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Which clippings match 'Scientific Visualisation' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MARCH 2015

SandyStation: an augmented reality sandbox

"Jedná se unikátní projekt dvou studentů, Petra Altmana a Roberta Ecksteina z fakulty aplikovaných vÄ›d Západočeské univerzity v Plzni, kteÅ™í jej prezentují pod názvem SandyStation. Jde zÅ™ejmÄ› o vůbec první pískovištÄ› na svÄ›tÄ›, u kterého můžete upravovat zdrojový kód, pÅ™ehrávat firmware a pÅ™edevším maximálnÄ› propustit uzdu své fantazii :–).

SandyStation efektivním způsobem využívá senzorů Kinectu, který je umístÄ›ný ve výšce zhruba 2 metrů nad boxem s obyčejným pískem a používá se ke sledování hloubky na snímané ploše. Pokud na pískovišti udÄ›láte tÅ™eba bábovku nebo vyhloubíte díru, Kinect tuto informaci zpracuje a pÅ™edá unikátnímu programu, jež objekty rozpozná a následnÄ› pošle potÅ™ebná data projektoru a vykreslí obraz do prostoru pískovištÄ›. To vše se dÄ›je téměř okamžitÄ› v reakci na činnost, kterou uživatel na pískovišti vykoná."

And as translated from Czech to English using Google Translate: "This is a unique project of two students, Peter Altman and Robert Eckstein from the Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia, who present it under the name SandyStation. This is probably the first ever sand in the world, where you can edit the source code, firmware and play primarily lay off up to your imagination :–).

SandyStation effective use of the Kinect sensor, which is situated at a height of about 2 metres above the box with ordinary sand and is used to monitor the depth on the scanned surface. If the sandbox you do need a cake or drilling our hole, Kinect processes this information and passes a unique programme that recognizes objects and then sends the necessary data projector and paint a picture of the space sandbox. It all happens almost instantly in response to the action that the user performs the sandbox."

(JiÅ™í Hrma, 28 November 2011)

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TAGS

2011applied sciences • AR Interactive Sandbox • augmented reality • colourful landscapes • contour linesCzech Republicdigital media experiencesexploratory learning experienceexplore and interactinteractive environmentsinteractive projection • interactive sandbox • kid-oriented experiences • Kinect 3D • Kinect sensor • object-based discoveryobject-based learningoverhead projector works • Peter Altman • Robert Eckstein • sand • sandbox • SandyStation • scientific visualisationtactile interactivetopographytoy • University of West Bohemia • video processing framework • video trackingvirtual modelvisual representations of scientific conceptsvolcano • Vrui VR • Xbox Kinect

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Immersive underwater experience for high school students

"The Virtual Reef is a life–sized marine ecosystem expanding across two levels of the new Science and Engineering Centre. Multi–touch technologies enable the user to manipulate, intimately explore and interact with the reef world, specific behaviours and relationships.

Australia's leading marine science and interactive and visual design organisations, QUT and the Queensland Museum, bring knowledge and research of the underwater world to your fingertips through multi–touch screens and projectors.

Users will have the opportunity to go beyond the cinematic experience and interact with the marine world. Each interaction has associated content designed to complement the aims of the National Curriculum and provide an exploratory learning experience."

(Jeff Jones, the Cube, QUT)

Fig.1 "The Virtual Reef" project team: Professor Jeff Jones (Cube Project Leader), Associate Professor Michael Docherty (Project Leader), Warwick Mellow (Principal Animator/Art Director), Joti Carroll, Paul Gaze, Sean Gobey, Ben Alldridge, Sophia Carroll, Sherwin Huang, Bryce Christensen.

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TAGS

20123Danimation • art director • asset creation • Australia • Ben Alldridge • Bryce Christensen • character rigging • cinematic experience • creaturedigital engagementdigital technologyecologyecosystemexperience designexploratory learning experienceexplore and interactfish • Great Barrier Reef • healthy oceanshigh schoolimmersive environmentsimmersive experienceinteractioninteractive displayintimate interactionJeff JonesJoti Carroll • life-sized • marine • marine ecosystem • marine science • marine world • Michael Docherty • multi-touch screenmulti-touch technologiesnational curriculumnatural environment • Paul Gaze • Queensland Museum • Queensland University of TechnologyQUTQUT Cube Projectsreefresearch projectresource for studentsScience and Engineering Centre • scientific exploration • scientific visualisation • Sean Gobey • Sherwin Huang • simulated experience • Sophia Carroll • The Cube Projects • The Virtual Reef • underwater • underwater experience • underwater world • virtual heritagevisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisationWarwick Mellowwildlife

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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TAGS

20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Scientific illustrations depict scientifically important features

"As a scientific illustrator, one must be able to convey a detailed, clear and accurate depiction of a specimen. Scientific illustrations are an important part of the documentation that makes a specimen museum–quality – along with field and research notes, accession records, photographs, and correspondence about the specimen. A scientific illustration captures information about a plant or animal, information that is often missing from the museum specimen. Scientific illustrations depict the scientifically important features of the organism being studied. They often also describe that organism's natural environment."

(National Museum of American History)

Fig.1 George Venable (1992). Drawing of a Carabid beetle from South America, created for the research of Dr. Terry L. Erwin of the Department of Entomology, courtesy of the Entomology Illustration Archive, NMNH

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TAGS

accession records • accuracy • animal information • biomedical illustrationdetailed drawingdocumentationentomology • Entomology Illustration Archive • fidelity • field notes • George Venable • illustrationillustration to visually communicate informationinterpretation • museum specimen • National Museum of American Historynatural environmentorganismplant information • research notes • sciencescientific illustrationscientific illustratorscientific visualisation • scientifically important features • scientistsSmithsonian Institutespecimenvisual depictionvisual fidelityvisual representationvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2011

Theory building through DNA visualisation

Drew "Berry's animations function as a tool for representing activities occurring within our bodies that could otherwise only be seen at a magnification of 100 million times. What distinguishes these works in the context of the moving image art form is the creation of a visual landscape that is extraordinary, strange and other–worldly, even though viewers are armed with the knowledge that they are scientifically exact. To follow the virtual camera through this strange world reminds them of the constant energetic presence of their own seething, pulsing, cellular functions. Watching these works, viewers become strangers in their own skin, inhabitants of a foreign landscape. Berry uses this synthesis of scientific and digital technology to create a holistic sense of the world beneath people's skin, sending a ripple across the viewers' bodies as they interact with the work, enlivened with the knowledge of their organic relation to the alien world on screen."

(Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Australia)

Fig.1 Drew Berry (2003). 'Body Code' 3D computer animation displayed as single–channel DVD projection; stereo audio. 8:34 mins; colour. Sound design: Franc Tétaz. Collection: Australian Centre for the Moving Image. Courtesy: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) and the artist.

[These animations demonstrate the potential of design practice for revealing insight that might not otherwise be revealed. In this way preoccupations with visual fidelity and scientific accuracy must recognised as being only peripherally important.]

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TAGS

2003ACMIanimationAustralia • Australian Centre for the Moving Image • body • Body Code • cellconceptualisationdatadesign practicedigital technologydiscoverydiscovery through designDNA • Drew Berry • extraordinaryfidelitygraphic representationillustrationinsightmagnificationrepresentation • scientific accuracy • scientific methodscientific visualisationskintheory buildingVictoria (Australia)visual depictionvisual fidelityvisual representationvisualisation • Walter and Eliza Hall Institute • WEHI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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