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10 APRIL 2012

VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study: Case Study for the pragmatic direct digital capture of artworks from the Surrey Institute of Art and Design

"The VADS Fine Art Project aims to bring together, through a distributed digitisation model, artworks from across Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) that can serve to exemplify the history and achievement of fine art education and practice in this country since its inception in the 1850s.

In the initial stages of the project, a survey was sent out to all the Higher Education Institutions in the UK that taught fine art, in order to elicit whether or not student and staff work had been kept or documented. From this survey it was found that many colleges failed or had ceased to collect artworks due to the cost implications of purchasing, storing and insuring the works, leading to the output of many art colleges remaining undocumented.

As the Fine Art Project progressed, protocols for the digital capture, documentation and copyright clearance of work were established. These were then used to collect works from around the country to be included in the National Fine Art Education Digital Collection. However, given their inherent useable and easily applicable nature, it was thought the same protocols could be just as useful to digitally capture, document and rights–clear works within HEIs as and when they were being produced. This would make it far easier and affordable for colleges to capture and maintain collections of their present and past work, as well as offering additional benefits such as making them widely available on the Internet or for other publishing requirements."

(Ed Bremner, 1 September 2003 [last modified: 28th March 2006], Institute for Learning and Research Technology)

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TAGS

1850s2003AHDS Visual Artsartworkartworks • capture and maintain collections • case study • collect works • collecting artworks • collectioncopyright clearance • cost implications • digital capture • digitally capture • digitisation • direct digital capture • distributed digitisation model • documentation • documented • fine art • fine art education • fine art practice • Fine Art Project • HEI • Higher Education Institutes • higher education institutions • history and achievement • image management system • insuring artworks • Internetknowledge management • National Fine Art Education Digital Collection • pilot project • pilot study • present and past work • protocol • publishing requirements • purchasing artworks • raw filerepository • SIAD • storing artworks • student and staff work • Surrey Institute of Art and Design • surveyUKVADS • VADS Fine Art Project • VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2012

Revised AHRC Research Funding Guide for Practice-Led Research

"If you are applying for funding to support a practice–led research project, please read the following advice for framing your proposal.

For your research to be considered as practice–led, your own practice must be an integral part of the proposed programme of research, and the creative and/or performative aspects of the research must be made explicit. Interdisciplinary proposals are welcomed, including those which fall within subjects traditionally defined as humanities as long as the main focus of the research is practice–led.

The research carried out should bring about enhancements in knowledge and understanding in the discipline, or in related disciplinary areas. This requirement excludes research to provide content. For example, if a film–maker wanted to make a film about refugees, the research questions should be about the process of making the film, not about the experience of the refugees. Work that results purely from the creative or professional development of an artist, however distinguished, is unlikely to fulfil the requirements of research."

(AHRC, p.72)

2). Arts and Humanities Research Council (January 2012). "Research Funding Guide" Version 1.7

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TAGS

2012AHRCarts and humanitiesArts and Humanities Research Councilcontribution to knowledgecreative practice researchdesign research projectguidelinesHEI • Independent Research Organisation • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary proposals • knowledge and understandingpractice-based research • programme of research • requirements of research • researchresearch fundingResearch Funding Guideresearch processresearch projectresearch questionsresearch requirementsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2011

Opening up UCAS Data

"The 'Big Idea' behind my entry to the TSO competition was a simple one–make UCAS course data (course code, title and institution) available as data. By opening up the data we make it possible for third parties to construct services and applications based around complete data skeleton of all the courses offered for undergraduate entry through clearing in a particular year across UK higher education.

The data acts as scaffolding that can be used to develop consumer facing applications across HE (e.g. improved course choice applications) as well as support internal 'vertical' activities within HEIs that may also be transferable across HEIs.

Primary value is generated from taking the course code scaffolding and annotating it with related data. Access to this dataset may be sold on in a B2B context via data platform services. Consumer facing applications with their own revenue streams may also be built on top of the data platform.

This idea makes data available that can potentially disrupt the currently discovery model for course choice and selection (but in its current form, not in university application or enrolment), in Higher Education in the UK."

(Tony Hirst, 2011)

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TAGS

annotationapplicationsB2B • consumer facing applications • course choice • course choice applications • course code • course data • course selection • course title • coursesdatadata integration • data platform • data platform services • dataset • discovery model • enterpriseentrepreneurship • entry through clearing • HEHEIhigher educationinformation in contextinnovationintegrationJISCmash-uporganisations • revenue streams • services • third parties • TSO • TSO OpenUP Competition • UCASUKundergraduateuniversity applications processuniversity enrolmentvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 NOVEMBER 2009

HEFCE : Research : Research Excellence Framework (REF)

"The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is the new system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions (HEIs). In previous years, research quality has been assessed periodically through the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

We are currently consulting on proposals for the new framework. We will issue guidance on the REF in 2010 after completing the consultation. The first REF exercise is due to be completed in 2013.

We are working in collaboration with the Scottish Funding Council, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, the Department for Employment and Learning (Northern Ireland), and with a wide range of stakeholders to develop the new framework. Representatives of the four funding councils sit on a steering group which oversees its development.

The REF will focus on three elements, which together reflect the key characteristics of research excellence. These are:

* Outputs: The primary focus of the REF will be to identify excellent research of all kinds. This will be assessed through a process of expert review, informed by citation information in subjects where robust data are available (for example, in medicine and science).

* Impact: Significant additional recognition will be given where researchers build on excellent research to deliver demonstrable benefits to the economy, society, public policy, culture and quality of life. Impacts will be assessed through a case–study approach that will be tested in a pilot exercise.

* Environment: The REF will take account of the quality of the research environment in supporting a continuing flow of excellent research and its effective dissemination and application."

(Higher Education Funding Council for England)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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