture/laboratory format with 4–6 hours of activity–based instruction per week, typically in 2–hour blocks. This format has several advantages over the traditional lecture/laboratory format. Because the entire class is taught in the same room with the same students and instructors in each class, all activities, including laboratory experiments, can be arranged to build on one another in sequence for greater learning impact (14) than when some activities are taught in small sections running parallel to the lecture course. When a lab section is taught as a separate course, it is often weeks or at best a few days ahead of or behind the lecture, and for some students, the lab course is not even taken in the same term as the lecture. Additionally, even in an interactive lecture, students can avoid instructors by hiding in the middle of the row, away from the aisles. In the studio format, instructors can freely circulate and interact with any group at any time."

(Robert Beichner and Jeffery Saul)

TAGS

active learningactivity-based instructionactivity-based learning designs • American Association for the Advancement of Science • biologychemistryclassesclassroom • conceptual understanding • curriculum development • faculty interactions • faculty membershands-on activities • hands-on experiments • instructional materials • interactive lecture activities • interactive lecture demonstrations • interactive lectures • introductory curricula • laboratory • laboratory experiments • large classes • learning and teaching • lecture course • lecture/laboratory formatpedagogic approachespedagogic practices • pedagogic support • peer instruction • PER • physics • Physics Education Research • physics instruction • physics tutor • recitation • SCALE-UP • SCALE-UP project • small classes • STEM subjects • Student-Centred Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programmes • studio approach • studio/workshop classes • teaching methodstraditional practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2011

infoKit: effective use of VLEs

"The use of technology to support learning and teaching has changed dramatically in recent years.

Most institutions are now exploring the possibilities of e–learning and many have implemented VLEs or virtual learning environments. These tools offer great possibilities but they need to be used effectively if they are to deliver maximum benefit for students.

This infoKit takes you from the theoretical frameworks underpinning good teaching to the practice of e–learning. We consider how technology affects the roles of learner and teacher in a number of real–life scenarios. The infoKit is based on sound pedagogic approaches and draws on case studies of good practice across the UK.

Whether you are new to e–learning or an experienced practitioner there are pathways to guide you through the relevant sections of the infoKit. The infoKit will continue to grow and expand as the knowledge base develops and we welcome your participation in its further development."

(2011 Northumbria University, on behalf of JISC Advance)

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TAGS

best practicecase studiesCMC • Computer-Mediated Conferencing • e-assessmentelearninggood practice • infoKit • infoNetJISCknowledge baselearnerslearning activitieslearning and teachinglearning resource • Managed Learning Environment • MLE • Northumbria Universitypedagogic approachespedagogyresourceteacherteachingtheoretical frameworkstoolUKvirtual learning environmentsVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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