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Which clippings match 'Telematic Art' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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TAGS

20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JUNE 2004

FuckU-FuckMe(tm) for Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT

"FuckU–FuckMe(tm) for Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows NT provides the most complete remote sex solution for the Internet and corporate intranet. Powerful features let you sexually communicate with your remote partner and provide an absolutely realistic sensual experience of a real intercourse. The basic FuckU–FuckMe(tm) kit consists of two hardware units – genitalDrive(tm) model M (male) and genitalDrive(tm) model F (female) and an accompanying software interface.The genitalDrive is an internal device in a standard case that can be installed in any free 5.25" slot of your PC. The FuckU–FuckMe software connects your genitalDrive with a corresponding unit on a remote PC using TCP/IP protocol. When you start remote sexual intercourse with your partner using FuckU–FuckMe(tm) the system will transmit all your actions to his/her genitalDrive and precisely reproduce them in real time. The system has intuitive interface and allows you to entirely concentrate on remote communication."

(Alexei Shulgin, 2004, Media Art Net)

[Alexei Shulgin's tongue–in–cheek critique of our modern condition including pre–eminence of disposable consumption, dehumanisation and the affordances of cybernetic interaction via the Internet.]

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TAGS

1999 • 5.25 inch slot • Alexei Shulginanalogue • corporate intranet • cyberartscyberdildonicscyberneticcybernetic artcybernetic communicationdildo • dildonics • FuckU-FuckMe(tm) • FUFME Inc. • genitalDrive(tm) model F (female) • genitalDrive(tm) model M (male) • haptic devicehaptic interface • hardware units • Internetintimate transactionintuitive interface • masturbator • Media Art Netnetworked art projectPCprostheticsremoteremote communicationremote partner • remote sex • remote sexual intercourseRussian artistsensual experiencesexsex toysexual intercoursesexually communicatesoftware interfacespeculative designtactile communicationteledildonicstelematictelematic arttelematic experiencetelematicstelepresencetongue-in-cheek • virtual sex • Windows 95 • Windows 98 • Windows NT
19 FEBRUARY 2004

CyberSM: remote tactile interaction

"The cyberSM project was an attempt to create a real time, visual, auditory, and tactile communication in the world of cyberspace. In the first cyberSM experiment, the user began to experience what others have only talked about for years: live, tactile communication through a computer environment. The CyberSM project expanded upon text based virtual environments, such as Minitel, MUDs, or most BBSs. It also takes the next logical step toward true telepresence by employing 3D graphics, live audio, and direct physical stimulation to allow participants to physically 'touch' each other over distances. The cyberSM project allows the establishment of trans_gender appearances, identities and entities by letting the participants choose their own visual appearance from a large databank of digitized human bodies. Once chosen, the participants send the image of their virtual self to the others on the network. The body thus becomes a visual fantasy. Central to the cyberSM project is the ability to transmit physical stimuli from one participant to the other. This is made possible through the use of stimulator suits connected over international telephone lines, which allow the users to remotely stimulate one–another's bodies. Not only does this physical element of communication allow the CyberSM project to more closely model inter–human communication, it creates a new form of interaction. Throughout the cyberSM connection, participants have a physical dialogue, but they remain anonymous the whole time."

(Ståhl Stenslie)

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03 JANUARY 2004

Interactive media: pioneering artists

An incomplete list: Agnes Hegedüs, Brenda Laurel, Carl Eugene Loeffler, Charlotte Davies, Christian Möller, Christian Sommerer, Dick Lüsebrink, Edmond Couchot, Grahame Weinbren, Gyorgy Kepes, Jean–Louis Boissier, Jeffrey Shaw, Joachim Sauter, Knowbotic Research, Laurent Mignonneau, Lynn Hershman, Michael MacKenzie, Monika Fleischmann, Myron Krueger, Nadia Magnenat–Thalmann, Paul Garrin, Paul Yuxweluptun, Peter Weibel, Rachel Strickland, Roy Ascott, Ryohei Nakatsu, Toni Dove, Toshio Iwai, Ulrike Gabriel, Wolfgang Strauss

Oliver Grau. 'Virtual Art' p.173–176

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TAGS

Agnes HegedusartistBrenda Laurel • Carl Eugene Loeffler • Char Davies • Christian Moller • Christian Sommerer • Dick Lusebrink • digital pioneers • Edmond Couchot • Grahame Weinbren • Gyorgy Kepesinteractioninteractiveinteractive media • Jean-Louis Boissier • Jeffrey ShawJoachim Sauter • Knowbotic Research • Laurent Mignonneau • Lynn Hershman • Michael MacKenzie • Monika Fleischmann • Myron Krueger • Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann • Oliver Grau • Paul Garrin • Paul Yuxweluptun • Peter Weibel • Picht • Rachel Strickland • Roy Ascott • Ryohei Nakatsu • telematic art • Toni Dove • Toshio Iwai • Ulrike Gabriel • Wolfgang Strauss • ZKM
02 DECEMBER 2003

Televirtual Fruit Machine

This interactive installation, similar to video games, was presented simultaneously at IC' 93 in Tokyo and Multimediale 3 at Karlsruhe, linked up by the digital ISDN network, the player in Tokyo could join up directly with a player at Karlsruhe. In order to bring together the two halves of the same object, the two players had to co–ordinate their movements and interactions visually, within the virtual space of the game.

The work centres–on a virtual 'fruit–machine' that is controlled by users communicating via a ISDN network.The fruit–machine metaphor references the Paradise parable.

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