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Which clippings match 'Film Editing' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 FEBRUARY 2015

1980s television commercial for Westpac Bank, Australia

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TAGS

1980sadadvertisement designAustraliabank • banking • cinematographycolour tintfilm editing • incomplete sentences • quick cutsselective focus • sentence fragments • shallow depth of fieldshallow focustelevision advertisement • television commercial • TVCWestpacWestpac Bank • Westpac Banking Corporation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2013

The Kuleshov Effect

"Technique which demonstrates the inherent power of montage as a primary tool in the manipulation of the viewer's perception. According to Kuleshov, cinema consists of fragments and it is their combination rather than their content that is essential in evoking and triggering different emotions. His original experiment consists of using the same shot of the character's face, frozen in a neutral emotion while editing it next to different objects he appears to be glancing at: a girl in a coffin, a bowl of soup, and a woman. The audience interpreted the three situations as expressions of sadness, hunger and lust."

(Laura Minca)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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TAGS

2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

Neurocinematics: The Neuroscience of Film

"This article describes a new method for assessing the effect of a given film on viewers' brain activity. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during free viewing of films, and inter–subject correlation analysis (ISC) was used to assess similarities in the spatiotemporal responses across viewers' brains during movie watching. Our results demonstrate that some films can exert considerable control over brain activity and eye movements. However, this was not the case for all types of motion picture sequences, and the level of control over viewers' brain activity differed as a function of movie content, editing, and directing style. We propose that ISC may be useful to film studies by providing a quantitative neuroscientific assessment of the impact of different styles of filmmaking on viewers' brains, and a valuable method for the film industry to better assess its products. Finally, we suggest that this method brings together two separate and largely unrelated disciplines, cognitive neuroscience and film studies, and may open the way for a new interdisciplinary field of 'neurocinematic' studies."

(Uri Hasson, Ohad Landesman et al.)

Hasson, U., Landesman, O., Knappmeyer, B., Vallines, I., Rubin, N. and Heeger, D. (2008), Neurocinematics: The neuroscience of films. Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind 2, 1–26.

TAGS

Barbara Knappmeyer • brain • brain activity • cognitive control • cognitive film theory • cognitive neuroscience • computational neuroscience • David J. Heeger • directing style • eye movement • eye-trackingfilm editingfilm industryfilm studies • film viewing • fMRI • functional magnetic resonance imaging • Ignacio Vallines • inter-subject correlation • inter-subject correlation analysis • interdisciplinary field • ISC • motion picture sequences • movie content • movie watching • Nava Rubin • neurocinematic studies • neurocinematicsneuroscience • neuroscience and film • neuroscience of film • Ohad Landesman • perception • Projections (journal) • psychophysics • quantitative neuroscientific assessment • similarities • social neuroscience • spatiotemporal responses • styles of filmmaking • Uri Hasson • viewerviewingvisionvisual perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2009

Tension & Release: What are the functions of rhythm in film?

"All of the tools, the choreographic processes, and the editor's sources of intuitive knowledge about editing a film's rhythm are used by editors in service of fulfilling rhythm's purposes in film. The question in this chapter is: What are the functions of rhythm in film? The following discussion suggests that the functions of rhythm are to create cycles of tension and release and to synchronize the spectator's physical, emotional, and cognitive fluctuations with the rhythms of the film."

(Karen Pearlman, 05 March 2008, The Art of the Guillotine)

Karen Pearlman, 2009. 'Cutting Rhythms: Shaping the Film Edit'. Focal Press.

Fig.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho shower scene; Fig.2 CHAPTER 3: Timing, Pacing, and Trajectory Phrasing; Fig.3 CHAPTER 4: Tension, Release, and Synchronization; Fig.4. A podcast of Karen Pearlman.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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