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12 OCTOBER 2014

Less, But Better: Dieter Rams's Influence on Today's UI Design

"Design should not dominate things, not dominate people, it should help people".

(Dieter Rams, Gestalten)

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20th century design • Adrien Olczak • Anton Repponen • Awwwards • Braun • Braun Style • Celegorm • Christopher Paul • David Stefanides • Denis Shepovalov • design classics • design inspired by • Dieter Rams • Eder Rengifo • electronic appliances • Eugene Balashov • Filip Slovacek • functionalism • functionalist vision • Gestalten • gute form • Hans GugelotHfGindustrial designindustrial designerinfluential designerinterface metaphor • Joao Pires • Jordi Verdu • Kirill Zhylinsky • Klaus Klemp • less but better • Luca Banchelli • Osme Pietro • Otl Aicher • Peter Behrens • Piotr Kwiatkowski • principles of good design • rationalist vision of design • Simon Alexander • SK2 radio • SK5 • skeuomorphism • TG60 • tone et type • UI designUlm School of Designuser interface designuser interface metaphorvisual metaphor • Vladimir Kovalev • Wilhelm Wagenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2009

Otto Neurath and Josef Frank: habit and tradition shape daily life

"the interpretation I would like to offer is that the relationship between architectural modernism and the Vienna Circle was a problematic one at best. The principal reasons were philosophical and ideological in nature. Specifically, over the course of the second half of the 1920s and early 1930s [Otto] Neurath and Josef Frank grew increasingly skeptical [sic] of the idea that the planning of the physical environment could cause corresponding changes in the social environment. That is to say, they were acutely conscious of the role that habit and tradition played in shaping daily life, and they were not convinced that the anti–decorative language that modernist architecture embodied would bring about social and political change of its own accord."

(Nader Vossoughian, HOPOS Lecture, 25 June 2004)

Fig.1 The Müller Villa in Prague which was commissioned by František Müller and his wife Milada and built between 1928 and 1930 according to Adolf Loos's design.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2004

non-places: when functionality is prized more highly than experience

"But the real non–places of supertnodernity – the ones we inhabit when we are driving down the motorway, wandering through the supermarket or sitting in an airport lounge waiting for the next flight to London or Marseille – have the peculiarity that they are defined partly by the words and texts they offer us: their 'instructions for use', which may be prescriptive ('Take right–hand lane'), prohibitive ('No smoking') or informative ('You are now entering the Beaujalais region'). Sometimes these are couched in more explicit and codified ideograms (an road signs, maps and tourist guides), sometimes in ordinary language. This establishes the traffic conditions of spaces in which individuals are supposed to interact only with texts, whose proponents are not individuals but 'moral entities' or institutions (airports, airlines, Ministry of Transport, commercial companies, traffic police, municipal councils); sometimes their presence is explicitly stated ('this road section financed by the General Council', 'the state is working to improve your living conditions'), sometimes it is only vaguely discernible behind the injunctions, advice, commentaries and 'messages' transmitted by the innumerable 'supports' (signboards, screens, posters) that form an integral part of the contemporary landscape.

France's well–designed autoroutes reveal landscapes somewhat reminiscent of aerial views, very different from the ones seen by travellers on the old national and departmental main roads. They represent, as it were, a change from intimist cinema to the big sky of Westerns. But it is the texts planted along the wayside that tell us about the landscape and make its secret beauties explicit. Main roads no longer pass through towns, but lists of their notable features – and, indeed, a whole commentary – appear on big signboards nearby. In a sense the traveller is absolved of the need to stop or even look. Thus, drivers batting down the auto route du sud are urged to pay attention to a thirteenth–century fortified village, a renowned vine–yard, the 'eternal hill' of Vezelay, the landscapes of the Avallonnais and even those of Cezanne (the return of culture into a nature which is concealed, but still talked about). The landscape keeps its distance, but its natural or architectural details give rise to a text, sometimes supplemented by a schematic plan when it appears that the passing traveller is not really in a position to see the remarkable feature drawn to his attention, and thus has to derive what pleasure he can from the mere knowledge of its proximity."

(Marc Augé pp.96–97)

Augé, Marc. 1995 Non–Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity, London/New York, : Verso.

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