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19 JULY 2014

Using OneNote for gathering design project requirements

"Having a laptop open in a research interview puts a barrier between you and the person you're interviewing, and the typing can be quite distracting and intimidating for the interviewee. But typed notes are searchable, making for very useful reference when you're synthesizing your notes. OneNote is a nice compromise. With a Tablet in slate mode, we remove the physical barrier of the laptop, and as long as you have the pen in a 'Create Handwriting' mode, you can later go back and search your notes as if they were typed. (The handwriting recognition is pretty amazing.)

We sometimes have interviews by phone, and in these cases we often type notes. OneNote can go back and forth pretty seamlessly between handwriting and text, so it keeps all notes in one place. Also I find the quick–keys for adding tags to notes to be very useful when typing. You can tag questions you have, comments for follow–up, and ideas you generate, all with the quick stroke of a key.

For really important meetings, we can also use the audio recording features, which gives the ability to later go back and click on a piece of handwriting to hear what was being said at the time. Unfortunately you have to be using an external microphone for this, or all you hear is the tap–tap–tapping of the stylus hitting the slate surface instead of insightful interview conversation.

And I should note that research is not where OneNote shines the most. There are a few competing tools, like the LiveScribe Echo SmartPen and even pen and paper and that are giving it a run for its money. But as long as we're outfitting our designers with the Tablet, OneNote is a fine tool to use during research."

(Chris Noessel, 7 March 2013, Cooper Journal)

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TAGS

audio recording • client interview • client liaisoncontent integration • content integration tool • design businessdesign objectivesdesign plandesign projectgeneral grounding document • handwriting • handwriting recognition • interaction design • Livescribe Echo Smartpen • managing design • Microsoft OneNote • multimedia toolnotebooknotesnotetakingpen and paperpersonas (UCD) • project reference • project requirements • requirements capture • requirements elicitationrequirements gatheringresearch interviewscope of practicesearchable content • slate mode • synthesising information • Tablet PCtext recognition • typed notes • user storiesvideo documentationworkflow toolworking practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2011

Citizen science: predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game

"People exert large amounts of problem–solving effort playing computer games. Simple image– and text–recognition tasks have been successfully 'crowd–sourced' through games, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be solved with human–directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search space. Here we describe Foldit, a multiplayer online game that engages non–scientists in solving hard prediction problems. Foldit players interact with protein structures using direct manipulation tools and user–friendly versions of algorithms from the Rosetta structure prediction methodology, while they compete and collaborate to optimize the computed energy. We show that top–ranked Foldit players excel at solving challenging structure refinement problems in which substantial backbone rearrangements are necessary to achieve the burial of hydrophobic residues. Players working collaboratively develop a rich assortment of new strategies and algorithms; unlike computational approaches, they explore not only the conformational space but also the space of possible search strategies. The integration of human visual problem–solving and strategy development capabilities with traditional computational algorithms through interactive multiplayer games is a powerful new approach to solving computationally–limited scientific problems."

(Seth Cooper, Firas Khatib, Adrien Treuille, Janos Barbero, Jeehyung Lee, Michael Beenen, Andrew Leaver–Fay, David Baker, Zoran Popović & Foldit players)

Nature 466, 756–760 (05 August 2010) doi:10.1038/nature09304 Received 22 January 2010 Accepted 30 June 2010

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TAGS

algorithm • biochemistry • biomedicalcitizen sciencecollaboration • computational approaches • computational challenge • computer games • computing science • crowdsourcingdiscovery through designDNA • DNA sequence • Foldit • gamesimage recognitioninsight through designinteractive gamesmulti-player • multi-player online game • Nature (journal) • non-scientists • online gameplaying • predication • problem-solving • protein structure prediction • protein structures • scientific problems • scientists • structural biology • text recognitiontheory buildingvisual problem-solvingvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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